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Archive for the ‘Current Events’ Category

‘We’re not scared of Zuma’ – Julius Malema rejects Nkandla settlement

The Coming RevolutionStill an Inconvenient YouthThe World According to Julius Malema

 
Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) leader Julius Malema has rejected President Jacob Zuma’s settlement offer over taxpayer cash spent on his Nkandla homestead.

“He thinks he can play with us …” Malema told a news briefing in Johannesburg.

“We’re not going to accept any settlement that doesn’t reaffirm the powers of Public Protector‚ that remedial actions are binding.”

Malema said since Zuma had flouted the office of the Public Protector Thuli Madonsela and her powers‚ the institution was no longer respected as before.

“We can’t have a situation where Zuma’s drum majorettes in parliament insult the Public Protector.

“We can’t accept that the Public Protector can be told that she is not God and her remedial actions aren’t binding.”

Watch the video:

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Malema lambasted his former political chief‚ saying Zuma was in breach of his office as he did not protect the public purse.

“We’re here because the corrupt President of SA has made an admission that he is corrupt and that he will pay back the money.

“They made a proposed settlement and they expect us to respond.

“In his typical way of trying to control everything and influence judges‚ he took a copy to court. Zuma being Zuma writes to us and copies judges so he can influence them. He wants them to see him as a reasonable man. The judges responded saying that they’re not interested‚ because that is the matter between the parties and won’t get involved.”

South Africa is not going to be another failed African state under the watch of the EFF‚ he proclaimed.

“We’re not scared of anyone. We’re not scared of Zuma and Parliament …

“This man is collapsing the country. We’re not scared of being beaten up. We’re prepared to die for protection of the Constitution.”

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Join Justice Malala, Ferial Haffajee and Ray Hartley for the next Times Talks event in Johannesburg

Times Talks with Ray Hartley, Justice Malala and Ferial Haffajee

 
The Sunday Times invites you to an evening of lively debate with leading commentators Justice Malala (We Have Now Begun Our Descent: How To Stop South Africa Losing Its Way) and Ferial Haffajee (What If There Were No Whites In South Africa?).

These two influencers be discussing the state of the nation with author and editor Ray Hartley (Ragged Glory) during a Times Talks event on Tuesday, 9 February at 6 for 6:30 PM. The evening will be hosted by Kingsmead College.

Tickets cost R120 and can be purchased on Webtickets. Cheese and wine will be served.

Not to be missed!

We Have Now Begun Our Descent: How To Stop South Africa Losing Its WayWhat If There Were No Whites In South Africa?Ragged Glory

 
Event Details

  • Date: Tuesday, 9 February 2016
  • Time: 6 PM for 6:30 PM
  • Venue: Kingsmead College
    132 Oxford Rd
    Johannesburg | Map
    Entrance in Tottenham Avenue, Opposite the Rosebank Gautrain Station
  • Speakers: Ray Hartley in conversation with Justice Malala and Ferial Haffajee
  • Refreshments: Cheese and wine
  • Cover charge: R120
  • Buy tickets: Webtickets

 

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The Time Has Come for Africans to Tell Their Own Stories: View a Preview from Affluenza by Niq Mhlongo

Niq Mhlongo

 
One of the most exciting titles of 2016 is Affluenza, Niq Mhlongo‘s long-awaited first collection of short stories. It will be published by Kwela in March this year.

Mhlongo is the author of three novels – Dog Eat Dog, After Tears and Way Back Home. His work has been translated into Spanish, Italian, French and German.

Dog Eat DogAfter TearsWay Back Home

 

AffluenzaWith Affluenza Mhlongo returns with a collection of stories that cover the span of our democracy – the euphoria of 1994, the Aids pandemic, xenophobia, the madness of Marikana and the Zuma presidency. The stories have been published to critical acclaim in France, Germany, Spain, Italy and the USA but remain largely unknown in South Africa.

2015 started with a bang, showing once again that things are not well in the beautiful country of South Africa. Mhlongo responded to Penny Sparrow and Chris Hart‘s racist social media comments – and the ensuing #RacismWillFall discussion – by sharing snippets from Affluenza on his Facebook page, writing that he explores this sensitive issue, along with others relating to current events, in his stories.

Read Mhlongo’s introduction to the short excerpts, and view photos of the manuscript which is now in the final round of editing:

Yesterday I was doing the very final proofreading of Affluenza (my new book which is coming out on the 20th of March this year). At the same time, we black people of South Africa were being insulted on social media; being called Monkeys by the likes of Penny Sparrow and Chris Hart. This tempted me to give you the taste of some of the issues explored in AFFLUENZA. I wrote this in 2009. Achebe pointed out that, ‘the last five hundred years of European contact with Africa produced a body of literature that presented Africa in a very bad light’. And this is the source where the likes of Penny and Chris draw from. Now the time has come for Africans to tell their own stories, including racism which is still is still rife in this country.

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Related stories:


 

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Author image courtesy of Victor Dlamini


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12 Key Moments from 2015: The Biggest Books News of the Year

12 Key Moments from 2015: The Biggest Books News of the Year

 
2015 was a big news year for Books LIVE; we broke a number of stories and even found books and authors making an impact in mainstream news media. This is not merely a reflection of good reporting on our part; it is an indication that books and book news are becoming more interesting to the average South African, and this is surely a development to celebrate.

Here are the 12 top stories from Books LIVE in 2015:

null1. Award-winning Mozambican Author Mia Couto’s Open Letter to Jacob Zuma on Xenophobia Crisis: “We Remember You in Maputo”

In April, Mia Couto wrote an open letter to President Jacob Zuma concerning the xenophobic violence in South Africa, beginning: “We remember you in Maputo, in the 1980s, from that time you spent as a political refugee in Mozambique.”

Zuma replied in an open letter of his own, saying “I remember you from our days in Mozambique,” and calling the neighbouring country his “second home”.

Read his reply here.

 

null2. South African Author ZP Dala Reportedly Taken to Mental Institution After Refusing to Renounce Salman Rushdie Comments

In April, PEN America reported that South African author ZP Dala had been taken to a mental institution in reprisal for her comments about Salman Rushdie during the Time of the Writer Festival in Durban in March.

Dala later clarified the situation surrounding her admittance to a mental healthcare facility, and has since then it seems her year has improved, as she inspired audiences at the Open Book Festival in Cape Town in September and also won the inaugural Minara Aziz Hassim Literary Awards for Debut Fiction for her novel What About Meera.

 

null3. RIP Andre Brink (1935 – 2015)

Celebrated novelist André Brink passed away in February, at the age of 79.

Brink was returning from Belgium, where he had been awarded an honorary doctorate from the Belgian Francophone Université catholique de Louvain (UCL).

Brink was one of our most versatile literary figures, a novelist, dramatist, travel writer, translator, critic and academic, and his books have been translated in more than 30 languages. He is dearly missed.
 

null4. Take your Women’s Day and shove it

Helen Moffett’s annual Women’s Day rant has become a Books LIVE tradition, and is usually responsible for a fair chunk of web traffic.

However, it is the original post – from 2012 – that catches the viral wave each August, this year coming in at number four.
 
 
 
 
 
 

null5. RIP Mark Behr (1963 – 2015)

Author Mark Behr has passed away in Johannesburg at the end of November at the age of 52, reportedly of a heart attack.

Behr was born in Tanzania in 1963, and grew up in South Africa. His first published novel, The Smell of Apples, appeared first in Afrikaans in 1993 as Die reuk van appels, winning the Eugène Marais Prize, the M-Net Award, the CNA Literary Debut Award and The Art Seidenbaum Award from the Los Angeles Times. It was released in English in 1995.

The success of the novel compelled Behr to speak publicly about his history as a campus spy for the South African security establishment, for which some have never forgiven him.

 

null6. “Look at Yourselves – It’s Very Abnormal”: Thando Mgqolozana Quits South Africa’s “White Literary System”

Thando Mgqolozana’s abandonment of the “white literary system” at the Franschhoek Literary Festival was surely the biggest literary news of the year; a topic that unlocked that rare achievement of breaking out of “books news” and becoming mainstream news.

Mgqolozana’s was not the first occasion of protest at a lack of transformation, or decolonisation, in the publishing industry, but it was perhaps the most influential, and led to a number of follow-up essays and opinion pieces.

 

null7. The curious cult of Cape Town

It’s no surprise that Sven Eick’s blogpost, in which he asserted that “Cape Town sucks big hairy geographical, socio-economic and climatic balls”, also had its viral moment. It begins:

‘But why?’

I’ve been asked this question by Capetonians at least twenty times since I made the decision to move from Cape Town to Johannesburg. Each time it’s accompanied by a look of genuine perplexity, like I’m completely insane. And while you’re reading this, I know some of you are thinking the same thing too.

 
 

null8. Urgent Appeal for Assistance to Raise Funds for Binyavanga Wainaina’s Medical Treatment

At the end of November, Kwani Trust set up a fundraiser to raise resources for urgent medical treatment for beloved Kenyan author Binyavanga Wainaina.

Wainaina suffered a stroke in October, and needed to travel to India for treatment. Thankfully, enough money was raised for him to travel there on 28 November. However, the fundraiser is still ongoing, and you can contribute here.

 
 
 

null9. “Avowed Racist” HP Lovecraft will No Longer Represent the World Fantasy Award, 4 Years After Nnedi Okorafor’s Initial Call

In November, the World Fantasy Awards announced that winners would no longer receive a bust of HP Lovecraft as their trophy. The decision was made in the wake of growing discomfort among authors who regard Lovecraft as an inappropriate figure owing to his “fundamental racism”.

Nigerian-American author Nnedi Okorafor received the World Fantasy Award for her novel, Who Fears Death, in 2011, becoming the first black person to win the award since its inception in 1975. But then she discovered a poem Lovecraft had written in 1912 entitled “On the Creation of Niggers”, and called for a change.

 

null10. Translation of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s We Should All Be Feminists to be Handed Out to Every 16-year-old in Sweden

Possibly the first Books LIVE story to be picked up by Buzzfeed, The Guardian, Quartz, The New Republic, The Washington Post, and many more, usually without so much as a hat-tip. A bittersweet milestone.

 
 
 
 
 
 

null11. An Inappropriate Text for an Appropriate Evening – Read Antjie Krog’s Keynote Address from the 2015 Sunday Times Literary Awards

Poet, author and activist Antjie Krog delivered the keynote address at the 2015 Sunday Times Literary Awards in June. She made a call for white South Africans to perform an act of radical outreach, similar to that of Nelson Mandela 20 years ago when he pulled on Francois Pienaar’s jersey at the 1995 Rugby World Cup.

Krog made statements that drew spirited reactions of a positive and negative sort from the audience – both at the venue and on Twitter – but the speech cemented her position as one of South Africa’s most important public intellectuals.

 
 

null12. South African Author Ishtiyaq Shukri Releases Statement After Being Detained and Deported from London’s Heathrow Airport

In July, Ishtiyaq Shukri released a statement of protest after he was detained and deported from Heathrow Airport in London. The 2004 European Union Literary Award-winning author of The Silent Minaret and I See You, had travelled to Heathrow, from where he was to join his wife, who is English, at their home in London. He was searched and detained for nine-and-a-half hours, before being deported back to South Africa.

Shukri said he decided to make a public statement and share his experience to highlight “the increasing heavy-handedness facing African migrants at UK and EU borders”.


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2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature Shortlist Announced

2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature Shortlist Announced

 
Alert! Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Penny Busetto and Rehana Rossouw have been shortlisted for the 2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature.

The Etisalat Prize is awarded annually to a work of first fiction by an author of African citizenship.

2015 Etisalat Prize shortlist:

* * * * *

Judges’ comments:

Chair of judges Professor Ato Quayson says: “The variety of styles and subject matter of the books on this year’s Etisalat Prize for Literature shortlist reveal the vitality of contemporary African literature.

“They contribute to our understanding of what it is to love, to laugh, to improvise, sometimes to despair, to know and yet be fooled by the assurance of such knowledge, to work for our ablution in the fate of another’s suffering, and ultimately to embrace life in all its bewildering complexities.”

Zukiswa Wanner adds: “This year’s Etisalat Prize for Literature shortlist showcases the varied voices emerging on the African literary scene, bringing something beautiful and unique to the reading experience.”

The third member of the judging panel, Molara Wood, concludes: “The shortlisted books challenge ready notions about new writing from Africa. They expand the field of literary engagement with themes of nationhood and the self. These are highly original voices whose works will charm and astonish new readers, through the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and deservedly so.”

* * * * *

The shortlisted writers are taken on a sponsored multi-city book tour and will also have 1 000 copies of their books purchased by Etisalat for distribution to schools, libraries and book clubs across Africa.

The winner of the 2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature will be announced in March and will receive £15 000 (about R348 000) and an engraved Montblanc Meisterstück pen. The Prize also includes an Etisalat sponsored fellowship at the University of East Anglia, mentored by Professor Giles Foden, author of The Last King of Scotland.

Zimbabwean NoViolet Bulawayo won the inaugural Etisalat Prize for We Need New Names in 2013, and Songeziwe Mahlangu won the 2014 edition for Penumbra.

* * * * *

The 2015 See the Etisalat Prize longlist of nine books was:

The Story of Anna P, as Told by HerselfWhat About MeeraBy Any MeansShadow SelfThe ReactiveWhat Will People Say
nullTram 83The Fishermen

 
Press release

Etisalat Prize for Literature 2015 Shortlist Announced

Lagos, Nigeria: December 14, 2015: Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Penny Busetto and Rehana Rossouw are today announced as the three shortlisted authors for the 2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature. The Etisalat Prize for Literature is the first pan-African Prize that is open solely to debut fiction writers from African countries. Now in its third year, it is acknowledged as the most prestigious literary prize for African fiction.

The three books, selected from the longlist of nine, are:
• Fiston Mwanza Mujila (Democratic Republic of Congo) – Tram 83 (Deep Vellum)
• Penny Busetto (South Africa) – The Story of Anna P, as Told by Herself (Jacana Media)
• Rehana Rossouw (South Africa) – What Will People Say? (Jacana Media)

The shortlist was selected by a three-member judging panel: Professor Ato Quayson, Professor of English and inaugural Director of the Centre for Diaspora Studies at the University of Toronto (Chair of Judges); Molara Wood, writer, journalist, critic and editor; and Zukiswa Wanner, author of Men of the South and London Cape Town Joburg.

Chair of judges, Professor Ato Quayson, comments: “The variety of styles and subject matter of the books on this year’s Etisalat Prize for Literature shortlist reveal the vitality of contemporary African literature. They contribute to our understanding of what it is to love, to laugh, to improvise, sometimes to despair, to know and yet be fooled by the assurance of such knowledge, to work for our ablution in the fate of another’s suffering, and ultimately to embrace life in all its bewildering complexities.”

Zukiswa Wanner adds: “This year’s Etisalat Prize for Literature shortlist showcases the varied voices emerging on the African literary scene, bringing something beautiful and unique to the reading experience.”

The third member of the judging panel, Molara Wood concludes: “The shortlisted books challenge ready notions about new writing from Africa. They expand the field of literary engagement with themes of nationhood and the self. These are highly original voices whose works will charm and astonish new readers, through the Etisalat Prize for Literature, and deservedly so.

The shortlisted writers will be rewarded with a sponsored multi-city book tour and will also have 1,000 copies of their books purchased by Etisalat for distribution to schools, libraries and book clubs across the Continent.

NoViolet Bulawayo won the maiden edition of the Etisalat Prize for Literature with her highly celebrated debut novel, We Need New Names, while Songeziwe Mahlangu emerged winner of the 2014 Etisalat Prize for Literature competition with his novel, Penumbra

The winner of the 2015 Etisalat Prize for Literature will be announced in March and will receive £15,000, an engraved Montblanc Meisterstück pen. The Prize also includes an Etisalat sponsored fellowship at the University of East Anglia, mentored by Professor Giles Foden, author of The Last King of Scotland.

The distinguished Patrons of the Etisalat Prize are noted the acclaimed writer Ama Ata Aidoo (Ghana), Pulitzer Prize Winner Dele Olojede (Nigeria), editor, critic and 2015 Man Booker Prize Judge, Ellah Wakatama Allfrey, OBE (UK/Zimbabwe), writer and public intellectual Kole Omotoso (Nigeria), editor, writer, broadcaster, consultant and co-founder of Allison & Busby, Margaret Busby, OBE (UK/Ghana) and novelist, poet and playwright Zakes Mda (South Africa).

For more information about the prize, visit the Etisalat Prize for Literature website.

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Will Oscar Pistorius Be Found Guilty of Manslaughter? – Final Verdict Released Today

In less than an hour the Supreme Court of Appeal will announce their verdict over whether or not Oscar Pistorius is guilty of manslaughter for the death of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

Karyn Maughan is standing by in Bloemfontein for eNCA to report on the judge’s decision.

Watch the live stream on eNCA:

 
Also check out the EWN live blog of today’s proceedings.
 

Pistorius stood trial for the murder of Steenkamp, who he shot and killed through the bathroom door on Valentine’s Day 2013.

In September last year, Pistorius was found guilty of culpable homicide and the negligent discharge of a firearm in a public place and was acquitted of the two murder charges and two additional firearms charges.

Early in November, the State appealed Pistorius’ culpable homicide conviction in an attempt to overturn the verdict to murder. If the athlete is found guilty of murder, he could face up to 15 years in prison.

 

Times LIVE and The Guardian both provided a summary of the arguments that were heard during the State’s appeal to overturn Pistorius’ sentence:

Among the arguments were whether he had fired four shots into a tiny toilet cubicle despite realising that someone might have been killed by his action. Another question was whether the high court had correctly applied the legal principles on the circumstantial evidence and the multiple defences he had given in his defence.

High court judge Thokozile Masipa ruled last year that the state had failed to prove Pistorius had shown intent or dolus eventualis, a legal concept that centres on a person being held responsible for the foreseeable consequences of their actions.

The state argued at the appeal that Masipa misinterpreted some parts of the law, including dolus eventualis.

If the court of appeal overturns Masipa’s verdict, she will be responsible for passing a new sentence on Pistorius, according to legal experts.

So, will Pistorius head back to prison on a manslaughter conviction or will he continue to serve his lesser culpable homicide sentence?

Read the article to find out why one Appeal Court judge thinks Pistorius is heading back to jail:

Nel agreed with judge Leach when he asked whether Pistorius must have foreseen that his action would result in the death of a person behind the door.
“Even on the finding that he did not know it was Steenkamp behind the toilet door‚ it did not matter. Even if he was under the impression that Reeva was in bed‚ he had necessary intent to bring [about] the demise of the person behind the door‚” Leach asked‚ and Nel agreed.
Another question was whether the high court correctly conceived and applied the legal principles pertaining to circumstantial evidence and pertaining to multiple defences by the accused.

The case has inspired a host of authors to put their analysis of the events to paper:

Chase Your ShadowBehind the DoorOscar: An Accident Waiting to HappenDie staat vs OscarPieces of the PuzzleReeva: A Mother's Story

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Poet Ashraf Fayadh Sentenced to Death in Saudi Arabia – Add Your Name to Appeal for Mercy

 
Ishtiyaq Shukri has called on artists, poets and writers to add their names to his letter of appeal for Ashraf Fayadh, the Palestinian poet who has been sentenced to death by Saudi Arabian authorities.

To add your name to the appeal (at the end of this post) email contact@bookslive.co.za – please add your profession (eg writer/poet/artist) and your city of residence.

Fayadh is a member of British-Saudi contemporary art organisation Edge of Arabia, and has curated art exhibitions during Jeddah Art Week and at the Venice Biennale. He was reportedly sentenced to four years in prison and 800 lashes in May 2014, but after a retrial is now due to be executed. Fayadh, who did not have legal representation, has been given 30 days to appeal against the ruling.

PEN International reports:

Fayadh was first detained in August 2013 in relation to his collection of poems, Instructions Within. He was released on bail but rearrested in January 2014, accused of ‘atheism and spreading some destructive thoughts into society’, before being sentenced in May 2014. The dismissal of his appeal led to the retrial which concluded earlier this week. Fayadh is reported to be ‘really shocked’ by the sentence, stating ‘I didn’t do anything that deserves death’.

The New York Times reports:

For years, Ashraf Fayadh, an artist and poet, has served as an unofficial ambassador for Saudi Arabia’s small contemporary art scene, organizing shows and working to introduce Saudi art to the world.

Although Mr. Fayadh is of Palestinian origin and officially stateless, Saudi Arabia is the only home he has ever known, his friends say, and he sees art as a line of communication between Saudi society and the rest of the world.

Margie Orford, president of PEN South Africa and member of the executive board of PEN International, told the Daily Maverick:

“I am appalled that writer and artist Ashraf Fayadh has been sentenced to death for ‘atheism’ by a Saudi Arabian court,” she said. “Saudi Arabia has an appalling human rights record and is particularly vicious towards those who think, speak, write or draw freely.” The world was “poorer and more fearful” because of religious fundamentalism and political intolerance, she said.

Shukri, the author of the 2004 European Union Literary Award-winning novel The Silent Minaret and, most recently, I See You, has written an open letter:

Dear Fellow Artists, Poets and Writers

You will by now have heard of the death sentence handed down to the Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh by a Saudi court for apostasy.

I have written the following appeal for mercy to the Ambassador of the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia to the Republic of South Africa in Pretoria, His Excellency, Ambassador Mohammed bin Mahmoud bin Ali Al-Ali.

If you would like to add your name to the appeal, please let me know. This is a matter of life and death, and time is of the essence, so do please let me know as soon as possible.

Kind regards
Ishtiyaq Shukri

The proposed letter reads as follows:

From South African Poets, Writers and Artists
To the Ambassador of the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia
Pretoria
South Africa

Your Excellency, Ambassador Mohammed bin Mahmoud bin Ali Al-Ali

We are deeply saddened to hear about the death sentence handed down to the Palestinian poet Ashraf Fayadh by a Saudi court for apostasy. We join the literary community and human rights organisations in their calls to have this harsh punishment rescinded. We ask you in your capacity to intervene on Fayadh’s behalf and to appeal to the Saudi authorities to demonstrate compassion and mercy for Ashraf Fayadh.

Signatories

Ishtiyaq Shukri
Writer
South Africa

To add your name to the appeal (at the end of this post) email contact@bookslive.co.za – please add your profession (eg writer/poet/artist) and your city of residence.

Image courtesy of Tzetze


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Oscar Pistorius was Released from Prison Late Last Night – What Happens Now? (Video)

Chase Your ShadowBehind the DoorPieces of the PuzzleOscar: An Accident Waiting to HappenDie staat vs OscarReeva: A Mother's Story

 
Oscar Pistorius was released from Kgosi Mampuru II Correctional Centre late last night, and placed under correctional supervision at this uncle’s home in Pretoria.

Pistorius’ move was made a day earlier than expected, presumably to avoid media attention. The former Olympic athlete has spent just shy of a complete year in jail, after being found guilty of culpable homicide in October 2014.

BBC reported on the move, and the conditions of Pistorius’ house arrest:

Oscar Pistorius was driven under cover of darkness to his uncle’s house 20 minutes away, a premature departure designed presumably to avoid the media glare, says the BBC’s Karen Allen in Pretoria.

It is understood he will not be electronically tagged but he will have restrictions on his movement, she adds.

His parole conditions include gun ownership restrictions and continued psychotherapy sessions. The disabled sportsman is also expected to do a period of community service.

The Guardian has shared a video public reactions to the house-arrest, and of Manelisi Wolela, correctional services spokesman, confirming the details of Pistorius’ release from Kgosi Mampuru II:

 

Watch The Guardian’s video summing up Oscar’s current situation. June Steenkaamp, Reeva’s mother, is featured in the video. She says, “He knows what happened. He’s going to live with that forever. I don’t care what happens to him. I really don’t.”

Watch the video:

 

 

Follow further developments on twitter by following #OscarPistorius:


 

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Wilbur Smith Reignites Cecil the Lion Controversy

Golden LionIn an interview with the UK’s Observer, bestselling author Wilbur Smith says he believes Cecil the lion’s killer probably “did his offspring and his pride a favour”.

The black-maned lion was killed by Walter Palmer, a dentist from Minnesota in the United States, near the Hwange National Park in Zimbabwe on 1 July, causing a major public outcry. The lion had been collared by researchers from Oxford University, although shooting a collared lion is not illegal. The Zimbabwean authorities are however seeking to prosecute Palmer for allegedly hunting without the correct permit.

Smith was a keen hunter himself, although at 82 he says he does not hunt any more, and many of his novels involve big game hunts. Similarly to Palmer, Smith has been photographed proudly displaying his big game kills.

Read an excerpt from the interview:

I don’t hunt any more, mostly because I discovered buffalo run faster than I do. I hunted because it was the right thing to do. Game was a very valuable asset to local people, and for that reason there is still game in those regions.

Poor Cecil the lion was 18 years old, losing his teeth and going downhill fast. The American dentist probably did his offspring and his pride a favour.

However, Brent Staplekamp, a researcher from Oxford tells The Guardian:

“Smith says Cecil was 18 and his teeth were all but finished. That’s wrong. Cecil was in his prime. He was 12,” Brent Staplekamp said. “So 12 might be quite old in terms of what we see in Hwange where lions are shot at so much by hunters, but Cecil still had a good few years to go and his teeth were perfect.”

Related:

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2015 Open Book: Rhodes Must Fall Assembly and Performance Poetry with Antjie Krog (Saturday, 10 AM)

Antjie Krog, RA Villanueva and Katleho Shoro

 
It’s a glorious Saturday morning at the 2015 Open Book Festival!

Piggy Boy's BluesMede-weteReliquaria

 
Erin tweeted from “Performance Poetry and Academia” with Katleho Shoro, RA Villanueva and Antjie Krog:


 
Helené covered the #RhodesMustFall Assembly with Mbali Matandela (Rhodes Must Fall) and Nakhane Touré. The session was chaired by Thato Pule (RMF Trans Collective):


 

 
 

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The festival is being covered by Books LIVE editor Jennifer Malec (@projectjennifer), deputy editor Helené Prinsloo (@helenayp), assistant editors Erin Devenish (@ErinDevenish811) and Annetjie van Wynegaard (@Annetjievw).

Keep an eye on our Facebook page (Facebook.com/BooksLIVESA) and our Twitter profile (@BooksLIVESA) for more information and pictures!

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