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Archive for the ‘Competitions’ Category

Submit a review of your favourite children’s book and stand a chance to win!

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Leopard’s Leap, in collaboration with Open Book Fest, announces ‘Message on a Bottle’ competition!

Leopard’s Leap’s enthusiasm for literature is celebrated through its support of the Open Book Festival as well as an exciting annual competition focusing on an inventive way of combining the world of words with the world of wine. Entrants in previous years designed wine labels (2015), wrote haikus (2016) and shared delightful micro-stories in the 2017 flash fiction challenge.

The 2018 competition with the theme Message on a Bottle brings words and wine together in a way that is slightly nostalgic and promises the winning entrant exciting prizes and exposure.

“We love involving our supporters in our wine stories,” says Leopard’s Leap CEO Hein Koegelenberg.

“Sharing stories is at the heart of literature and is also such a big part of the hospitality around wine. We are delighted about our involvement with Cape Town’s Open Book Festival and would like to invite those who share our excitement for wine and words to enter the Message on a Bottle competition!”

Your challenge:

Combine words and wine and write a message for a bottle, using maximum 40 words, including at least three of the words below:

Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity

 
Your inspiration: Words and Wine

Have you always wanted to send your words into the world? Send us your entry as a Message on a Bottle – and stand a chance to win the following prizes:

• Cash prize of R5 000
• The winning Message on a Bottle will be the label for a specific Leopard’s Leap wine.
• 12 cases of Leopard’s Leap wine labelled with the winning Message on a Bottle.
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms
• Two Open Book Festival passes
• R500 Book Lounge voucher

Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys what is in the bottle!

Here are the rules:

• Competition opens for entries on Monday 16 July 2018
• Entries close on Sunday 5 August 2018 at midnight
• Judging to take place on Wednesday 15 August 2018
• Winner to be announced at the Open Book Festival Opening Bash on Tuesday 4 September 2018
• Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys a glass of wine! Use 3 of the following words to create a message on a bottle for our back label of 40 words or less
• Words: Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity
• No limit to number of entries per person
• E-mail your entry with contact details to: mailto:messageonabottle@leopardsleap.co.za
• Competition details and terms and conditions available at www.leopardsleap.co.za/messageonabottle
• The winning MESSAGE will be used as back label copy on a specific Leopard’s Leap wine that will be available to consumers in the domestic market
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries must be in English in order to comply with Leopard’s Leap back label regulations and requirements for sale in South Africa
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms (Facebook headers and posts, Twitter headers, website homepage, blog articles, newsletter and e-mail banners)
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be printed on various promotional items including posters, canvass and leaflets
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Judges: Hein Koegelenberg, Paige Nick, Mohale Mashigo and Pieter-Dirk Uys


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Emerging translator? Then this contest is for you!

Asymptote Journal has announced the fourth edition of their international translation contest, Close Approximations! Click here for the submissions guidelines.


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Play it forward: win and donate books!

Via TimesLive

When you read to your children, you invest in their future. Image: Rico

 
Many stories for children have been adapted over time from stories that were originally created for adults. In fact, translators have often been responsible for crafting and reshaping stories across time and space to suit their different audiences.

Think of Aesop’s fables. Aesop was a slave and storyteller in Ancient Greece in the 5th Century BCE. For centuries his stories moved across continents and were told and heard in many languages. They first appeared in print in 1484 – as stories for children, and in English. Even today, new versions of these stories continue to be created.

Many famous fairy tales have different versions around the world. For example, across Africa and Europe, in Russia, Appalachia, India and Japan, versions of the Grimm’s fairy tale, Hansel and Gretel, are told and read. So, the history of children’s literature is a history of translation. Through translation, stories from Greek, Latin, Hebrew, French, Italian and Asian languages have found their way into English. In South Africa, Pinocchio, originally written in Italian, has become Pinokiyo ngesiXhosa and is now appreciated by children who do not necessarily know that the story came from Italy.

‘Pinnocchio’ can now be enjoyed in isiXhosa, as ‘Pinokiyo’. Image: Rico.

 
Stories that originated in Africa have been retold in many languages too. All over the world people read the popular trickster tales featuring Hare, Tortoise or Spider. These stories use animals with human qualities to entertain and teach, and to share wisdom and understanding about human nature and human behaviour.

At the moment there are not enough children’s storybooks in African languages, either as original writing or as translations. But the numbers will grow as people get to know, choose, read and talk about storybooks with their children, and request storybooks in their languages of choice.

As citizens of the world, we are curious about each other and learn about each other as we tell and retell our stories.

Nal’ibali is growing a collection of stories in a range of South African languages. You can find them on the Nal’ibali website or mobisite.

Reading aloud to your children:

  • shows them that you value books and reading;
  • gives you things to talk about together;
  • builds a bond with them;
  • allows them to experience reading as a satisfying activity;
  • motivates them to learn to read for themselves and then to keep reading;
  • shows them how we read and how books work;
  • lets them enjoy stories that are beyond their current reading ability; and
  • develops their vocabulary and language abilities.
  • Try reading this story to your children

    Expand your children’s world! Read them the story of Neo’s imaginary adventure in Neo and the big, wide world by Vianne Venter, then do the Get creative! activity at the end of the story with them.

    Get your Nal’ibali supplement

    Sunday Times Express (Western Cape) – English and isiXhosa – Sunday, April 29

    Sunday World (North West Province) – English and Setswana – Sunday 29 April

    Sunday World (KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng) – English and isiZulu – Sunday 29 April

    Sunday World (Free State) – English and Sesotho – Sunday 29 April

    Sunday World (Limpopo) – English and Sepedi– Sunday 29 April

    • English and Xitsonga supplements will be available at selected SA Post Offices and reading clubs in Limpopo

    The Herald (Thursday 3 May) and Daily Dispatch (Tuesday 1 May) (Eastern Cape) – English and isiXhosa.

    Play it forward: WIN and donate books

    Two lucky readers can win 10 books each week and donate them to a school, reading club or library of their choice.

    The third runner-up will win a Nal’ibali reading-at-home starter pack.

    Books are donated by Tiso Blackstar Group and Jacana Media.

    To enter, contact patti.mcdonald@tisoblackstar.co.za before 5pm on Thursday, May 10 and give one reason why we need to read to children in their mother tongue. Include your name, cellphone number and physical address.

    Winners will be announced on Friday, May 11. Terms and conditions apply.


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SIMAMELE is calling for original short story submissions from young writers aged between 13 and 17 years!

Via SIMAMELE

SIMAMELE invites original short story submissions from young writers aged between 13 and 17 years. We encourage parents, care givers, guardians, young minds and educators across all South African provinces to encourage and support young creative minds in telling their stories; in any official language of South Africa.

The short stories will be published in the Young Scribes section of the SIMAMELE web publication and the contest will run for a period between May and November 2018.

Are you in love with writing? Do you have a passion for story telling? Are you creative, original, and imaginative? If your answer is yes, then the SIM Young Scribes Writing Competition is for you.

The SIM Young Scribes prize recognises the need to honour and nurture excellence from a young age and the role that reading and writing plays in the development of a just and open society where “everybody feels free yet bounded to others; where everyone embraces their full potential.”

The Award

In 2018, the SIM Young Scribes Prize will recognise one Young Scribe with an award valued at R 10,000. The award will include:

  • A bookstore voucher valued at R 2,500
  • Tablet to the value of R 2,500
  • Mobile data for a year valued at R 3,500
  • A cash sum of R 1,500
  • The name of the winner will be published on the SIMAMELE website and any other media publication that will participate.

Eligibility

The Prize is open to anyone between the ages of 13 and 17 years.

Entries must be entirely the work of the entrant and should have never been published before.

Entrants must be South African.

Submit an Entry

Please visit https://www.simamele.co.za/young-scribes for more information and instructions on how to submit an entry.

The deadline for submissions is 1st May, 2018.

For any question, please do not hesitate to contact Precious at publish@simamele.co.za


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Win a copy of Izinkanyezi Ezintsha!


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
BooksLive, in collaboration with The Times, is giving away five copies of Izinkanyezi Ezintsha (New Stars); an isiZulu short story anthology!

How to enter:

The first five lucky readers to mail The Times’s education consultant, Patti McDonald, will receive a copy: Patti.Mcdonald@tisoblackstar.co.za. Your email must include your name, cell phone number and physical address.

About the book:

We are excited and proud to announce the release of Kwasukela Books’ debut publication: Izinkanyezi Ezintsha. Featuring seven isiZulu short stories, Izinkanyezi Ezintsha is the product of a desire to bring new and exciting isiZulu literature from new voices.

Being the first-ever collection of speculative fiction in isiZulu, Izinkanyezi Ezintsha pushes the boundaries of how isiZulu literature is imagined in South Africa and the world.

The seven authors and the titles of their stories are as follows:

Cullen Mackenzie: ‘iMpi kaSikhulumi noHlokohloko’
EB Maphumulo: ‘iNgulube kaGudla’
Fred Khumalo: ‘Kwakungcono eGibithe’
Manqoba Masondo: ‘uZuzile’
Zandile Khumalo: ‘uNtsika eZweni leseThembiso’
Bongeka Noxolo: ‘iNgwenya enoMusa’
Thembi Gwebu: ‘iMpumelelo yeziNkomo eNkantolo’


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Win a copy of François Bloemhof’s Feeding Time!

It was recently announced that the Capetonian author, François Bloemhof, a prolific writer of adult, teenage and youth fiction, who has written close to 80 titles, is going to Hollywood!

This versatile writer’s adult work explores thriller, supernatural and more conventional dramatic themes, but for his Hollywood debut, he will be writing the screenplay of a movie with a thriller/sci-fi slant.

A friend encouraged him to pitch for the screenplay for Hollywood. Cleverly, he took the outline of an Afrikaans thriller which was published in 1997, Die Nagbesoeker, and gave it a sci-fi twist. And so, The Night Visitor was born.

The plot centres around the story of a successful city model whose sister is murdered in a coastal town, but hers is not the only murder that takes place! The model, who is already in a relationship, visits the town and becomes attracted to a man who recently moved there. Strange things happen. Friends react unexpectedly. She comes to the conclusion that no one is to be trusted.

Three copies of Bloemhof’s most recent novel, Feeding Time, are up for grabs. To stand a chance to win a copy, simply tell us the title of the Afrikaans thriller which Bloemhof adapted into The Night Visitor. E-mail your answer to mila@book.co.za.

 

Book details


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“If you read, there’s no limit to what you can do”, writes the prize winner of the Nal’ibali/Sunday Times Storybook competition, Mangaliso Ngomane

BooksLIVE, in collaboration with Nal’ibali, recently ran a giveaway competition, offering 10 lucky readers the opportunity to win a copy of Storytime: 10 South African stories for children.

The first Sunday Times Storybook was launched three years ago to allow children from disadvantaged backgrounds to experience the magic of stories, especially in their own languages.

The Sunday Times has distributed two million copies of the first book in all 11 official languages free of charge to school, libraries and reading clubs across the country.

We asked readers to tell us why it’s so important to nurture a love of stories and reading among school children who have limited access to books.

Read Mangaliso Ngomane’s winning response:

Reading exposes a child to the avenues of their dreams so that they may be opened to the many available possibilities.

Thankfully there are many age appropriate stories in their own indigenous language to assist in early childhood development by relaying salient principles in a relatable way that they can understand and appreciate from a tender age.

Like our dearly departed president Nelson Mandela once said “talk to a man in his language and it goes to his heart”. That is especially true about a child reading in their language and thus taking pride in their cultural heritage and it also preserves their culture for future generations.

Considering all of this it is inconceivable that there are still children that have limited access to books and not just books but interesting books to nurture their love for reading

I for one have a toddler daughter for whom I’m always trying to get books and establish a library for in either siSwati (our home language) or isiZulu (the next best thing: both are Nguni languages).

I read to hear now and when she’s old enough to read on her own there will be a smooth transition into siSwati literature and an overall love for reading.

I recognize in myself, I love speaking siSwati and reading it now however because I picked up on siSwati as a First Additional Language in high school I had to work a little bit harder at it specifically and at reading any language generally.

I’m trying to correct that in her because if you read, there’s no limit to what you can do so I want to equipment her mind with the best possible tool with which to navigate the world.


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Giveaway! Win a copy of Storytime: 10 South African stories for children

BooksLIVE, in collaboration with Nal’ibali, will be giving away 10 copies of Storytime: 10 South African stories for children – and just in time for the impending 2018 school year!

The first Sunday Times Storybook was launched three years ago to allow children from disadvantaged backgrounds to experience the magic of stories, especially in their own languages. The Sunday Times has distributed two million copies of the first book in all 11 official languages free of charge to school, libraries and reading clubs across the country.

Storytime is a delightful collection of new stories by skilled writers such as Wendy Hartmann, Chris van Wyk, Maryanne Bester, Carole Bloch, Kagiso Legeso Molope, and Tuelo Gabonewe. Various illustrators contributed to the selection of enchanting stories, including Joan Rankin, Paddy Bouma, Shayle Bester, with a gorgeous cover by none other than Madam & Eve‘s Rico!

“We have been fortunate to work with a number of talented South African authors and illustrators in putting together this magical collection of stories. A treasured storybook can be just the thing to spark a love of reading in children and this is precisely our intention – to skill children to become readers for life,” comments Patti McDonald, publisher of Times Media Education’s supplements.

“Books and stories deepen our thinking and understanding by stretching our imagination while encouraging creative problem-solving. To have stories that our children can relate to in their home languages is an invaluable asset that we need to keep growing in our country,” adds Dr Carole Bloch, Director of PRAESA.

If you would like to receive a copy of Storytime, simply tell us why it’s so important to nurture a love of stories and reading among school children who have limited access to books. E-mail your answer to Patti (Patti.McDonald@tisoblackstar.co.za), and always remember the profound words of Nelson Mandela: “It is my wish that the voice of the storyteller will never die in Africa, that all children in the world may experience the wonder of books, and that they will never lose the capacity to enlarge their earthly dwelling place with the magic of stories.”


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Enter the 2018 Commonwealth Short Story Prize

Deadline: 1 November

Entries for the 2018 Commonwealth Short Story Prize have opened!

This prestigious prize is awarded for the best piece of unpublished fiction (2000 – 5000 words) in English. Regional winners receive £2,500 and the overall winner receives £5,000.

Translated entries are also eligible, as are stories written in the original Bengali, Chinese, Kiswahili, Malay, Portuguese, Samoan and Tamil.

The competition is free to enter.

Click here for the submission guidelines.

Watch the video below, created by the Commonwealth Writers YouTube channel, for both insight and inspiration:


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