Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘isiZulu’ Category

Exclusive Books Homebru 2017 selection announced

Exclusive Books has announced their selection of fiction, non-fiction, cookery and children’s books for their annual Homebru campaign.

This year’s slogan was ‘books by us, written for you’. According to Ben Williams, general manager of Exclusive Books, the nearly fifty titles on the list “represent a highly engaging slice of current South African writing and life.”

With titles as diverse as Fred Strydom’s work of speculative fiction, The Inside-Out Man, Pieter-Louis Myburgh’s political analysis, The Republic of Gupta, and the colourful array of cookery and children’s books, including Khanyisa Malabi’s Legacy of Living and Sparkles of Taste and Carol-Ann Davids’ The Hair Fair, this year’s list certainly is representative of contemporary South African writing.

The titles which appear on the list are:

NON-FICTION

Confluence


Confluence: Beyond the River with Siseko Ntondini

by Piers Cruickshanks
 
 
 
 
 
Bending the RulesBending the Rules: Memoir of a Pioneering Diplomat
by Rafique Gangat
 
 
 
 
 
 
Making Africa WorkMaking Africa Work: A handbook for economic success
by Greg Mills, Jeffrey Herbst, Olusegun Obasanjo & Dickie Davis
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Republic of GuptaThe Republic of Gupta: A Story of State Capture
by Pieter-Louis Myburgh
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dreams, Betrayal and Hope Dreams, Betrayal and Hope
by Mamphela Ramphele
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apartheid Guns and MoneyApartheid, Guns and Money: A tale of profit
by Hennie Van Vuuren
 
 
 
 
 
 
Traces and Tracks: A Thirty-Year Journey with the SanTraces and Tracks: A thirty year journey with the San
by Paul Weinberg
 
 
 
 
 
 
FICTION

Selling Lip ServiceSelling Lip Service
by Tammy Baikie
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hlomu The Wife
Zandile The Resolute
Naledi His Love

by Dudu Busani-Dube
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dancing the Death DrillDancing the Death Drill
by Fred Khumalo
 
 
 
 
 
 
Emperor Shaka the GreatEmperor Shaka The Great (English Edition)
Unodumehlezi Kamenzi (isiZulu Edition)
by Masizi Kunene
 
 
 
 
 
 
Being KariBeing Kari
by Qarnita Loxton
 
 
 
 
 
 
Recognition
Recognition: An Anthology of South African Short Stories

edited by David Medalie
 
 
 
 
 
 
Web
Web

by Naomi Meyer
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Last StopThe Last Stop
by Thabiso Mofokeng
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Third Reel
The Third Reel

Die Derde Spoel
by S J Naudé
 
 
 
 
 
 
If I Stay Right Here
If I Stay Right Here
by Chwayita Ngamlana
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ayixoxeki NakuxoxekaAyixoxeki Nakuxoxeka
by Mbongeni Cyprian Nzimande
 
 
 
 
 
 
Akulahlwa Mbeleko NgakufelwaAkulahlwa Mbeleko Ngakufelwa
by Zukiswa Pakama
 
 
 
 
 
 
Delilah Now TrendingDelilah Now Trending
by Pamela Power
 
 
 
 
 
 
Die BergengelDie Bergengel
by Carina Stander
 
 
 
 
 
 
As in die Mond
As in die mond

by Nicole Jaekel Strauss
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Inside-Out Man
The Inside-Out Man

by Fred Strydom
 
 
 
 
 
 
Alles het niet kom wod

Alles het niet kom wôd

by Nathan Trantraal
 
 
 
 
 
 
BIOGRAPHIES

Last Night at the BasslineLast Night at the Bassline
by David Coplan and Oscar Gutierrez
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equal, but Different
Equal But Different
by Judy Dlamini
 
 
 
 
 
 
No Longer Whispering to Power
No Longer Whispering to Power: The Story of Thuli Madonsela
by Thandeka Gqubule
 
 
 
 
 
 
Being Chris Hani's Daughter Being Chris Hani’s Daughter
by Lindiwe Hani
 
 
 
 
 
 
God praat Afrikaans
God praat Afrikaans

by HemelBesem
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lied vir SarahSong for Sarah: Lessons from my Mother
Lied vir Sarah: Lesse van My Moeder

by Jonathan Jansen
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fatima MeerFatima Meer: Memories of Love & Struggle
by Fatima Meer
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Man Who Founded the ANCThe Man Who Founded The ANC: A Biography of Pixley ka Isaka Seme
by Bongani Ngqulunga
 
 
 
 
 
 
Billionaires Under Construction

Billionaires Under Construction

by DJ Sbu
 
 
 
 
 
 
CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS
 

The Elders at the DoorThe Elders at the Door (Afrikaans, English, isiZhosa, isiZulu)
by Maryanne Bester, illustrated by Shayla Bester
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Hair FairThe Hair Fair
by Carol-Ann Davids
 
 
 
 
 
 
#LoveReading
#LoveReading: short stories, poems, blogs and more
compiled by Rosamund Haden & Dorothy Dyer
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beyond the River
Beyond the River

by Mohale Mashigo
 
 
 
 
 
 
How Many Ways Can You Say Hello? How Many Ways Can You Say Hello
by Refiloe Moahloli, illustrated by Anja Stoeckigt
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dromers
Dromers

by Fanie Viljoen
 
 
 
 
 
 

COOKERY

 

HomegrownHomegrown
by Bertus Basson
 
 
 
 
 
 
Legacy of Living and Sparkles of TasteLegacy of Living & Sparkles of Taste
by Khanyisa Malabi
 
 
 
 
 
 
Johanne 14
Johanne 14: Real South African Food

by Hope Malau
 
 
 
 
 

Book details

  • Making Africa Work: A Handbook for Economic Success by Greg Mills, Jeffrey Herbst, Olusegun Obasanjo, Dickie Davis
    EAN: 9780624080275
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

» read article

uHlanga open to unsolicited submissions of poetry manuscripts in February 2017

uHlanga New Poets Series Launches with Collections by Genna Gardini and Thabo Jijana
nullnullnullnull

 
Calling all poets!

For the first time, uHlanga will be open for submissions of unsolicited manuscripts of poetry for the month of February 2017.

The press will be accepting submissions of any book length in English, isiZulu, isiXhosa, Afrikaans, or a combination of those languages. Poets must either be South African or permanent residents of South Africa.

uHlanga are the publishers of Nick Mulgrew, Genna Gardini, Thabo Jijana, Helen Moffett, Stephen Symons and Rosa Lyster.

Jijana won the 2016 Ingrid Jonker Prize for his collection, Failing Maths and My Other Crimes.

Read: uHlanga Press Poetry Special, Featuring Thabo Jijana, Genna Gardini and Nick Mulgrew

* * * * *

Read the submission guidelines:

uHlanga does not accept unsolicited poems or manuscripts for publication outside of our announced reading periods.

Our first open submissions period for original chapbooks and collections of poetry from South African poets, or poets living in South Africa, will take place from 1 February to 28 February 2017. Manuscripts must be predominantly written in English, Zulu, Xhosa, Afrikaans, or a combination of those languages. Every manuscript will be read, and all will be considered for publication.

There is no indicated length for manuscripts, although most books published by uHlanga contain 20-40 poems. (Manuscripts envisioned as chapbooks, for example, may be shorter, while epic poetry may contain very few poems.) The more coherent, structured and economical your manuscript is, the higher the chance of it being published – so do not simply include every poem you have ever written. Successful manuscripts will be published in the manner and format – eg full collection, chapbook – that uHlanga deems most appropriate for the content.

Please note that anthologies or retrospective collections will not be accepted. Manuscripts containing poems previously published in magazines, anthologies, journals, or online will be accepted, as long as each previously-published poem is acknowledged in the manuscript, and as long as the writer has the rights to reprint such poems. Manuscripts that have already been published previously as a whole will not be accepted.

We accept manuscripts from writers of any experience, whether they have published a collection of poetry before or not. The only criterium for eligibility is that writers either be South African, or a permanent resident of South Africa.

Only writers of successful submissions will be replied to, and will be offered our standard contract. Please note that this is not a competition: we reserve the right to publish none of the manuscripts received during this submissions period.

Submissions will only be accepted through our email address, submissions@uhlangapress.co.za, as either .doc or .pdf attachments, with all text in Times New Roman. Include your name and contact information on a cover letter attached alongside the manuscript. Being familiar with our books is essential: feel free to mention to us why you think your manuscript will be a good fit for uHlanga.

There is no reading fee. Agented submissions are discouraged, but not strictly disallowed.

Do not submit your manuscript before 1 February 2017 or after 28 February 2017 – it will be discarded without being read. Good luck!
Where can I publish poetry outside of reading periods?

Your best way to get noticed by us is to be an active poet, publishing as many poems in as many places as you can. There are a number of excellent periodicals and websites in South(ern) Africa that accept unsolicited poems for publication. Here are the periodicals that uHlanga reads most often:

Prufrock
Aerodrome
New Contrast
Stanzas
New Coin
The Kalahari Review

You likely won’t publish any poems, however, if you don’t read poems! Support local literary magazines.

Ends

 
Related stories:


» read article

New Ngugi wa Thiong’o story translated into over 30 African languages in record-breaking issue of Jalada Africa

Ngugi wa Thiong'o
In the House of the InterpreterA Grain of WheatThe River BetweenWeep Not, ChildPetals of BloodDreams in a Time of WarWizard of the Crow

 
The latest edition of Jalada Africa contains a new short story by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o translated into over 30 African languages, making it the “single most translated short story in the history of African writing”.

The short story was originally written in Kikuyu as “Ituĩka Rĩa Mũrũngarũ: Kana Kĩrĩa Gĩtũmaga Andũ Mathiĩ Marũngiĩ”, and was translated by Ngũgĩ himself into English as “The Upright Revolution: Or Why Humans Walk Upright”.

This is an impressive first foray into translation for Jalada Africa, a Pan-African writers’ collective based in Nairobi, Kenya. Translation Issue: Volume 1 is the culmination of a four-month project, and features collaborative work by professional and amateur translators as well as language enthusiasts from 14 African countries.

In his introduction to the issue, Jalada Africa managing editor Moses Kilolo says: “Professor Wa Thiong’o is uniquely placed to be the first distinguished author and intellectual featured in our periodical translations issue. He has, for many years, been the most vocal proponent in publishing in African languages.”

nullThe story is available in Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiZulu and Xitsonga, as well as the original Kikuyu, Ahmharic, Dholuo, Kikamba, Lwisukha-Lwidakho, Ikinyarwada, Arabic, Luganda, Kiswahili, Hausa, Meru, Lingala, Igbo, Ibibio, Somali, Nandi, Rukiga, Bamanankan, Lugbarati, Shona, Lubukusu, Kimaragoli, Giriama, Sheng, Ewe, Naija Languej, Marakwet and French.

Audio recordings of the story are also available in Kikuyu, English and Sheng. The anthology will soon be available in PDF and ebook formats.

  • Jalada Africa encourages writers and translators who do not find their African languages featured in this issue and who would like to volunteer to contribute a translation of this story and to future Translation Issues to get in touch with at jaladatranslations@gmail.com.
nullnullnull

 

The aim of the project was to renew interest in publishing in local languages and increase access to such stories.

Ngũgĩ says: “The cruel genius of colonialism was to turn normality into abnormality and then make the colonised accept the abnormality as the real norm … mother tongue first; then add to it, as necessary, that’s the way of progress and empowerment.

“So [Jalada's] actions will empower Africa by making Africans own their resources from languages – making dreams with our languages – to other natural resources – making things with them, consuming some, exchanging some.

“The moment we lost our languages was also the moment we lost our bodies, our gold, diamonds, copper, coffee, tea. The moment we accepted (or being made to accept) that we could not do things with our languages was the moment we accepted that we could not make things with our vast resources.”

Read a short excerpt from the English version:

A long time ago humans used to walk on legs and arms, just like all the other four limbed creatures. Humans were faster than hare, leopard or rhino. Legs and arms were closer than any other organs: they had similar corresponding joints: shoulders and hips; elbows and knees; ankles and wrists; feet and hands, each ending with five toes and fingers, with nails on each toe and finger. Hands and feet had similar arrangements of their five toes and finger from the big toe and thumb to the smallest toes and pinkies. In those days the thumb was close to the other fingers, the same as the big toe. Legs and arms called each other first cousins.

Jalada Africa is planning more editions of translation, featuring a previously unpublished story of no more than 3,000 words. Writers and translators across the continent will be invited to submit and edit translations in their African language of knowledge and/or study. The ultimate goal is to have each story translated into 2,000 African languages.

Jalada’s September 2015 anthology, The Language Issue, also celebrates Africa’s diversity in language, with fiction, poetry, spoken word, visual art and essays in 23 African languages as well as English, French, Polish and Mandarin.

“Despite long-running conversations on the need for publishing in indigenous languages on the African continent over the past five decades, writing and translations remain minimal and the little that exists continues to rapidly decline,” the publication says. “Since our Languages Issue, we’ve deliberated on the best ways of making writing in our languages a continuous activity.

“We were convinced the previous anthology did not capture all the facets of languages we were interested in. There are millions of speakers in African languages and not many writers in African languages. Why? Can this be changed?”

 
Related stories:

Image courtesy of What’s Good Africa

Book details


» read article

Etisalat Prize to donate 1,000 books to eThekwini libraries for Time of the Writer

Time of the Writer

 
The Etisalat Prize for Literature will be donating 1,000 books to an eThekwini Municipality library, in support of the Time of the Writer Festival.

The 19th Time of the Writer, presented by the Centre for Creative Arts (UKZN), begins on Monday, 14 March, and runs until Saturday, 19 March.

The Etisalat Prize, which is in its third year, is the first ever pan-African prize celebrating debut writers of published novels.

All three authors shortlisted for the prize this year – Congolese writer Fiston Mwanza Mujila and South Africans Penny Busetto and Rehana Rossouw – will be in attendance at the festival.

Getting DirtySweet MedicineChatsworthCall it a Difficult NightA Memory This Size and Other StoriesRun Racist RunAffluenza
Imfihlo NgujuquTaty Went WestPiggy Boy's BluesUnimportanceRumoursChasing The Tails of My Father’s CattleTram 83
The Story of Anna P, as Told by HerselfWhat Will People SayLondon – Cape Town – JoburgAfrican DelightsSongs and Stories of Africa

 
Related stories:


 
See some of Books LIVE’s coverage of last year’s event:

 
Book details


» read article

eThekwini libraries buy 2 copies of every book by all Time of the Writer featured authors

Getting DirtySweet MedicineChatsworthCall it a Difficult NightA Memory This Size and Other StoriesRun Racist RunAffluenza
Imfihlo NgujuquTaty Went WestPiggy Boy's BluesUnimportanceRumoursChasing The Tails of My Father’s CattleTram 83
The Story of Anna P, as Told by HerselfWhat Will People SayLondon – Cape Town – JoburgAfrican DelightsSongs and Stories of Africa

 
The eThekwini Municipality Libraries Department will purchase two copies of each book by every writer featured at the Time of the Writer Festival this year.

The 19th Time of the Writer kicks off in Durban on Monday, 14 March, presented by the Centre for Creative Arts (UKZN).

The authors’ books will be distributed to 92 municipal libraries around eThekwini and featured prominently in Time of the Writer displays, to encourage the community to visit the festival.

The eThekwini Municipality Libraries Department will also host a series of events entitled Conversations that Matter, which will take place in public libraries around the city.

The CCA has already announced a change in venues and a special programme for the Time of the Writer festival this year, under the theme Decolonising the Book. Instead of the Elizabeth Sneddon Theatre at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, evening panel session this year will each take place in a different location across the surrounding areas of Durban, in Clermont, Cato Manor, Umlazi, Inanda and KwaMashu.

A park and ride shuttle service will transport visitors to the various venues. The shuttle will pick up passengers from Durban Centrum Park, where there is secure parking, from Tuesday through to Saturday at both 10 AM and 5:30 PM every day.

 

Time of the Writer

 
Related stories:


 
See some of Books LIVE’s coverage of last year’s event:

 
Book details


» read article

Decolonising the Book – 2016 Time of the Writer programme revealed

 

Alert! The programme for the 2016 Time of the Writer Festival has been released.

The 19th Time of the Writer will take place from 14 – 19 March in Durban. This year’s theme is Decolonising the Book.

This year participants include Christa Biyela, Panashe Chigumadzi, Ashwin Desai, Mishka Hoosen, Davina Kawuma, Eusebius McKaiser, Niq Mhlongo, Mandla Ndlovu, Nikhil Singh and Nakhane Touré – who will all be introduced at the opening ceremony.

The keynote address will be delivered by Thando Mgqolozana, while Mongane Wally Serote and Sindiwe Magona will make a Living Legends Address.

In addition, the three writers shortlisted for this year’s Etisalat Prize for Literature – Fiston Mwanza Mujila, Penny Busetto and Rehana Rossouw – will be in attendance.

Other writers at the festival will be Zukiswa Wanner, Siphiwo Mahala, Gcina Mhlophe, and many many more.

Scroll down for the full programme

Getting DirtySweet MedicineChatsworthCall it a Difficult NightA Memory This Size and Other Stories
Run Racist RunAffluenzaImfihlo NgujuquTaty Went WestPiggy Boy's Blues
UnimportanceRumoursChasing The Tails of My Father’s CattleTram 83The Story of Anna P, as Told by HerselfWhat Will People Say
London – Cape Town – JoburgAfrican DelightsSongs and Stories of Africa

 
 

2016 Time of the Writer programme


 

 
Related stories:

See some of Books LIVE’s coverage of last year’s event:

 

 
Book details


» read article

Download a free children’s story – available in 11 official languages – and pass on the power of stories this World Read Aloud Day

 
National reading-for-enjoyment campaign Nal’ibali has teamed up with Yvonne Chaka Chaka for World Read Aloud Day on 24 February, 2016.

Last year, with the support of hundreds of South Africans, Nal’ibali read aloud to over 166 000 children and it hopes to double or even triple that number this year.

Yvonne Chaka Chaka will be giving her own special reading of Neo and the Big Wide World in isiZulu to children at Orlando Stadium in Soweto.

In addition, Orlando Pirates Football Club will launch its Reading Stars Programme.

Scroll down to find out more and download the book.

 

“If we want our children to grow up as strong and powerful readers, we must demonstrate reading for them,” Nal’ibali managing director Jade Jacobsohn says. “When you read aloud to a child, you show them what reading looks like and how to make sense of text. Exposing them to new words and expressions used in stories helps to develop their vocabularies and provides a rich pool of language for children to draw from when they want to read and write on their own.”

Carole Bloch, executive director of PRAESA (the Project for the Study of Alternative Education), a co-founder of Nal’ibali, adds: “The power of reading aloud to children is incredible. Not only is it richly rewarding and enjoyable for any age, it is also the way we establish the foundational, knowledge and motivation young children need as they are learning to read – and indeed for all learning.

 

“There are over 17 000 000 children in South Africa with only around 5 percent being read to by their caregivers. World Read Aloud Day celebrates the joy of sharing a good story and we hope that even more adults in South Africa will join us this year. Then let’s grow that 5 percent to 50 percent by continuing to explore books and stories throughout the year.”

How to get involved

This year’s special story, Neo and the Big Wide World, by Vianne Venter and illustrated by Rico of Madam and Eve Fame, is freely available for download from Nal’ibali’s web and mobisites.

Members of the public can also sign up on these sites to share how many children they will be reading to, and stand the chance to win one of four Bargain Books hampers worth R1 000 each!

 

Neo and the Big Wide World is available in all 11 official languages, and a further two: it will be available in Braille in the February edition of Blind SA’s youth magazine, while Sign Language Education and Development (SLED) has collaborated with Story Bosso runners up Kerrin Kokot and Jayne Batzofin to produce a signed video of the story which can be viewed on the Nal’ibali website.

The story will also appear in a commemorative edition of the Nal’ibali’s supplement produced in partnership with PRAESA and media partner Times Media.

 

You can access the World Read Aloud Day story online here:

And for a burst of storytelling inspiration, listen to Yvonne Chaka Chaka reading the story in English and isiZulu!


» read article

Nal’ibali calls for more books in local languages for International Mother Language Day

 
Knowledge is power. Where do we keep knowledge? Books! So lots of books means … lots of power!

This is the central message of an inspiring new video produced by Nal’ibali, the national reading-for-enjoyment campaign, with which they are launching their call for more books in South African languages.

The call is made as part of the Nal’ibali celebration of International Mother Language Day, happening on 21 February. This year’s theme, as selected by the UN, will be “Quality education, language(s) of instruction and learning outcomes”.

All children deserve to learn to read, and to be read to in the language that they are most familiar with and comfortable in. In this way their experiences of books and stories become far richer through greater comprehension of the tales within. This is a crucial component in building children’s motivation to read, a desire which we know has significant implications for their future learning success. – Jade Jacobsohn, Managing Director of the Nal’ibali campaign.

A look at the Children’s Book Availability Report by The South African Publications Network (SAPnet) reveals that very few children are able to read books in their mother tongues owing to a lack of such books:

Between 2000 and 2015, 53 599 children’s books were published in South Africa. Of these 21 714 were English (40%), 12 934 were Afrikaans (24%), 3 638 isiXhosa (6%), 3561 isiZulu (6%), 2 341 Setswana (4%), 2 273 Sepedi (4%), 2 200 Sesotho (4%), 1 309 Xitsonga (2%); 1 144 Tshivenda (2%), 1 119 Siswati (2%) and 912 isiNdebele (1%). This does not take into account the number of these books that are school textbooks. The remaining books published were dictionaries.

 

Watch the video and be inspired to heed to Nal’ibali’s call for an increase in the production and distribution of books in indigenous languages:

YouTube Preview Image

 
Related story:

 

Press release

Nal’ibali launches powerful PSA this International Mother Languages Day

Highlighting the critical lack of books available in all African languages to children in South Africa, Nal’ibali, the national reading-for-enjoyment campaign, has produced a powerful public service announcement that illustrates the breakdown of books available per language and calls for support for African language reading materials for children. The video has been developed in recognition of International Mother Languages Day on Sunday, 21 February.

“All children deserve to learn to read, and to be read to in the language that they are most familiar with and comfortable in. In this way their experiences of books and stories become far richer through greater comprehension of the tales within. This is a crucial component in building children’s motivation to read, a desire which we know has significant implications for their future learning success,” explains Jade Jacobsohn, Managing Director of the Nal’ibali campaign.

“Without this, many African language speaking children are likely to continue to find learning to read and write a burdensome and difficult task. The accelerated growth and use of a multilingual children’s literature is a sign of appreciation of and care for the cultural and educational interests of all children. It also offers the chance to embrace diversity and grow common understandings”, adds Carole Bloch, Executive Director of PRAESA (the Project for the Study of Alternative Education in South Africa) cofounder and literacy content and quality assurance partner of Nal’ibali.

What motivates children to read? Research has shown that choice and relevance are two of the most critical components. When children can choose from a wide selection of books and stories that they understand, inspire them and are relevant to their lives, they are more likely to want to read.

However, a recent report issued by SAPnet (The South African Publications Network) shows that of the total number of books published in South Africa between the year 2000 and 2015, 40% of these were in English, 24% in Afrikaans and just 6% in isiXhosa and isiZulu. The remaining official languages were represented with percentages smaller than six. Most notably, the percentage of books for isiNdebele is just 1%*, an alarmingly small portion of books given the population breakdown per language.

It is also important to note that these figures do not take into account the number of books that are school textbooks, as this would further reduce the number of books available.

“We want our children to grow up to be strong and powerful readers, and to have the best chance of success in the classroom and in the workforce. We need to increase quantity and access to literacy materials in all languages. We need to start by promoting the importance of mother tongue languages and celebrating them,” concludes Jacobsohn.

Using languages which people understand deeply plays an important role in social and economic development. African languages must be accorded cultural capital. Nal’ibali would like to thank SAPnet and the Cape Town Central Library for their kind support in the production of the video and the Nal’ibali campaign.

For more information about the Nal’ibali campaign, to watch the video or to access children’s in a range of South African languages, visit www.nalibali.org and www.nalibali.mobi. You can also find them on Facebook and Twitter: nalibaliSA.

Ends


» read article

Call for English or isiZulu submissions for the 2016 Time of the Writer Schools Short Story Competition

null

 

The Time of the Writer Festival, hosted annually by the Centre for Creative Arts at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, is inviting high school learners to submit their short stories for the annual Schools Short Story Competition.

The closing date for submissions is Friday, 26 February, 2016.

Stories can be written in English or isiZulu.

The 19th Time of the Writer Festival will take place from 14 – 19 March this year in Durban.

See some of Books LIVE’s coverage of last year’s event:

 

 

Press release

Schools Short Story Competition

Held in conjunction with the Time of the Writer festival, the Schools Short Story Competition is open to all South African high school learners and aims to encourage creative expression in young people while functioning as a springboard for the future writers of South Africa. With the festival’s long standing commitment toward nurturing a culture of reading and writing, this competition has received a wide appeal that continues to grow with each edition of the festival.

Winners will be awarded cash prizes, book vouchers and complimentary tickets to the festival.

The Time of the Writer takes place from 14-19 March 2016. As one of the country’s longest running literature festivals, Time of the Writer brings together some of the best authors, publishers, and editors from around the world, while focusing on providing a platform to KwaZulu-Natal talent. In addition to the nightly showcases at the various community based venues, the festival also organises a broad range of free daily activities including an educational and entertaining programme of workshops, reading sessions and panel discussions. This includes engagement with teachers, on the implementation of literature in the classroom and with members of the public interested in literature as well as visits to schools by the festival participants.

For more information on the festival or the competition, go to http://www.cca.ukzn.ac.za/ or contact the Centre for Creative Arts on 031 260 2506/1816 or email: schools@cca-ukzn.co.za

Terms and Conditions

  • The competition is open to all South African high school students.
  • There is no particular topic for the short stories.
  • The short stories can be written in English or isiZulu.
  • Illegible entries will not be considered (typed entries preferred).
  • Short stories are to be a maximum of 5 pages in length.
  • Deadline for submissions is 26 February 2016. (16:00)

How to Enter
Entries can be submitted by one of the following methods:

Email: schools@cca-ukzn.co.za
Fax: 031 260 3074
Hand delivery: Centre for Creative Arts, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Mazisi Kunene Avenue, Durban, 4041, South Africa

All entries must include:

  • Name of School (Contact and physical address)
  • Name of submitter (Grade, age and contact details)
  • Ensure that all pages are numbered

Organised by the Centre for Creative Arts(University KwaZulu-Natal), the 19th Time of the Writer is supported by the City of Durban, the French Institute of South Africa and Alliance Française, the KZN Department of Arts and Culture and the National Department of Arts and Culture and the Goethe-Institut. The Centre for Creative Arts is housed in the College of Humanities at the University of KwaZulu-Natal and is a special project of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Professor Cheryl Potgieter.

Ends


» read article

All Things Wild and Wonderful – New Books to Take Along on Your Epic Holiday Get Away

Stress, smog and soul-destroying traffic – all the things we get to escape come year-end. Whether you’ll be getting away to the bush, the beach or some other wild beyond, there is a book for you.

Here is a list of some of the fine South African books devoted to enjoying wild and wonderful things. Birding, star-gazing, spotting animals are covered, and so is enjoying beautiful landscapes and local flora. Burchell and travel pioneer Geoffrey Kent will provide inspiration for the travel-timid.

So, which epic holiday get away will it be for you?
 
Sasol 300 Easy-to-see BirdsSasol 300 maklik sigbare voëls van Suider-AfrikaNew Guide for Beginner Birders: Sasol 300 Easy-to-see Birds by Chevonne Reynolds and Nicholas Tye

This practical, straightforward guide to some of the most commonly seen birds in southern Africa is aimed at beginner birders, or even juniors. Less daunting than a full-blown field guide, it’s handy and accessible, combining simple text with clear artwork and photographs to introduce 300 of the region’s easy-to-see birds.

 
100 Common Bird Calls in East AfricaNew: 100 Common Bird Calls in East Africa by Dave Richards and Brian Finch, with Accompanying CD

Recognise birds by their calls with this handy package of CD and accompanying book. These will help identify the sounds made by a range of the most common and widely distributed East African bird species.

This is the perfect starting point for those who wish to develop their knowledge of bird calls.

 
Sky Guide Africa South 2016New from the Astronomical Society of Southern Africa: Sky Guide Africa South 2016

This annual publication is an invaluable resource for anyone who has even a passing interest in the night skies of southern Africa and is “… an absolute must for first-time star-gazers and professional astronomers alike”.
 
 
 
 
Freshwater LifeCharles Griffiths, Jenny Day and Mike Picker Present Freshwater Life – The First Field Guide of its Kind

Freshwater Life – the first illustrated field guide of its kind for the wider southern African region – describes a vast range of plant and animal groups in a single volume. A ground-breaking concept that encompasses diverse groups from the large and conspicuous vertebrates to the diverse microscopic taxa, the book facilitates identification and describes the ecology of more than 1 000 freshwater organisms.

 
101 Kruger TalesPresenting Jeff Gordon’s 101 Kruger Tales: Extraordinary Stories from Ordinary Visitors to the Kruger National Park

101 Kruger Tales contains first-hand accounts of sightings, scrapes and encounters in one of Africa’s greatest National Parks. It details hair-raising experiences from the Kruger Park’s roads, camps, picnic sites and walking trails.

Wherever you are, this book will transport you directly into the bush. It’s a book to keep by your bedside in Kruger, to dip into at home when you’re missing the bush, to lend to friends who’ve never visited Kruger, or to pore over before your next trip.

 
50 Must-see Geological Sites in South AfricaEnjoy Our Rich Geological Heritage with 50 Must-see Geological Sites in South Africa by Gavin Whitfield

South Africa has just about the richest geological heritage on the planet. By showcasing 50 must-see sites, this guide describes why, where and how to enjoy it.

The book presents 50 of the most recognisable and geologically interesting sites around South Africa, including some of palaeontological or historical renown and some of mining interest.

 
Grasses & Grazers of Botswana and the surrounding savannaPresenting Grasses & Grazers of Botswana and the Surrounding Savanna by Veronica Roodt

An accessible reference to the grasses and grazers of this region, Veronica Roodt’s book details the fascinating ways in which these plants and animals have evolved together.

Nature lovers, farmers, students and tourists who seek an in-depth look at the interactions between grasses and the grazers that depend on them for life need look no further than this invaluable guide.

 
The Impossible Five“Warm, Fluffy and Sexy”: Justin Fox Tells John Maytham about Searching for The Impossible Five

The well-known travel writer, novelist and photographer, Justin Fox, launched his latest book, The Impossible Five: One Man’s Search for South Africa’s Most Elusive Animals early in July at The Book Lounge.

Publishing manager, Marga Stoffer, reflected on how many visitors to the Kruger Park know about “the big five” and evaluate the success of a trip on how many of these creatures were spotted. Fox, who has gone on these kinds of trips with his parents since he was a child, wanted to go a step further and seek out animals that even the game rangers seldom get to see.

 
Pocket Guide: Wild Flowers of South AfricaDiscover Our Country’s Floral Splendour with Pocket Guide: Wild Flowers of South Africa by Braam van Wyk

Wild Flowers of South Africa covers some 260 flowers representing all of the region’s major vegetation types.

This book showcases some of the region’s diverse, strikingly beautiful floral splendours.
 
 
My first book of Southern African FrogsPresenting My First Book of Southern African Frogs by Jeanne Tarrant and Sally MacLarty (Includes CD)

Frogs are appealing and colourful creatures. Children may be familiar with stages of the frog’s curious life cycle, and see their eggs or tadpoles in local streams; and everyone has heard their calls. My First Book of Southern African Frogs introduces 55 different types of frog and includes a CD of their calls. A short introduction outlines key features and includes an illustration detailing their life cycle.

 
Zulu Plant NamesWhat’s in a Name? Adrian Koopman Explores Language, Culture and Plant Life in Zulu Plant Names

In this book Adrian Koopman details the complex relationship between plants, the Zulu language and Zulu culture.

Zulu Plant Names do not just identify plants, they tell us a lot more about the plant, or how it is perceived or used in Zulu culture.

 
Burchell's TravelsBurchell’s Travels by Susan Buchanan; Illustrated with over 100 Sketches and Paintings

Burchell’s Travels tells the story of Burchell’s journeys, bringing to life an important figure who has faded into historical obscurity. It is a fascinating account of what travel was like 200 years ago – reconstructed from the rich source of Burchell’s own writings.

Beautifully illustrated with over 100 of Burchell’s sketches and paintings, this is a perfect book for anyone interested in history, art, nature and travel.

 
SafariPresenting Safari: A Memoir of a Worldwide Travel Pioneer by Geoffrey Kent

Geoffrey Kent shares his secrets as an entrepreneur always on the edge of the travel industry and will detail the most unforgettable, daredevil and entertaining moments of his 50-year career with each chapter in the book focusing on a different trip and country. He will also present an inspiring bucket list of adventures for every class of traveler, as well as reveal inside tales from tours with his most famous clients.
 

Mooiloop!Presenting Mooiloop! The Book – The People, the Places and the Recipes as Seen on TV

The essence of the award-winning programme Mooiloop! (as seen on SABC 2) is captured in this book, which invites you to take South Africa’s provincial/regional routes and experience small-town South Africa.

Stop and get out … admire some of the breathtaking, picturesque settings, take a walk down the streets and explore the shops and places of interest

 
Wildlife Southern Africa National Parks and ReservesWatch an Elephant Tackling a Buffalo in the Kruger Park, and Find Your Own Incredible Sightings (Video)

Wildlife Southern Africa National Parks & Reserves covers all the major national parks and reserves in South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Lesotho.

The guide includes an overview of Southern Africa with coverage of country facts, peace parks, malaria areas, time zones, cities and towns. This handy specialty atlas provide information boxes covering park size, fauna and flora, nearest town and airport location, contact details, camp facilities, accommodation and seasonal information
 

Book details


» read article