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Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing a tour de force of biography writing and self-discovery, writes Karina M. Szczurek

Published in the Sunday Times

Doris Lessing, née Taylor, born in 1919. Photographed here in 1958. Picture: Getty Images.

 
Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing
*****
Lara Feigel, Bloomsbury, R540 (hardcover)

“There were too many weddings that summer,” writes Lara Feigel in the opening line of her brilliant and daring Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing. At the end of the first paragraph she promises herself that she “would work out why I minded it all so much”.

The resulting quest is a tour de force of biography writing and self-discovery. Literary scholars are often drawn to topics that are of interest and consequence for their own lives. Yet, even if that spark of private recognition is openly acknowledged, it is seldom explored in the official research.

The inclusion of intimate, personal reflections by the author when writing a biography of someone else is usually frowned upon. And it can be risqué. To do so anyway is heroic.

Feigel is a Reader in Modern Literature and Culture at King’s College London. In her most recent books, The Love-charm of Bombs and The Bitter Taste of Victory, she traced the public and private lives of writers and intellectuals during and after World War 2.

Published to great critical acclaim, they established Feigel as a cultural historian and literary critic of note. Both books are focused on the intersection of life and literature in history.

Free Woman follows in their footsteps, but this time Feigel herself becomes one of the book’s subjects. While exploring Lessing’s work and dedication to, in the words of one of her famous characters, “living as fully as I can”, Feigel searches for what the “right to live fully” would entail in her own life and writing.

“It seemed that Lessing was a writer to discover in your 30s; a writer who wrote about the lives of grown-up women with an honesty and fullness I had not found in any novelist before or since.”

We are mysteries, even to ourselves, and not many have had the ability to penetrate the silences shrouding our lives. In 1931, Virginia Woolf spoke about not having solved the problem of articulating “the truth about my own experience as a body… I doubt that any woman has solved it yet.”

Feigel’s attempt to do just that is fascinating. Facing her own sense of claustrophobia, frustration and lack of fulfilment as a woman, sexual being, wife and mother, Feigel seeks to understand what it means to be a truly “free woman” – most importantly, one “who is also happy”.

The journey she embarks on and the inner truths she discovers about herself through the lens of Lessing’s striking, often contradictory, life demand a lot of courage. And reading Feigel’s account is equally empowering. Outside of her writing, Lessing is remembered for two facts: that she abandoned two of her children and that she had an awkward affair with communism. Feigel goes into the details of both these relationships.

No matter what else can be said about Lessing, there is little doubt that she was bold. She was not afraid to reach for what she felt she required to live a meaningful life as a woman and writer.

“It seems true of all enduring novelists … that they illuminate our lives, and that we live differently as a result of reading them,” Feigel states. Confronting her own body – its realities, longings and failures – as well as the relationships in her life and the need to be her own person, Feigel is just as fearless in trying to define what is crucial in making her own existence worthwhile.

Free Woman is simultaneously an incisive book of scholarship and a brave, liberating memoir. It will not only bring further, highly deserved recognition for its author, but undoubtedly inspire many readers to turn to Lessing’s work, afresh or for the first time. @KarinaMSzczurek

Book details
Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing by Lara Feigel
EAN: 9781635570953
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