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Archive for the ‘isiXhosa’ Category

uHlanga open to unsolicited submissions of poetry manuscripts in February 2017

uHlanga New Poets Series Launches with Collections by Genna Gardini and Thabo Jijana
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Calling all poets!

For the first time, uHlanga will be open for submissions of unsolicited manuscripts of poetry for the month of February 2017.

The press will be accepting submissions of any book length in English, isiZulu, isiXhosa, Afrikaans, or a combination of those languages. Poets must either be South African or permanent residents of South Africa.

uHlanga are the publishers of Nick Mulgrew, Genna Gardini, Thabo Jijana, Helen Moffett, Stephen Symons and Rosa Lyster.

Jijana won the 2016 Ingrid Jonker Prize for his collection, Failing Maths and My Other Crimes.

Read: uHlanga Press Poetry Special, Featuring Thabo Jijana, Genna Gardini and Nick Mulgrew

* * * * *

Read the submission guidelines:

uHlanga does not accept unsolicited poems or manuscripts for publication outside of our announced reading periods.

Our first open submissions period for original chapbooks and collections of poetry from South African poets, or poets living in South Africa, will take place from 1 February to 28 February 2017. Manuscripts must be predominantly written in English, Zulu, Xhosa, Afrikaans, or a combination of those languages. Every manuscript will be read, and all will be considered for publication.

There is no indicated length for manuscripts, although most books published by uHlanga contain 20-40 poems. (Manuscripts envisioned as chapbooks, for example, may be shorter, while epic poetry may contain very few poems.) The more coherent, structured and economical your manuscript is, the higher the chance of it being published – so do not simply include every poem you have ever written. Successful manuscripts will be published in the manner and format – eg full collection, chapbook – that uHlanga deems most appropriate for the content.

Please note that anthologies or retrospective collections will not be accepted. Manuscripts containing poems previously published in magazines, anthologies, journals, or online will be accepted, as long as each previously-published poem is acknowledged in the manuscript, and as long as the writer has the rights to reprint such poems. Manuscripts that have already been published previously as a whole will not be accepted.

We accept manuscripts from writers of any experience, whether they have published a collection of poetry before or not. The only criterium for eligibility is that writers either be South African, or a permanent resident of South Africa.

Only writers of successful submissions will be replied to, and will be offered our standard contract. Please note that this is not a competition: we reserve the right to publish none of the manuscripts received during this submissions period.

Submissions will only be accepted through our email address, submissions@uhlangapress.co.za, as either .doc or .pdf attachments, with all text in Times New Roman. Include your name and contact information on a cover letter attached alongside the manuscript. Being familiar with our books is essential: feel free to mention to us why you think your manuscript will be a good fit for uHlanga.

There is no reading fee. Agented submissions are discouraged, but not strictly disallowed.

Do not submit your manuscript before 1 February 2017 or after 28 February 2017 – it will be discarded without being read. Good luck!
Where can I publish poetry outside of reading periods?

Your best way to get noticed by us is to be an active poet, publishing as many poems in as many places as you can. There are a number of excellent periodicals and websites in South(ern) Africa that accept unsolicited poems for publication. Here are the periodicals that uHlanga reads most often:

Prufrock
Aerodrome
New Contrast
Stanzas
New Coin
The Kalahari Review

You likely won’t publish any poems, however, if you don’t read poems! Support local literary magazines.

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Download a free children’s story – available in 11 official languages – and pass on the power of stories this World Read Aloud Day

 
National reading-for-enjoyment campaign Nal’ibali has teamed up with Yvonne Chaka Chaka for World Read Aloud Day on 24 February, 2016.

Last year, with the support of hundreds of South Africans, Nal’ibali read aloud to over 166 000 children and it hopes to double or even triple that number this year.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka will be giving her own special reading of Neo and the Big Wide World in isiZulu to children at Orlando Stadium in Soweto.

In addition, Orlando Pirates Football Club will launch its Reading Stars Programme.

Scroll down to find out more and download the book.

 

“If we want our children to grow up as strong and powerful readers, we must demonstrate reading for them,” Nal’ibali managing director Jade Jacobsohn says. “When you read aloud to a child, you show them what reading looks like and how to make sense of text. Exposing them to new words and expressions used in stories helps to develop their vocabularies and provides a rich pool of language for children to draw from when they want to read and write on their own.”

Carole Bloch, executive director of PRAESA (the Project for the Study of Alternative Education), a co-founder of Nal’ibali, adds: “The power of reading aloud to children is incredible. Not only is it richly rewarding and enjoyable for any age, it is also the way we establish the foundational, knowledge and motivation young children need as they are learning to read – and indeed for all learning.

 

“There are over 17 000 000 children in South Africa with only around 5 percent being read to by their caregivers. World Read Aloud Day celebrates the joy of sharing a good story and we hope that even more adults in South Africa will join us this year. Then let’s grow that 5 percent to 50 percent by continuing to explore books and stories throughout the year.”

How to get involved

This year’s special story, Neo and the Big Wide World, by Vianne Venter and illustrated by Rico of Madam and Eve Fame, is freely available for download from Nal’ibali’s web and mobisites.

Members of the public can also sign up on these sites to share how many children they will be reading to, and stand the chance to win one of four Bargain Books hampers worth R1 000 each!

 

Neo and the Big Wide World is available in all 11 official languages, and a further two: it will be available in Braille in the February edition of Blind SA’s youth magazine, while Sign Language Education and Development (SLED) has collaborated with Story Bosso runners up Kerrin Kokot and Jayne Batzofin to produce a signed video of the story which can be viewed on the Nal’ibali website.

The story will also appear in a commemorative edition of the Nal’ibali’s supplement produced in partnership with PRAESA and media partner Times Media.

 

You can access the World Read Aloud Day story online here:

And for a burst of storytelling inspiration, listen to Yvonne Chaka Chaka reading the story in English and isiZulu!


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Nal’ibali calls for more books in local languages for International Mother Language Day

 
Knowledge is power. Where do we keep knowledge? Books! So lots of books means … lots of power!

This is the central message of an inspiring new video produced by Nal’ibali, the national reading-for-enjoyment campaign, with which they are launching their call for more books in South African languages.

The call is made as part of the Nal’ibali celebration of International Mother Language Day, happening on 21 February. This year’s theme, as selected by the UN, will be “Quality education, language(s) of instruction and learning outcomes”.

All children deserve to learn to read, and to be read to in the language that they are most familiar with and comfortable in. In this way their experiences of books and stories become far richer through greater comprehension of the tales within. This is a crucial component in building children’s motivation to read, a desire which we know has significant implications for their future learning success. – Jade Jacobsohn, Managing Director of the Nal’ibali campaign.

A look at the Children’s Book Availability Report by The South African Publications Network (SAPnet) reveals that very few children are able to read books in their mother tongues owing to a lack of such books:

Between 2000 and 2015, 53 599 children’s books were published in South Africa. Of these 21 714 were English (40%), 12 934 were Afrikaans (24%), 3 638 isiXhosa (6%), 3561 isiZulu (6%), 2 341 Setswana (4%), 2 273 Sepedi (4%), 2 200 Sesotho (4%), 1 309 Xitsonga (2%); 1 144 Tshivenda (2%), 1 119 Siswati (2%) and 912 isiNdebele (1%). This does not take into account the number of these books that are school textbooks. The remaining books published were dictionaries.

 

Watch the video and be inspired to heed to Nal’ibali’s call for an increase in the production and distribution of books in indigenous languages:

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Related story:

 

Press release

Nal’ibali launches powerful PSA this International Mother Languages Day

Highlighting the critical lack of books available in all African languages to children in South Africa, Nal’ibali, the national reading-for-enjoyment campaign, has produced a powerful public service announcement that illustrates the breakdown of books available per language and calls for support for African language reading materials for children. The video has been developed in recognition of International Mother Languages Day on Sunday, 21 February.

“All children deserve to learn to read, and to be read to in the language that they are most familiar with and comfortable in. In this way their experiences of books and stories become far richer through greater comprehension of the tales within. This is a crucial component in building children’s motivation to read, a desire which we know has significant implications for their future learning success,” explains Jade Jacobsohn, Managing Director of the Nal’ibali campaign.

“Without this, many African language speaking children are likely to continue to find learning to read and write a burdensome and difficult task. The accelerated growth and use of a multilingual children’s literature is a sign of appreciation of and care for the cultural and educational interests of all children. It also offers the chance to embrace diversity and grow common understandings”, adds Carole Bloch, Executive Director of PRAESA (the Project for the Study of Alternative Education in South Africa) cofounder and literacy content and quality assurance partner of Nal’ibali.

What motivates children to read? Research has shown that choice and relevance are two of the most critical components. When children can choose from a wide selection of books and stories that they understand, inspire them and are relevant to their lives, they are more likely to want to read.

However, a recent report issued by SAPnet (The South African Publications Network) shows that of the total number of books published in South Africa between the year 2000 and 2015, 40% of these were in English, 24% in Afrikaans and just 6% in isiXhosa and isiZulu. The remaining official languages were represented with percentages smaller than six. Most notably, the percentage of books for isiNdebele is just 1%*, an alarmingly small portion of books given the population breakdown per language.

It is also important to note that these figures do not take into account the number of books that are school textbooks, as this would further reduce the number of books available.

“We want our children to grow up to be strong and powerful readers, and to have the best chance of success in the classroom and in the workforce. We need to increase quantity and access to literacy materials in all languages. We need to start by promoting the importance of mother tongue languages and celebrating them,” concludes Jacobsohn.

Using languages which people understand deeply plays an important role in social and economic development. African languages must be accorded cultural capital. Nal’ibali would like to thank SAPnet and the Cape Town Central Library for their kind support in the production of the video and the Nal’ibali campaign.

For more information about the Nal’ibali campaign, to watch the video or to access children’s in a range of South African languages, visit www.nalibali.org and www.nalibali.mobi. You can also find them on Facebook and Twitter: nalibaliSA.

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2016 Puku Story Festival to focus on decolonising the literary landscape (Grahamstown, 18 – 21 February)

Chasing The Tails of My Father’s CattleThe Ugly DucklingSindiwe Magona - Climbing HigherFrom Robben Island to BishopscourtTo My Children's Children
Haai Zoleka!Umcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaHave You Seen Zandile?Love ChildOur Story MagicStories of Africa

 
The Puku Story Festival will take place in Grahamstown from 18 – 21 February this year.

This year the festival will aim to take forward current debates about decolonising the literary landscape, inspired by Walter Rubusana’s book Zemk’iinkomo Magwalandini, an isiXhosa phrase with a literal meaning close to “The cattle are being stolen, you cowards!”, but the metaphoric meaning “preserve your heritage”.

This year, the Puku Story Festival has chosen to honour Sindiwe Magona, legendary writer, poet, dramatist, storyteller, actress and motivational speaker. A festival highlight will be daily performances of the play Mother to Mother, adapted from Magona’s book of the same name.

In addition, the National English Literary Museum (NELM) will partner with Grocott’s Mail to organise the book launch of Magona’s latest book Chasing the Tails of my Father’s Cattle.

Other events to look forward to are the annual book exhibition, which will be curated by NELM again this year, a poetry writing workshop in isiXhosa, led by Hleze Kunju, and the Iimbongi workshop led by the Rhodes University Department of African Language Studies.

Legendary storyteller Gcina Mhlophe will present a workshop on creative writing for children.

On Saturday, 20 February – International Mother Language Day – Magona will present a keynote address at the launch of a special catalogue on her work.

View the Puku Story Festival programme:

More information from the Puku Story Festival:

nullZemk’iinkomo Magwalandini!

The Puku Story Festival that will take place from 18 – 21 February 2016 will invoke Dr Walter Rubusana’s clarion call “Zemk’iinkomo Magwalandini” to take forward current debates about decolonising the literary landscape. This theme encourages us to interrogate the status of African literature today and to draw attention to the urgent need to develop and promote it for the benefit of current and future generations.

With this theme in mind, the Puku Story Festival has chosen to honour Dr Sindiwe Magona, one of this continent’s most prolific writers in both English and her mother tongue, isiXhosa. Her body of work covers all genres – fiction, non-fiction, poetry, novel, memoir, biography and children’s literature.

A very wise man said: “Only in his hometown, among his relatives and in his own house is a prophet without honour” (Mark 6:1-6). Is this true of Dr Sindiwe Magona? Internationally acclaimed, with books translated into many languages, is she sufficiently appreciated in her own linguistic community? Are her books available in the schools and libraries of the Eastern Cape, the province of her birth? Do we appreciate our local writers? And if not, what can we do about it? These are the questions that will be interrogated by writers, storytellers, poets and praise singers at the Puku Story Festival.

This tribute to Dr Magona will take the form of author conversations, a book exhibition, poetry and storytelling sessions, a theatre production, workshops and a church service.

A highlight of the festival will be daily performances of the play Mother to Mother. The play, was adapted from Sindiwe Magona’s book of the same name by the award-winning actress Thembi Mtshali-Jones, celebrated director Janice Honeyman and the author herself. The poignant and powerful play has been a worldwide success. Thembi Mtshali-Jones performances at the Puku Story Festival are significant because it will be the first time the play is performed in isiXhosa before Eastern Cape audiences. The high school students, who make up the bulk of the audiences, will benefit from seeing the theatre adaptation of one of their English setbooks. Post-performance discussions by the actress and the author will give the young people insights into the presentation of a story in a different platform and a different language.

As has been the case last year, the programme has been carefully crafted to cater for different audiences – children of all ages, parents, teachers, librarians, writers and publishers, literacy and reading promotion organisations, language, literacy and heritage activists, academics, storytellers, media and the general public.

The book exhibition will again be curated by the National English Literary Museum (NELM). Workshops continue to form an integral part of the programme. NELM will also partner with Grocott’s Mail to organise the book launch of Dr Magona’s latest book Chasing the Tails of my Father’s Cattle.

By popular demand last year’s workshops will be repeated – poetry writing in isiXhosa by Hleze Kunju and the Iimbongi workshop by Rhodes University Department of African Language Studies. In addition SABC Head of Children’s Content Dr Nokuthula Msimang and Senior Producer at Ochre Productions Nomvuyo Mzamane will present a workshop on writing for children across multiple platforms. The ever-popular Gcina Mhlophe will present a workshop on creative writing for children. Early childhood and foundation phase teachers will be the main target group for these workshops.

The influence of headline sponsor REDISA (Recycling and Development Initiative of South Africa) will be evident in the environmental focus of the festival. Through a partnership with the Embassy of Switzerland and REDISA, Puku will be organising a series of workshops that will bring together environmental activists, writers, publishers to generate literature to increase environmental consciousness among children and their educators. The first of these workshops will be held at the Puku Story Festival and will focus on environmental content in isiXhosa.

Successful elements of the previous festival – tours of the Eastern Star gallery, visits to the optometrist for eye-screening, storytelling and games – will be repeated, as will the International Mother Language Day celebration. This will take place on Saturday 20 February and will feature a keynote address by Sindiwe Magona and the launch of a special catalogue on her work.

Puku will continue the tradition of closing the Festival with a church service at St Philip’s Church in Fingo township.

Partnerships with the National Arts Festival, Rhodes University, the Nelson Mandela Institute of Rural Development and Education at Fort Hare, the Fingo Festival and a host of education and literacy organisations have seen the Puku Story Festival grow from the inaugural edition in September 2013 to an annual event every February. The 2015 Puku Story Festival earned a BASA award for its main sponsor, REDISA.

The Festival aims to spark children’s interest in storytelling and reading in isiXhosa, to provide a platform for collaboration and communication between producers and consumers of literature for children and teenagers, to enable publisher and writers to exhibit their product and to increase availability of isiXhosa books to materially deprived and marginalised communities.

Past sponsors of the Puku Story Festival include REDISA, Department of Arts and Culture’s Mzansi Golden Economy Fund, National Arts Council, Business and Arts South Africa, Convergence Partners, the Motsepe Foundation, Thebe Investments, SASOL, African General Equity group and South Africa Partners.

Puku Story Festival isiXhosa programme:

2016 Puku Story Festival isiXhosa programme


 

 
Puku Story Festival English programme:

2016 Puku Story Festival English programme


 

Book details


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Presenting the winners of the 2015/2016 Western Cape Cultural Affairs Awards

 
Last week, the 2015/2016 Western Cape Cultural Affairs Awards were presented to individuals and organisations who make positive contributions in the province.

Awards were given in different categories, including Arts and Culture, Museums, Language, Heritage, Libraries, Archives and Geographical Names. Three special Minister’s Awards were also presented.

Among the winners were Lyrical Base Project, “for the work that they do in the development of young poets and writers”; Ria Olivier, who took home the Neville Alexander Award for the Promotion of Multilingualism and Watu Kobese, who won the Best contribution to Language Development for his development of the isiXhosa terminology for chess pieces and moves, a first of its kind initiative.

Five library awards were handed out, with Bellville Public Library winning Best Large Public Library, as a “shining example of moving with the times and adapting to the changing demographics and effects of urbanisation”.

Western Cape Cultural Affairs and Sport Minister Anroux Marais congratulated all winners and nominees on the evening, saying: “These awards offer an opportunity to acknowledge the diversity of the cultural landscape with great pride.

“Celebrate our colourful Western Cape Province with us tonight. Feel and be proud of our historical, cultural and linguistic heritage. I believe our beauty lies in our diversity. The things we have in common are more than those things that set us apart, and the sooner we all realise this, the better.

“We need to get to a point where we understand and tolerate each other regardless of our differences. We need to get to a point where we celebrate our diversity and work together towards a socially inclusive nation.”

 

Read the press release to see who took home the prizes:

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The Western Cape Cultural Affairs Awards are held annually to celebrate individuals and organisations in the Western Cape who make a positive contribution in the Cultural Affairs sector. Awards have been given to organisations and individuals who have made a profound impact within the Arts, Culture, Language, Heritage, Museums, Archives, Geographical Names and Libraries sectors in the province over the years.

Below are the 2015/16 award winners in each category:

ARTS AND CULTURE
 

  • 1. Best contribution to Visual Arts, including Public Arts

Central Art Library, for the work they are doing in the field of visual arts and public arts, which is evident in their creative expression of different visual art exhibitions held in the Central Library gallery.

  • 2. Best contribution to Performing Arts: Dance

Sbonakaliso Ndaba, a performer, choreographer and a teacher that has been on the fore-front of the developing contemporary African dance in the Western Cape. Her current work with Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership is evident of her expertise in the field of contemporary dance and has become a driving force behind this initiative.

  • 3. Best contribution to Performing Arts: Drama

Thamsanqa “Tamie” Mbongo, Thamsamqa has contributed extensively in the development of Drama in various communities in the Western Cape over the years. He has achieved this through individual and collaborative projects and programmes with various stakeholders.

  • 4. Best contribution to the Performing Arts: Music

David Wickham, contributed to the development and popularisation of Steelbands in the urban and rural communities of the Western Cape. the bands that he has developed can be found in areas such as Riebeek Kasteel, Vredenberg, Clan William, Langa and Mithcell’s Plain.

and

Lungile Jacobs, has contributed extensively to the development of Choral Music in the Western Cape. He was also instrumental in the formation of WCCMA and CMFSA which are organisations that advocate and lobby for choral music provincially and nationally.

  • 5. Best contribution to the Literary Arts (including poetry, prose, play-writing)

Lyrical Base Project, for the work that they do in the development of young poets and writers. The project is also engaged in developing spoken word writers among primary school children, and also assists them with reading and writing.

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  • 6. Best contribution to Crafts and/or Design

Mark Jeneker, is well-established and an accomplished crafter himself. He does sustainable work in terms of development arts and crafts. One of his projects includes arts and crafts classes at the Central Art Library.

  • 7. Best contribution to the promotion of Cultural Activities

Balu Nuvision, has done impressive work in the development of the arts in the Western Cape in the past 30 years. She is both a teacher and an arts activist; she’s also been part of the formation of Indoni Dance Arts and Leadership

and

Brenda Skelenge, a teacher and a cultural activist. The work that she does focuses on bringing tourists to cultural and creative events in Khayelitsha. She is also using her house as a cultural hub where people can come and listen or watch performances from various local and established performers and music bands.

  • 8. Best Project: Disability in the Visual, Performing and Literary Arts

Unmute Dance Company, a mixed ability dance group, the only integrated contemporary dance company currently active in the Western Cape.

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  • 9. Best project to Promote and Preserve an Indigenous Art Form

Die Nuwe Graskoue Trappers, traditional Riel Dance is recognised as the oldest dance form in South Africa and a creative cultural expression. The revival of traditional Riel dance in and around Wupperthal is a community initiative. The troupe made their debut with much success at the annual Riel Dance Championship final in December 2013, where they became the ATKV Junior Riel Dance Champions 2013. In April 2015 they qualified for the South Africa Champions of Performing Arts and came home with “Grand Champion Award 2015” for “Best Group performance” as well as four gold Medals and the “Overall Trophy Award”

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MUSEUMS
 

  • 1. Best Museum

Genadendal Mission Museum for the work done by their Youth Forum, which was launched on International Museums Day. The forum meets every second Saturday, and was involved in setting up and planning the 2015 annual Heritage Day exhibition opening. Special focus was placed on the youth and what they could take away from their experience in the group and getting more involved at the Genadendal Museum.

  • 2. Best New Museum Project

Music van de Caab Exhibition, Solms-Delta Wine Estate, well known as one of the country’s most progressive wine estates. In 2005 they established the Wijn de Caab Trust to benefit the 200 historically disadvantaged residents and employees. A major part of the transformation was the opening of a Museum in October 2005 which tells the stories of the indigenous inhabitants, colonial setters, slaves and the experiences of apartheid of the present day workers on the farm.

  • 3. Best Museum Volunteer

Dr I Balie, who is still actively involved in guiding visitors and tour groups, where and when needed at the Museum. Some visiting groups specifically requested to have Dr Balie as their tour guide. With his extensive knowledge of all artefacts on displays he still plays a key role in the digitization of the collection by guiding the auditing staff members.

 
LANGUAGE
 

  • 1. Neville Alexander Award for the Promotion of Multilingualism

Ria Olivier, served as chair of the Western Cape Language Committee for the past three years. As member, she is a very proactive activist for language rights, specifically Afrikaans. Hard working behind the scenes, Ria Olivier promotes bilingualism, especially for isiXhosa.

  • 2. Best contribution to Language Development

Watu Kobese, identified a need for a Chess booklet in isiXhosa and worked together with the Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport to develop the isiXhosa terminology for chess pieces and moves, a first of its kind initiative.

 
HERITAGE
 

  • 1. Best Heritage Project

Dr Jayson Orton, Namakwa Sands, for his work at the Namakwa Sands Mine on the west coast of the Western Cape. Dr Orson conducted a program of survey and excavation across the property, turning a cultural resource management project into a research project. He went beyond expectations in his mitigation of mining impacts in Namaqualand by converting the rescue excavation into a sustainable research project.

  • 2. Best Heritage Impact Assessment or Heritage Report

Chris Snelling for Paardevlei Precint 3 HIA, This HIA (Heritage Impact Assessment) is regarded as an excellent current example of its type. It effectively integrates structures, landscapes and context into an understanding of the significance of heritage resources.

 
LIBRARIES
 

  • 1. Best Public Library: Children’s Services

Mount Pleasant Public Library for the Reading project they intensively continued with this year. Despite a limited staff component and room space they were able to help the children of the community with their reading abilities.

  • 2. Best Public Library: Youth Services

Kensington Public Library, for the significant strides made in contributing towards the development of the community, particularly the youth, offering opportunities like the sewing club, computer literacy and a career expo.

  • 3. Best Small Public Library (1-3 staff members)

Prince Albert Library. Despite the fact that this was the only nomination, Prince Albert Public Library impressed the panel with the overwhelming support they received from the local community with the nomination. The help they provided to the animal welfare society as well as their support to the library in the local prison were much appreciated. They did exceptionally well during the annual Leesfees.

  • 4. Best Medium-sized Public Library (4-8 staff members)

Masiphumulele Public Library, City of Cape Town, they have grown in leaps and bounds in the last couple of years, with amazing projects from Fine Arts to Ikama Youth partnership, as well as reaching out internationally.

  • 5. Best Large Public Library (9+ staff members)

Bellville Public Library, City of Cape Town, a shining example of moving with the times and adapting to the changing demographics and effects of urbanisation. Out of the box thinking like the Takeaways Services to deal with the parking challenges; the outreach in the Home Affairs Queue; and the amazing work that they are doing living up to their motto ‘Sensational Customer Service’.

 
ARCHIVES
 

  • 1. Archives Advocacy Award

Archival Platform, a Civil Society organisation that is committed to deepening democracy through the use of memory and Archives as dynamic public resources. They conduct research in various aspects of Archives and Records management.

  • 2. Most Influential Person in Records Management

Juliana Vercueil and the Registry Team, Western Cape Liquor Authority, which is a newly established organisation, and within the three years since its establishment, Ms Vercueil and her team has established a fully functioning Registry unit within the Authority. She has also been involved in a specialised project that needed to be complete in a short period of time, which is commendable.

  • 3. Best Contributor to Archival Heritage

Erika le Roux and the Client Information Services of Western Cape Archives and Records Service, their greatest contribution lies in a well-organised reading room, their interaction with the researchers and support to them. First- hand knowledge are shared. They incite researchers to come back due to the service provided, including research support. There is a great knowledge of information capsulated in data resources. On a day to day basis they promote the Archives with enthusiasm and professionalism.

 
GEOGRAPHICAL NAMES
 

  • 1. Best contribution to the Standardisation and/or Public Awareness of Geographical Names

The Naming Committee, (Brett Herron, Chair) and the Public Participation Unit of the City of Cape Town, for their work done to ensure that an extensive public participation process was conducted to invite names for the seven unnamed footbridges over Nelson Mandela Boulevard and Rhodes Avenue. They initiated and followed through an extensive consultation campaign involving all players to name the seven bridges. The final choice represents the most diverse set of names, reflecting the city’s diverse history, heritage and culture.

 
MINISTER’S SPECIAL AWARDS
 

  • 1. Outstanding Achievement of Women in the Arts and Culture, Language, Heritage, Geographical Names, Museums, Libraries or Archives

Balu Nivision, for her tireless commitment to the community via the creative arts, thereby effecting change in traumatised individuals and communities plagued by adversity. She co-founded the INDONI ACADEMY, which helps to transform the lives of young people. She does therapeutic interventions with the use of dance, music therapy and art.

  • 2. Outstanding Achievement of Youth in Arts and Culture, Language, Heritage, Geographical Names, Museums, Libraries or Archives

Kronendal Music Academy of Hout Bay, for their long-term commitment to caring for the needs of children from all walks of like, which helps to create cross cultural solidarity. They provide a home away from home for children from troubled backgrounds, where they can be nourished physically and emotionally. They are consistently innovating new ways to improve their service to the Hout Bay Community.

  • 3. Lifetime Achievement in Arts and Culture, Language, Heritage, Geographical Names, Museums, Libraries or Archives

Jennifer van Papendorp, who has worked in the Arts and Culture field in the Western Cape since 1981 and for the past 34 years has contributed in many ways. She has worked as a dancer with Jazzart Dance Theatre, Southern women, Abamanyani, and Somatic Jam. She has taught thousands of young people, adults and teachers over the years. She has lectured in movement and Dance Technique and Theory for the Western Cape Tertiary institutions. She also served as a WCED principle Subject Advisor and Curriculum planner in Arts and Culture and Dance Studies. She co-established the first Artscape Schools Festival and produced a number of public performances for the Focus School learners in professional theatres. She also collaborated with the Department of Culture Affairs and Sport in helping to set up and supervise the WCED branch of the MOD dance programme in seven schools.

  • 4. National and International Contributions in Arts and Culture, Language, Heritage, Geographical Names, Museums, Libraries or Archives

Die Nuwe Graskoue Trappers, Traditional Riel Dance is recognised as the oldest dance form in South Africa and a creative cultural expression. The revival of traditional Riel dance in and around Wupperthal is a community initiative. The troupe made their debut with much success at the annual Riel Dance Championship final in December 2013, where they became the ATKV Junior Riel Dance Champions 2013. In April 2015 they qualified for the south Africa Champions of Performing Arts and came home with “Grand Champion Award 2015” for “Best Group performance” as well as four gold Medals and the “Overall Trophy Award”

Minister Marais congratulated all winners and nominees on the evening, and said “These awards offer an opportunity to acknowledge the diversity of the cultural landscape with great pride. Celebrate our colourful Western Cape Province with us tonight. Feel and be proud of our historical, cultural and linguistic heritage. I believe our beauty lies in our diversity. The things we have in common are more than those things that set us apart, and the sooner we all realise this, the better. We need to get to a point where we understand and tolerate each other regardless of our differences. We need to get to a point where we celebrate our diversity and work together towards a socially inclusive nation.”

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Winners of the 2015 Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards

Conny Masocha Lubisi

 
Alert! The winners of the 2015 Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards (MMLLA) were announced at the Pearson head offices in Cape Town last night.

The MMLLA was launched in 2006 by Maskew Miller Longman as their commitment to develop quality literature in all official languages for young readers and to encourage a love of reading in learners’ mother tongue.

The competition acts as a platform to encourage and provide support for aspiring writers who wish to produce literary work in the language of their choice. It remains the only literature competition that gives equal weighting to all 11 official South African languages, reflecting the commitment to developing quality literature in all official languages for young readers.

The competition explores a different genre each year. In 2015 a call was made for Children’s Fiction and a total of 122 entries were received, with 50 percent being written in African languages.

Finalists include a teacher with a passion for theatre, freelance translator, freelance journalists and writers, a church leader with a focus on the youth, and a community project member who helps children discover nature through art. Among the 8 finalists there are debut as well as multi-award-winning writers.

Dianne Case

 

Before the prizegiving, celebrated children’s and young adult author Diane Case delivered the keynote address. She was the English winner in the MML Literature Awards 2007.

Katy of Sky RoadAlbatross Winter92 Queens RoadLove, David

 
Spending time with children, which is something she does often as a very active grandmother and involved community member, and her own childhood memories inform Case’s emphatic stories. She shared many touching anecdotes to give examples and stressed throughout her address that “children are not stupid”.

Through witnessing kids’ reactions to not only her stories but other South African narratives too, Case has found enough evidence to say with authority that localised stories – especially those told in a child’s mother tongue – make children feel relevant and help them to articulate their South African world.

Her books tend to create empathy in readers and offer a glimpse of what life was, and in some respects still is, for many people in South Africa. Her first novel, Albatross Winter, was published by Maskew Miller Longman in 1983.

After Case’s spirited address, Brian Wafawarowa, Pearson SA Executive Director for Learning Resources took the stage to announce the winners and present them with their books, hot off the press.

Without further ado, here are the winners of the 2015 Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards (in alphabetical order):

 

  • Jelleke Wierenga for Mensekind teen die monstervlieg (Afrikaans)
  • Bridget Pitt for The Night of the Go-away Birds (English)
  • Sipho Richard Kekezwa for Icebo Likamalusi (isiXhosa)
  • Emmanuel Nkosinathi Nazo for Imbewu Yomuthi Obabayo (isiZulu)
  • Mabonchi Goodwill Motimele for La Fata Gal Le Boe Fela (Sepedi)
  • Thatayaone Raymond Dire for Ngwana Sejo o a Tlhakanelwa (Setswana)
  • Tshifhiwa Given Mukwevho for Mveledzo na Zwighevhenga (Tshivenda)
  • Conny Masocha Lubisi for Xixima (Xitsonga)

 
Read about each of these authors and their books:

2015 Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards

 

2015 Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards – Biographies of Winners

 

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Helené Prinsloo (@helenayp) tweeted live from the launch using the hashtag #livebooks:


 

 
Press Release

Aspiring writers give South African children the gift of reading in their mother tongue

Pearson South Africa will host the Maskew Miller Longman (MML) Literature Awards on Wednesday, 25 November 2015, 17:00-21:00 at its Auto Atlantic Office in Cape Town to announce the winners of this national literature competition. Annually, Pearson invites experienced, new and aspiring writers to submit their original, unpublished stories in their mother tongue to develop quality literature in all of the official South African languages.

The competition judges had the difficult decision of selecting only 8 finalists, from hundreds of submissions received for children’s stories aged 9 to 12. Many of whom work in other industries unrelated to writing and awarded them the opportunity to follow their passion and see their dreams realised.

Tshifhiwa Given Mukwevho, a freelance journalist and one of the (Tshivenda) finalists said: “I have found the MML Awards to be a strong foundation and basement for writers (like me) who still see writing in indigenous languages as a cause worth establishing and celebrating.”

In support of the writers, Pearson hosted a free writer’s workshop in February 2015. The workshop was hosted by Niki Daly, renowned author and illustrator who is respected in the industry for his contribution to children’s fiction and art. The 2014 MML Awards Tshivenda winner, Khalirendwe Nekhavhambe attended and workshop and remarked that it had provided her with invaluable knowledge and skills that left her feeling empowered, motivated and confident as a writer.

Brian Wafawarowa, Pearson SA Executive Director for Learning Resources says: “We are proud to be a part of this annual celebration of ethnic language literature in South Africa’s official languages. Literature is an important element in improving literacy in our country, we encourage people to read and enjoy literature in their mother tongue. We support all initiatives that will help to improve education in some way.”

Award-winning South African author, Dianne Case will be the guest speaker at this year’s Awards ceremony. She has written several successful children’s books.

A prize of R7 500 will be awarded to each winner and will be considered for publication by Pearson. A prize of R3500 will be awarded to each finalist.

Next year the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Awards will celebrate literature for teenagers. YA authors of all South African languages, start writing! Keep an eye on Books LIVE for information on how you can enter.

Congratulations to the 2015 winners!

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In Celebration of International Dictionary Day: 13 New and Revised Indigenous Language Dictionaries to be Published

International Dictionary Day is celebrated annually on 16 October, which is tomorrow.

This day was established in tribute to the famous American dictionary writer, Noah Webster, who was born on 16 October 1758. He is heralded as the father of the modern dictionary.

The South African National Lexicography Units, one for every official South African language, will be celebrating this important day – and the importance of dictionaries in general – by starting the release of no fewer than 13 new or revised editions of indigenous language monolingual, and indigenous language bilingual dictionaries. By the end of November all 13 new dictionaries will have been published.

The Lexicography Units were established by the Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) in 2001 to focus on lexicography and terminology development in South Africa, their task being to compile monolingual explanatory dictionaries and other products to help with language development. Each unit is managed by a board of directors and registered as a Section 21 (not-for-profit) company, which allows the unit autonomy to raise funds to carry on its work.

For more information on the new dictionaries, read the press release below:

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SALU

 
The eleven South African National Lexicography Units (one per official language) are the structures of state Constitutionally and Legislatively mandated, in the case of our indigenous languages, to produce dictionaries and other material that will “elevate their status and advance their use”.

While the Units are national entities they are based in the province or provincial district in which their language predominates, but the result of their work benefits all speakers and learners of the language no matter where they reside.
They are located as follows:

Xitsonga – Limpopo
Tshivenda – Limpopo
Sesotho sa Leboa – Limpopo
Siswati – Mpumalanga
isiNdebele – Gauteng / Mpumalanga
isiZulu – Kwa Zulu Natal
isiXhosa and English – Eastern Cape
Sesotho – Free State
Setswana – North West
Afrikaans – Western Cape

The nine indigenous language Units have recently formed an overarching structure – The South African National Lexicography Units – in order to:

Launch and maintain an awareness creation programme to inform the public and all government departments and agencies, including schools and tertiary education institutions, of the Units, their work, achievements and our new publication development plans.
Persuade the above agencies to implement and use our dictionaries, and to involve them – - in particular Government’s other indigenous language support and development structures, tertiary institutions, National and Provincial Departments of Education – in revisions of existing dictionaries and the identification of new projects which will elevate the status and increase the use of our languages.
Remind Government agencies of their Constitutional obligation to our indigenous languages and persuade the private sector to play an active role in this regard.
Co-ordination of the Units book development activities ensuring that no indigenous language, on the basis of having fewer speakers, is disadvantaged over any other language.

Our national awareness campaign was launched about five weeks ago and saw the attached poster, together with a covering letter, being distributed to all Honourable Members of Parliament, the NCOP and as of today six of our nine provincial Legislatures. The response has been most encouraging and we hope for a similar response from both government and the private sector.

International Dictionary Day

We are pleased to announce that between International Dictionary Day – 16th October 2015 – and the end of November 2015 no fewer than thirteen new or revised editions of indigenous language monolingual, and indigenous language bilingual dictionaries will be published. A further two dictionaries will be available early in 2016. It is the largest publishing event of its kind ever undertaken in our indigenous languages.

These are:

isiZulu English Bilingual Dictionary
isiNdebele Afrikaans English Trilingual Dictionary
isiNdebele Monolingual Dictionary
Tshivenda English Bilingual Dictionary
Tshivenda Monolingual Dictionary
Sesotho sa Leboa Monolingual Dictionary
Sesotho sa Leboa English Bilingual Dictionary
Setswana Monolingual Dictionary
Setswana English Bilingual Dictionary
Setswana Maths and Science English – Setswana Dictionary for Grades 4 to 9
Sesotho English Bilingual Dictionary
Xitsonga English Bilingual Dictionary
Xitsonga Monolingual Dictionaries

Due Early 2016

Siswati Monolingual Dictionary
Siswati English Bilingual Dictionary

These will add to the published dictionaries listed below:
isiXhosa Three Volume isiXhosa – Afrikaans – English Dictionary
isiXhosa One Volume Monolingual Dictionary
isiXhosa Maths and Science isiXhosa – English Dictionary for Grades 4 to 9
isiZulu Monolingual Dictionary R 275.00

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Nominees for the 2015 South African Literary Awards Revealed

In ligte laaieMy Children Have FacesnullnullLondon – Cape Town – JoburgMpho ya kaJustice
Girl on the EdgeSynapseMede-weteStrange PilgrimagesAl die lieflike dade
Maar wie snoei die rose in die nag?Die beste verhale en humor van Herman Charles BosmanThe New African

 
Alert! Books LIVE can exclusively reveal the nominees for the 10th annual South African Literary Awards (SALAs).

The SALAs honour writing and writers in all official languages across 10 categories, and include the K Sello Duiker Memorial Literary Award, the First-time Published Author Award and the Nadine Gordimer Short Story Award.

The SALAs were founded in 2005 by the wRite associates and the Department of Arts and Culture.

This year, Antjie Krog, Achmat Dangor and the late Thokozani Mandlenkosi Nene will receive Lifetime Achievement Literary Awards, while RRR Dhlomo and HIE Dhlomo will receive Literary Posthumous Awards.

Michele Magwood of the Sunday Times will receive the Literary Journalism Award.

The SALA ceremony will be held at the Tshwane Events Centre on November 7, 2015.

The full list of this year’s SALA nominees are:

Nominees for the 2015 South African Literary Awards Revealed

 
Congratulations to all the nominees!
 

Related stories:

Press release

Sala Celebrates 10 Years of Advancing Our Literary Heritage

Celebrating 10 years of growth and exhilarating success, the South African Literary Awards (SALA) will honour over 10 South African authors at a celebratory awards ceremony to be held at Tshwane Events Centre, Tshwane, Gauteng Province on November 7, 2015.

The prestigious South African Literary Awards were founded in 2005 by the wRite associates, in partnership with the national Department of Arts and Culture, as a platform to honour authors, writers, poets and literary practitioners who made and continue to make a contribution in the literary landscape in South Africa.

More than 100 luminaries have been honoured over the last decade, among them Nobel Award winner Nadine Gordimer, multi-award winning novelist Kgebetli Moele, literary journalists Bongani Madondo and Sabata-Mpho Mokae, poet Kobus Moolman, book critics Karabo Kgoleng and Jenny Crwys-Williams, short story writers Makhosazana Xaba and Reneilwe Malatji, scholars and prolific writers Zakes Mda, Mbulelo Mzamane, Ashraaf Kagee, Nhlanhla Maake, Imraan Coovadia, translator, poet, novelist and children’s writer Chris van Wyk, and many others.

The list of nominees reflects the transformative nature not only of SALA, but the country’s literary community. The potpourri nature of the country provides a canvas on which writers manage to paint beautiful pictures without needing to look over their shoulders.

SALA honours writing and writers in all official languages and writers across 10 categories. They are K Sello Duiker Memorial Literary Award, which is a celebration of one of the country’s most prolific authors of his generation, K Sello Duiker. First-time published writers are also acknowledged and honoured by the Awards. The other is the Nadine Gordimer Short Story Literary Award, honouring thespians in the genre, across all languages. In addition, there are:

1. Poetry Award
2. Literary Translators Award
3. Lifetime Achievement Literary Award
4. Posthumous Literary Award
5. Literary Journalism Award
6. Creative Non-Fiction Award and
7. Chairperson’s Award

As writers are given an equal opportunity to contest any of the awards categories, this year’s winners reflect that elevated state of South African literature, which has seen some of the local works adapted into screen- and stage-plays. South African literature is, indeed, on an upward spiral.

2015′s nominees are:

1. Jannie Malan
2. Carol Campbell
3. Matebello Innocentia Masasa
4. Nekhavhambe Khalirendwe
5. Zukiswa Wanner, LS Mokoena
6. Edwin Cameron
7. Ruth Carneson
8. Antjie Krog
9. Achmat Dangor
10. Thokozani Mandlenkosi Nene
11. Charl-Pierre Naudé
12. Mangaliso Buzani
13. Bishop MT Makobe
14. Karen Press
15. Johann de Lange
16. RRR and HIE Dhlomo
17. Michele Magwood and
18. Abraham H de Vries

The SALA has grown in leaps and bounds from when it started with only one category: the National Poet Laureate Prize and later followed by the Lifetime Achievement Literary Award, bestowed on luminaries across the land.

This year’s instalment will be outstanding and celebratory, as SALA will be preceded by a one-night live show, titled “AfreeLitMarts”, must-see exciting expertly choreographed multimedia live performance comprising music intersecting and interspersing storytelling, poetry, other literary performances, live painting, art, book, exhibitions and more.

For enquiries and more information:

Please visit www.sala.org.za and www.africacenturyconference.co.za OR write to info@writeassociates.co.za

OR call: 011 791 4102

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Zakes Mda, Mark Gevisser, Gcina Mhlophe, Pieter-Dirk Uys Join Unite Against Corruption Campaign

Rachel’s BlueLost and Found in JohannesburgUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaStukke teaterDavid KramerHandspring Puppet Company (hardcover)

 
Over 700 artists and almost 150 arts and culture organisations have joined the Unite Against Corruption Campaign, which is planning marches in Pretoria and Cape Town on Wednesday, 30 September.

Writers, actors, musicians and visual artists who have joined the campaign include Zakes Mda, Mark Gevisser, Gcina Mhlophe, Pieter-Dirk Uys, Karen Zoid, Jay Pather, David Kramer, Beezy Bailey, Thoko Ntshinga, Mbulelo Grootboom and Shaleen Surtie Richards, as have organisations such as the Handspring Puppet Company, the Cape Town Holocaust Centre and Vuyani Dance Theatre Project.

The Unite Against Corruption campaign, started by civil society organisations including Section 27, the Treatment Action Campaign and Equal Education, aims to “focus attention on rampant corruption within the public and private sectors”, as well as religious organisations, NGOs and sports federations.

More details:

Press release:

Artists United Against Corruption

More than 700 individual artists and nearly 150 arts and culture organisations have endorsed the Unite Against Corruption Campaign.

High profile writers, actors, musicians and visual artists including Zakes Mda, Mark Gevisser, Gcina Mhlophe, Pieter-Dirk Uys, Karen Zoid, Jay Pather, David Kramer, Beezy Bailey, Thoko Ntshinga, Mbulelo Grootboom and Shaleen Surtie Richards along with internationally acclaimed organisations such as the Handspring Puppet Theatre Company, the Cape Town Holocaust Centre and Vuyani Dance Theatre are among those who support the Campaign.

Unite Against Corruption was initiated by various civil society organisations such as Section 27, Treatment Action Campaign and Equal Education as well as trade unions to focus attention on rampant corruption within the public and private sectors, as well as within other social institutions, including religious organisations, NGOs and sports federations. The immediate focus of the Campaign are two marches planned for Pretoria and Cape Town on Wednesday 30 September. A list of demands is being prepared, and includes items such as a call for greater transparency of funding for political parties, better protection of the office of the Public Protector and lifestyle audits of senior government officials.

The arts and culture sector has rapidly supported this Campaign since artists are affected by corruption as much as others, both as citizens and as artists e.g. musicians being asked for payola in exchange for their music being broadcast on radio.

“Stakeholders within the arts and culture sector often do not raise issues of corruption for fear of alienating those who control public purse strings, access to opportunities and private sector sponsorships,” said poet and playwright Maishe Maponya, one of the first artist signatories.

Nadia Meer, Durban coordinator of Artists United Against Corruption explained that a key motivation for artists to be engaged in this Campaign “is to lobby for a mechanism to which issues of corruption, exploitation and abuse of artists may be reported anonymously for investigation and action”.

Artists have already participated in the Unite Against Corruption picket outside parliament on 7 August at the time of the debate on the Nhleko Report on Nkandla, and have created posters highlighting the lack of transparency in party political funding. A packed forum attended mainly by students was held at the Durban University of Technology on 16 September, launching the campaign in that city. Artists will participate creatively during and after the marches in Pretoria and Cape Town.

“Another of our aims is to encourage artists to link up with other sectors of society in addressing issues of concern to many South Africans, and to employ our creativity in doing so” said Gita Pather, the Gauteng facilitator of Artists United Against Corruption.

“We look forward to the Campaign contributing to greater organization of and social engagement within the arts and culture sector,” she said.

Three ad hoc Artists United Against Corruption committees exist in Johannesburg (coordinated by Gita Pather), Durban (coordinated by Nadia Meer) and Cape Town (coordinated by Mike van Graan) to help mobilise artists’ involvement in the Campaign, both in the actual marches, and in contributing creatively and/or financially to the Campaign.

For more details about the Campaign, go to www.uniteagainstcorruption.co.za, or email media@uniteagainstcorruption.co.za, or follow it on Twitter @UAC_Now or Facebook at www.facebook.com/UACNow.

To follow and engage with the arts and culture component of the Campaign, visit the soon-to-be-launched Facebook page: www.facebook.com/artistsunitedagainstcorruption.

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Presenting the 2015 IBBY SA Honour Roll

IBBY SA Honour List 2015-2016

 
Alert! IBBY SA have revealed their honour list for 2015-2016.

The South African section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY) announced the six titles on their 2015-2016 honour list – which will all be presented at the IBBY World Congress in New Zealand next year – during an event held in Pinelands, Cape Town yesterday afternoon.

IBBY is a non-profit organisation which represents an international network of people from all over the world who are committed to bringing books and children together. The biennial IBBY congress brings together IBBY members and other people involved in children’s books and reading development from all over the world. The congresses are excellent occasions to make contacts, exchange ideas and open horizons. Being showcased there opens up a world of possibilities for the South African authors, translators and illustrators who are selected.

The six books chosen by IBBY SA – during a very democratic and fair process, executive committee member Lona Gericke assured those present at the announcement – are:

UitMiscastHoe om jou draak te temUmcelo Neentsomi Zase-AfrikaBaile Le MoketaRhinocephants on the Roof

 
Both the titles selected in the English and Afrikaans categories address issues relating to teenage sexual identity in ways never before seen in South African youth literature. The Afrikaans translation brings the joys of the popular How to Train Your Dragon series to local kids, while the isiXhosa and seSotho translations make classic South African narratives available to children in their mother tongues. The illustrations in the chosen picture book brings a new dimension to local stories, offering a fresh way of looking at things from a child’s perspective. Read the press release below for more information on each of these precious books.

These books will now go on to be exhibited around the world at conferences and book fairs, and form part of permanent collections in some of the biggest international youth libraries.

Congratulations to those selected!

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Helené Prinsloo tweeted live from the announcement:


 

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Press release

IBBY SA is the South African national section of the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY), an international body with 74 national sections around the world.

IBBY SA is pleased to announce that the following books have been selected for the IBBY Honour List to be presented at the IBBY World Congress in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2016 as having made a special contribution to recent South African literature for children and young people:

Author: Afrikaans
Fanie Viljoen: Uit (LAPA Uitgewers, Pretoria) – for making it easy for all teenagers to experience and emphathise with a young man’s growing realisation of his sexual orientation

Author: English
Charmaine Kendal: Miscast (Junkets Publisher, Cape Town) – for its sensitive exploration of the inner journey of a trans boy; probably the first South African teen novel about transgender

Translator: into Afrikaans
Kobus Geldenhuys: Hoe om jou draak te tem (Protea Boekhuis, Stellenbosch) translated from Cressida Cowell’s How to Train Your Dragon – for capturing the spirit and sense of the fantastical in his translation

Translator: into isiXhosa
Sindiwe Magona: Umculo neentsomi zase-Afrika (University of KwaZulu-Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg) translated from Gcina Mhlophe’s Stories of Africa – for transmitting the magic of the original folktales so faithfully

Translator: into seSotho
Selloane Khosi: Baile le Moketa (Jacana Media, Johannesburg), translated from Gerard Sekoto’s Shorty and Billy Boy – for a clear and lively version of the 1973 story of Sekoto’s, only recently published for the first time.

Illustrator:
Dale Blankenaar: Olinosters op die dak / Rhinocephants on the roof by Marita van der Vyver (NB Publishers, Cape Town) – for his rendering of the eerily atmospheric world of the writing

The above announcements were made at an event hosted by IBBY SA at the SASNEV building in Pinelands, Cape Town, on Thursday 17 September 2015.

The announcements were made by Lona Gericke, former children’s librarian, former chair and vice-chair of IBBY SA, and a former member of the international Hans Christian Andersen Award Jury. She holds the Awards portfolio on the Executive Committee of IBBY SA. IBBY SA’s current Chairperson Professor Genevieve Hart handed over the certificates.

Five of the six people nominated were able to attend the event and receive their IBBY SA certificates in person. Likewise, five of the six publishers involved were the happy recipients of IBBY SA certificates.

“We are really glad that the six categories were spread among six different publishers,” said Lona Gericke. “It means that more and more publishers are doing excellent work in the field of literature for children and young people.”

Is there anything especially noteworthy about this year’s Honour List nominees? “Isn’t it striking,” commented Genevieve Hart, “that the two ‘Author’-category nominees have both written books about sexual diversity? It is a very significant area of teenager experience, and one welcomes such careful and sensitive treatments.”

What lies ahead for these six books? Copies have been despatched to the head office of IBBY in Basle, Switzerland. At next year’s IBBY World Congress they will be on display, will appear in the Honour List of Books brochure, and will be the subject of a screened presentation in a plenary session of the Congress, after which they will move on to be displayed at the famous Bologna Children’s Book Fair.

So, the recognition and the exposure for these writers, translators and illustrators could be very significant for their careers.

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