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Franschhoek Literary Festival 2014 Liveblog: Saturday 17 May, 4pm – 5pm

Franschhoek Literary FestivalIt’s Franschhoek Literary Festival time: follow all the action from day two of the 2014 fest on our FLF Liveblog! Read from the bottom up.

17.13

Meanwhile, Books LIVE founder Ben Williams has been snapping authors wearing his Google Glass. Follow him on Twitter @benrwms:

17.05

17.04

17.04

One last question from the Old School Hall:

17.03

17.03

Some non-Books LIVE tweets from #FLF14:

17.00

Meanwhile, lucky lucky Helené is off this session and has made it to the bacon pop-up shop:

16.59

16.59

Cameron answers a question about the limits of the courts’ power, and possible government interference:

16.57

Cameron answers an audience question with a reference to Gevisser’s latest book:

16.56

16.55

Tlhabi echoes the sentiments expressed by Mark Gevisser in an earlier session: South African obsess over minor details, and read grave consequences into them:

16.54

Question session gets underway with Justice Cameron:

16.52

Robertson and Whyle talk a little about the research they undertook for their books:

16.51

A familiar feeling to writers, no doubt:

16.50

Cameron speaks about the failures of the courts, but insists he is still optimistic:

16.48

Maytham and Robertson discuss the line between fact and fiction, and the service done to the former by the latter:

16.44

Maytham speaks to Whyle about his latest book, Walk:

16.39

16.39

Robertson and Cartwright argue that literary fiction can and should be entertaining:

16.38

The concept of Ubuntu comes under scrutiny, with its inevitable and problematic racial implications:

16.36

The conversation between Cameron and Harris turns to Nkandla, and then Thabo Mbeki’s disastrous handling of the Aids crisi:

16.34

Cameron turns his focus to the injustice of equality:

16.32

Cartwright has some advice for future reviewers of Lion Heart:

16.31

Still on the subject of historical fiction resonating with the current day, Whyle says setting a novel in more than one time period massages that process into life:

16.29

Cameron says a random act of kindness changed his outlook, but adds that he believes his “break” came because of his race.

16.26

Sexual shame comes to the fore, with Cameron saying shame around HIV and sexual violence need to be confronted:

16.22

Things are hotting up at the New School Hall:

16.20

Some #FLF14 tweets from around the web:

16.19

Robertson speaks about the creation of history, with all its biases and omissions, and Whyle adds that he believes historical fiction should be relevant and meaningful to its reader:

16.17

But another key issue Cameron was keen to address was that of shame, and points out its many iterations:

16.14

Cameron says his life and the law have been intertwined since he was just seven years old:

16.12

At the Old School Hall, Maytham and Whyle begin their reminiscences:

16.11

Tlhabi, Engler and McKaiser start the discussion, pointing out some annoying South African habits:

16.07

Harris says Cameron’s Justice is an “extraordinary story”:

16.05

16.05

16.05

15.59

The last session of the day, live from Books LIVE’s team of intrepid tweeters, up next!

 

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