Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to BooksLIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Books LIVE

BooksLIVESA

Gabriel García Márquez, who died last week, left behind an unpublished manuscript (via @nprbooks): fb.me/243zBdYJq

Nick Wood Attends “Literature and the Spoken Word” Session at Africa in Sci-Fi Event in London

Nick Wood, author of Stone Chameleon, has written about the Africa in Science Fiction event that was held in London last month. Wood attended the “Literature and the Spoken Word” session featuring Toyin Agbetu, Tosin Coker and Biram Mboob, whose short stories have been included in Dreams, Miracles and Jazz and AfroSF: Science Fiction by African Writers. The panel discussion highlighted the difference between science fiction about the future of Africa and science fiction that is just set in Africa.

AfroSFThe Stone ChameleonDreams, Miracles and JazzZoo City (SA edition)Future LovecraftThe Apex Book of World SF 2

Wood commented on the general state of African Science fiction, referring to Lauren Beukes as the “leading light” in South Africa. Books LIVE editorial team member Luso Mnthali also gets a mention for representing Malawi with her short story “People are Reading What You Are Writing”, which was included in the Future Lovecraft anthology.

Late November, ‘Africa Si-FI’ season featured visual images by Kofi Allen flickering across the large screen in the Queen Elizabeth Hall forum on London’s South Bank: http://kamarazikofiallen.weebly.com/ Stylish, futuristic images, with (black) men and women in exotic clothes that alternatively shroud – or shine with shocking power – sometimes even encasing in bulky suits, seemingly designed to protect against a hostile environment or unseen alien threats. These were just some of the images heralding the beginning of a ‘Literature and the Spoken Word’ session on ‘Africa in Science Fiction.’

More pictures scrolled across the screen later, additional to the work of Allen, generally marked out by colourful artwork. These images also included posters for a film such as ‘Robots of Brixton’, as well as paintings and sketches juxtaposing ancient (‘tribal’) scenes sprouting into futuristic ones; shaman alongside spaceships: http://www.voice-online.co.uk/article/science-fiction-comes-africa

Book details

 

Please register or log in to comment