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Read an excerpt from Nnedi Okorafor’s Nebula Award-winning novella, Binti

BintiNigerian-American fantasy and science fiction author Nnedi Okorafor recently won a prestigious Nebula Award for her Afrofuturist novella Binti.

The Nebula Awards are voted on by the thousand-plus members active members of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. This year, women dominated the awards, with five out of the six prizes going to female authors.

Binti won Best Novella.

Naomi Novik’s Uprooted took the top award, Best Novel, Sarah Pinsker’s Our Lady of the Open Road took Best Novelette, Alyssa Wong’s “Hungry Daughters of Starving Mothers” won Best Short Story, Fran Wilde’s Updraft won the Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy. Mad Max: Fury Road, written by George Miller, Brendan McCarthy and Nick Lathouris, won the Ray Bradbury Award for Outstanding Dramatic Presentation.

To celebrate Okarafor’s win, this Fiction Friday is an excerpt from Binti – including an audio excerpt read by Robin Miles.

About the book

Her name is Binti, and she is the first of the Himba people ever to be offered a place at Oomza University, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy. But to accept the offer will mean giving up her place in her family to travel between the stars among strangers who do not share her ways or respect her customs.

Knowledge comes at a cost, one that Binti is willing to pay, but her journey will not be easy. The world she seeks to enter has long warred with the Meduse, an alien race that has become the stuff of nightmares. Oomza University has wronged the Meduse, and Binti’s stellar travel will bring her within their deadly reach.

If Binti hopes to survive the legacy of a war not of her making, she will need both the the gifts of her people and the wisdom enshrined within the University, itself – but first she has to make it there, alive.
 
Audio excerpt:


 

 
Excerpt, from Tor.com:

I powered up the transporter and said a silent prayer. I had no idea what I was going to do if it didn’t work. My transporter was cheap, so even a droplet of moisture, or more likely, a grain of sand, would cause it to short. It was faulty and most of the time I had to restart it over and over before it worked. Please not now, please not now, I thought.

The transporter shivered in the sand and I held my breath. Tiny, flat, and black as a prayer stone, it buzzed softly and then slowly rose from the sand. Finally, it produced the baggage-lifting force. I grinned. Now I could make it to the shuttle. I swiped otjize from my forehead with my index finger and knelt down. Then I touched the finger to the sand, grounding the sweet smelling red clay into it. “Thank you,” I whispered. It was a half-mile walk along the dark desert road. With the transporter working, I would make it there on time.

Straightening up, I paused and shut my eyes. Now the weight of my entire life was pressing on my shoulders. I was defying the most traditional part of myself for the first time in my entire life. I was leaving in the dead of night and they had no clue. My nine siblings, all older than me except for my younger sister and brother, would never see this coming. My parents would never imagine I’d do such a thing in a million years. By the time they all realized what I’d done and where I was going, I’d have left the planet. In my absence, my parents would growl to each other that I was to never set foot in their home again. My four aunties and two uncles who lived down the road would shout and gossip among themselves about how I’d scandalized our entire bloodline. I was going to be a pariah.

“Go,” I softly whispered to the transporter, stamping my foot. The thin metal rings I wore around each ankle jingled noisily, but I stamped my foot again. Once on, the transporter worked best when I didn’t touch it. “Go,” I said again, sweat forming on my brow. When nothing moved, I chanced giving the two large suitcases sitting atop the force field a shove. They moved smoothly and I breathed another sigh of relief. At least some luck was on my side.

* * * * *

Book details

 

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