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Archive for the ‘Non-fiction’ Category

“I was surprised by how emotionally exhilarating looking at the past can be,” writes Vusi Thembekwayo of his biography-cum-business manual

Published in the Sunday Times

Vusi Thembekwayo, author of Vusi – Business & Life Lessons From a Black Dragon.
Pic: supplied.

 
There are few endeavours as daunting as writing a book; the idea that you are penning your thoughts, experiences and views for the world to critique and consume.

When the publisher first approached me to do a book on “the life and lessons of Vusi” project, I resisted the idea.

In fact, I rejected it outright, partly because of the idea that my life is just my collective set of experiences but also because I look at my life as a story in the making.

It is “being” every day. Writing about “the life of” seemed very final. But I love the idea that I get to share thoughts that stretch my perspective to colour the lenses of others.

I was inspired by the opportunity to inspire others. There can be no greater gift than the opportunity to inspire others into seeing themselves differently.

I was surprised by how emotionally exhilarating looking at the past can be. Remembering who you once were, parts of yourself that you’d forgotten, lost or minimised in the quest to grow into the person you are today.

As a group, entrepreneurs are notoriously bad at writing long books. We live in a world of instant action, ideation, collaboration and creation. Sprints, not long-winded marathons.

Every day we test, try, fail, and learn only to do it all over again, just a little smarter. Sitting down for an extended period to write or think through your thoughts is not only daunting, it is frankly foreign to our natural disposition.

Conquering this was a test of fortitude and discipline.

The book took two years and almost 100 three-hour sessions with my co-conspirator, Gus Silber, to complete. Every session we had the same set of emotions; deep introspection and reflection, anger at the state of affairs, and sometimes (admittedly seldom) an excited burst of excitement when I came upon a realisation.

I keep several pitbulls and leaving Gus on my outside patio unattended to refill our juice glasses was amusing. He would sit perfectly poised and still until I came back.

Eventually we decided that meeting at my clubhouse was a better bet. Indeed it was. From there we could enjoy the sights of the mountains pointed at Rustenburg. A wondrous and relaxing sight. Perfectly inspiring.

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“I decided to give my stories a bigger meaning than just LOLs and likes” – Melusi Tshabalala on writing Melusi’s Everyday Zulu

Nal’ibali column 21: term 3 (2018)

By Carla Lever

Melusi Tshabalala, author of Melusi’s Everyday Zulu. Photo provided.

 

What inspired you to write Melusi’s Everyday Zulu?

I’ve worked in advertising for the past 20 years and it broke my heart how the industry treats indigenous, (South) African languages with disrespect. I wanted to showcase the beauty and, because I am um’Zulu, I did it with isiZulu.

You have a background in advertising. How are different languages used in this industry? What do you think needs to change?

You can’t talk about how advertising uses languages without bringing marketing into it. African languages and the people who speak them are not given much respect. This is starkly evident in radio advertising, where the quality of African-language radio ads is often not the same as the English and Afrikaans because they are not given the same quality control. We need more marketers and advertising professionals who actually care to deliver a quality product to this majority audience.

Your book concept started with a Facebook page! Tell us about discovering the power of social media as a tool for activism.

A little while ago, I realised that people on Facebook enjoy my writing, so I decided to give my stories a bigger meaning than just LOLs and likes. We all have the responsibility to help build the country, using whatever skills we have. Mine is writing.

How did the momentum shift your idea from a social media platform to regular media, like your book deal and a radio slot?

I was approached by publishers and radio producers – I honestly didn’t see that coming. I now have features on Kaya FM and East Coast Radio, as well as a column in Finweek.

What was the public feedback to your Facebook posts?

The feedback has been very positive even though we’ve had some very tough conversations. The people on the page don’t always agree with me or each other, but we learn from each other. Well, most of us!

Has there been a learning curve in writing for such a huge public audience?

Yes, I’ve had to adjust to writing for a broader audience, with people from different walks of life. I’ve also learnt not to react to everything people say to me. I sometimes still react, though.

You literally tackle one of SA’s big problems one word at a time. Do you think we can chip away at our ingrained prejudices?

I’ve realised that we can! We just need to talk to each other. We exist in silos and make assumptions about “the other”. That said, some people really are just terrible.

I love your catchphrase – “There’s Um’Zulu in all of us!” What do you think SA would be like if we all made an effort to learn and use each others’ languages?

I believe we all have little bits of each other in us. We need to tap into them and become an unstoppable force in the world. That’s our nation’s uniqueness.

Children’s brains are incredibly good at picking up language – they learn through play and aren’t afraid to get words wrong. How can we keep this sense of play and fun in learning language as adults?

We need to interact with each other, make friends who are different from us. We need to laugh together and at ourselves, while always being aware of our colonial and apartheid history.

***

Melusi’s Everyday Zulu is published by Jonathan Ball and their giving away THREE copies! To enter, simply tell us what Melusi’s catchphrase is. Email your answer to Tiso Blackstar’s education consultant, Patti McDonald: Patti.McDonald@tisoblackstar.co.za before Monday, 27 August.

Reading and telling stories with your children is a powerful gift to them. It builds knowledge, language, imagination and school success! For more information about the Nal’ibali campaign, or to access children’s stories in a range of South African languages, visit: www.nalibali.org.

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Book Bites: 12 August

Published in the Sunday Times

Mr Peacock’s Possessions
****
Lydia Syson, Zaffre, R265

The idea of living on a small, fertile island has engaged the public imagination for centuries, but in this literary novel Syson tweaks the tropical island trope to present us with a somewhat bleaker take of the real dangers a community might face when isolated from society. In 1879 the Peacocks were entrepreneurial gypsies, moving from one Antipodean location to another with an ever-growing family, driven by the ambition and the discontent of the family patriarch, Joseph. The Peacocks and their young children settle on one island but discover they cannot work the island alone, and send for workers who are shocked to discover the Peacock offspring lack even the basics of literacy. Narrated from the points of view of Lizzie, Joseph’s favourite child, and Kalala, the worker who teaches the Peacock children to read and write, it examines how the threat to a family and community often comes not from foreign elements, but the worm within the bud. Aubrey Paton

The Tattoo Thief
****
Alison Belsham, Orion Books, R285

Francis Sullivan has been promoted to Detective Inspector in Brighton and his first case turns out to be the work of a serial killer who is targeting people who have tattoos by well-known artists, cutting the inked flesh out while the victim is still alive. Sullivan has a lot to prove and with everyone working against him, even tattoo artist Marni Mullins, who seems to have all the answers, is not sure he’ll be able to catch the tattoo thief. This is the first in a planned series by the author and if this fast-paced thriller is anything to go by, we’re happy to accept seconds. Jessica Levitt @jesslevitt

The Language of Kindness: A Nurse’s Story
****
Christie Watson, Chatto & Windus, R320

Christie Watson spent 20 years as a nurse in the UK’s national health service. Her memoir walks readers through the halls of hospitals, where she deals with critically ill children, mental health patients and the elderly that society forgets. It opens with a clinical tone, gradually warming, until, by the final quarter, it is nearly impossible to read without the sting of tears. A tale that will make readers champions of nurses, while wondering why access to quality healthcare is too often reserved for the privileged. Tiah Beautement @ms_tiahmarie

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RIP V.S. Naipaul (17 August 1932 – 11 August 2018)

Via Times Select

By Andrew Donaldson

There has been a flood of tributes and career appraisals following the death at the weekend of VS Naipaul, arguably the greatest and most infuriating figure in post-colonial literature. For more than five decades he gave his readers often searing and withering portraits of societies in the developing world.

That honesty earned him severe criticism – and not just for his particular point of view on the colonialism and post-colonialism so unequivocally detailed in his novels and travel writing. He was just as brutal when it came to his own failings as a man, so much so that his violent behaviour threatened to overwhelm his literary reputation.

He spared his biographer, Patrick French, nothing – so much so that the latter’s The World Is What It Is: The Authorised Biography of VS Naipaul (Vintage, 2009) is a gobsmacking page-turner.

Naipaul was fairly open about the humiliation he caused his first wife, Patricia Hale, and the 20-year affair he conducted with Margaret Gooding, a women he regularly assaulted. When the affair began, his editor Diana Athill rebuked him for his behaviour. He told her: “I am having carnal pleasure for the first time in my life, are you saying I must give it up?”

Pleasure meant degrading Gooding in bed. As Naipaul told French: “I was very violent with her for two days with my hand; my hand began to hurt … She didn’t mind it at all. She thought of it in terms of my passion for her. Her face was bad. She couldn’t appear really in public. My hand was swollen. I was utterly helpless. I have enormous sympathy for people who do strange things out of passion.”

What to read, though, of the 29 books that Naipaul produced? His first collection of short stories, Miguel Street (1959), details the lives of ordinary Trinidadians in a run-down corner of Port of Spain. The novels A House for Mr Biswas (1961), The Mimic Men (1967) and A Bend in the River (1978) are pretty much essential. Of his non-fiction work I recommend The Loss of El Dorado (1969), his India travelogues, An Area of Darkness (1964), India: A Wounded Civilisation (1977) and India: A Million Mutinies Now (1990), Among the Believers: An Islamic Journey (1981) and Beyond Belief: Islamic Excursions Among the Converted Peoples (1998).

He was particularly scathing about South Africans in The Masque of Africa: Glimpses of African Belief (2010). An uncomfortable experience, you could say.

The World is What it Is

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The World is What it Is: The Authorized Biography of VS Naipaul by Patrick French
EAN: 9780330455985
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Miguel Street

Miguel Street by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780435989545
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A House for Mr Biswas

A House for Mr Biswas by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522892
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The Mimic Men

The Mimic Men by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522922
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A Bend in the River

A Bend in the River by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522991
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The Loss of El Dorado

The Loss of El Dorado by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522847
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An Area of Darkness

An Area of Darkness: His Discovery of India by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522830
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India: A Wounded Civilization

India: A Wounded Civilization by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522717
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India: A Million Mutinies Now

India: A Million Mutinies Now by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330519861
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Among the Believers

Among the Believers by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330522823
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Beyond Belief

Beyond Belief by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330517874
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The Masque of Africa

The Masque of Africa by VS Naipaul
EAN: 9780330472043
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In his business autobiography Nic Haralambous discusses the truth about the last 15 years of his entrepreneurial journey

Anyone can start something. Your chance of failure is almost guaranteed. Most people won’t learn. Almost no one does it again.

Are you bored and baffled by spin doctors telling you how to succeed, how to make $1 000 000 or how to build the best business in just 30 days? Everyone claims to have the next best short cut or hack to help you along the path of entrepreneurship.

It’s all bullshit.

In his business autobiography Nic Haralambous discusses the truth about the last 15 years of his entrepreneurial journey. Nic openly discusses his failures and sacrifices over the past decade and a half spent building businesses.

There is advice all over the place about the rules to follow if you want to succeed, the do’s and don’ts of running a company, the how-to of how-to do this, that or the next thing.

There are also many personalities out there telling young entrepreneurs to hustle non-stop, risk everything and never sleep if they want success. No one talks about how hard it is, how lonely it is and how difficult it is to build a business.

No one is willing to forgo their ego and be honest. If nothing else, Nic Haralambous is honest about his journey.

Nic has lived the hustle; he has pushed through physical pain, mental suffering, business failures, personal torment and relationship strife all in the name of building businesses. Nic decided to write a big book of his failures so that entrepreneurs around the world can begin to understand that it is not always glamorous, easy or fun to build a business. If entrepreneurship is calling you then you absolutely cannot miss out on the truth, behind the business, written by Nic Haralambous.

Nic Haralambous built his first website when he was 12 years old. His first real business was a band that didn’t go very far. He was 16 when he first tried and failed to sell product for money. He has spent over 15 years building businesses, failing and learning hard lessons through intense times. His crowning accomplishment is how many failures he has learned from in his career as an entrepreneur. He started out in the world of journalism, moved into technology and then onto building a global retail business online.

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Glen David Gold’s mother has overtaken the field in the Mad Maternal Stakes, writes Michele Magwood

Published in the Sunday Times

Glen David Gold became a successful writer despite his pitiable, maddening mother. Pic: supplied.
 
I Will Be Complete
****
Glen David Gold, Sceptre, R300

In the Flaky Mater Olympics – a hotly contested subsection of memoirs – Glen David Gold’s mother is the new leader. She’s overtaken Jeannette Walls’s mother in The Glass Castle, who was free-spirited to the point of criminal neglect, and has nosed past Augusten Burroughs’s mother who gave him away as a child to her psychiatrist, as he described in his memoir Running With Scissors.

Gold, best known for his bestselling novel Carter Beats the Devil, was born and raised in California as the ’60s swung into the ’70s.

The family was wealthy for a while, living in a vast ranch house in a shiny new suburb, with “a living room conversation pit with hidden television cabinet, executed by contractors who’d worked on the Haunted Mansion at Disneyland”.

His engineer father was proud of his success, showing off his smart modern art and his ethereal British wife who used to be mistaken for the actress Linda Evans.

Gold was an anxious, precocious child who his parents labelled as gifted; so serious that someone commented “that’s not a child, it’s a 36-year-old midget”.

His father’s business tanked and his parents separated when he was 10. His father quickly met and married a much younger woman and moved to Chicago to start a new family. Gold’s mother (she is never named) dreamed of being a novelist but slipped into a life of spiralling failure, starting off with a decadent conman in San Francisco then an abusive fashion designer in New York and a violent, illiterate meth addict who dragged her through various states.

Even when reduced to living in a woman’s shelter she always believed her ship was about to come in. She is a pitiable figure, but a maddening one. The faultline in Gold’s life was the day she went off to New York for a few days and left him in their apartment in San Francisco to fend for himself.

She was gone for months. He was 12 years old.

And fend for himself is what he did, making himself fit in, first at boarding school, then at college, working in a rackety bookstore to make ends meet and trying to fill in the emotional chasms that his adolescence had opened in him. How many times could he rescue his mother? How much longer could he believe she just had bad luck rather than that she was the architect of her own failure?

It would be years of rejections (from both publishers and women) before Gold achieved success with Carter Beats the Devil and he married the novelist Alice Sebold (they have since divorced). It would be years before he could revisit his fractured past with the clear eyes that he does in this superb memoir.

“I’m looking for my mother, or what remains of her,” he writes. “There is not going to be redemption here; nor am I going to indict her as a monster. There is another way to go for those of us who can no longer love our mothers.”

One needs to stay with him through his neuroses and compulsive emotional auditing which slow things down. When he finally reveals, at the end of the book, the faultlines he uncovers in his mother’s own life, it’s like a physical blow. @michelemagwood

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I Will Be Complete by Glen David Gold
EAN: 9781473620179
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Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing a tour de force of biography writing and self-discovery, writes Karina M. Szczurek

Published in the Sunday Times

Doris Lessing, née Taylor, born in 1919. Photographed here in 1958. Picture: Getty Images.

 
Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing
*****
Lara Feigel, Bloomsbury, R540 (hardcover)

“There were too many weddings that summer,” writes Lara Feigel in the opening line of her brilliant and daring Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing. At the end of the first paragraph she promises herself that she “would work out why I minded it all so much”.

The resulting quest is a tour de force of biography writing and self-discovery. Literary scholars are often drawn to topics that are of interest and consequence for their own lives. Yet, even if that spark of private recognition is openly acknowledged, it is seldom explored in the official research.

The inclusion of intimate, personal reflections by the author when writing a biography of someone else is usually frowned upon. And it can be risqué. To do so anyway is heroic.

Feigel is a Reader in Modern Literature and Culture at King’s College London. In her most recent books, The Love-charm of Bombs and The Bitter Taste of Victory, she traced the public and private lives of writers and intellectuals during and after World War 2.

Published to great critical acclaim, they established Feigel as a cultural historian and literary critic of note. Both books are focused on the intersection of life and literature in history.

Free Woman follows in their footsteps, but this time Feigel herself becomes one of the book’s subjects. While exploring Lessing’s work and dedication to, in the words of one of her famous characters, “living as fully as I can”, Feigel searches for what the “right to live fully” would entail in her own life and writing.

“It seemed that Lessing was a writer to discover in your 30s; a writer who wrote about the lives of grown-up women with an honesty and fullness I had not found in any novelist before or since.”

We are mysteries, even to ourselves, and not many have had the ability to penetrate the silences shrouding our lives. In 1931, Virginia Woolf spoke about not having solved the problem of articulating “the truth about my own experience as a body… I doubt that any woman has solved it yet.”

Feigel’s attempt to do just that is fascinating. Facing her own sense of claustrophobia, frustration and lack of fulfilment as a woman, sexual being, wife and mother, Feigel seeks to understand what it means to be a truly “free woman” – most importantly, one “who is also happy”.

The journey she embarks on and the inner truths she discovers about herself through the lens of Lessing’s striking, often contradictory, life demand a lot of courage. And reading Feigel’s account is equally empowering. Outside of her writing, Lessing is remembered for two facts: that she abandoned two of her children and that she had an awkward affair with communism. Feigel goes into the details of both these relationships.

No matter what else can be said about Lessing, there is little doubt that she was bold. She was not afraid to reach for what she felt she required to live a meaningful life as a woman and writer.

“It seems true of all enduring novelists … that they illuminate our lives, and that we live differently as a result of reading them,” Feigel states. Confronting her own body – its realities, longings and failures – as well as the relationships in her life and the need to be her own person, Feigel is just as fearless in trying to define what is crucial in making her own existence worthwhile.

Free Woman is simultaneously an incisive book of scholarship and a brave, liberating memoir. It will not only bring further, highly deserved recognition for its author, but undoubtedly inspire many readers to turn to Lessing’s work, afresh or for the first time. @KarinaMSzczurek

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Free Woman: Life, Liberation and Doris Lessing by Lara Feigel
EAN: 9781635570953
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Christopher Hope gives readers an absorbing, trenchant portrait of the nation and its people, writes Michele Magwood of The Café de Move-on Blues

Published in the Sunday Times

The Café de Move-on Blues
The Café de Move-on Blues by Christopher Hope (author pic supplied) is an elegy to a living nation.
 
The Café de Move-on Blues: In Search of the New South Africa
*****
Christopher Hope, Atlantic Books, R290

On the cover of Christopher Hope’s surpassing new book is a David Goldblatt photograph dating from 1964. The battered caravan selling food and drink is familiar to any South African, a ubiquitous feature of our urban landscape known as a “café de move-on” because the police were always moving them on. Hope takes this as both title and metaphor for a journey into the soul of South Africa now, a bookend to his acclaimed memoir from 30 years ago, White Boy Running.

It is both a physical and a philosophical journey, as he writes in the preface: “This is an account of a journey around South Africa. It is a search for understanding of who ‘we’ are and what we thought we were doing there.”

Hope takes as his atlas a trail of defaced and contested monuments, starting off with the statue of Rhodes on the UCT campus and looping up as far as Vuwani in Limpopo and back down through Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape to Cape Town and the head of Rhodes on Devil’s Peak, where he finds the nose lopped clean off.

At each stop Hope captures a leaf of history: pointing out, for instance, that the vandalised statue of Jan van Riebeeck on the Cape Town foreshore is a fake, that this man and the portrait on the banknotes was another, better-looking person than the dumpy original. “The story spun around him as the founding father of the nation … was the founding fraud at the heart of our history.” Hendrik Verwoerd, he informs us, was not an Afrikaner but Dutch, with German as his home language, and that he was schooled in Rhodesia at a very English college under the name Harold Ferwood.

He contemplates the paint-daubed statue of Gandhi, and remembers that the Indian activist may have been pro-Indian, but he was certainly not pro-black, once stating that “native prisoners are only one degree removed from the animal”. There are other less political monuments, too, such as the grave of Happy Sindane in Tweefontein, the young man who claimed he had been kidnapped from his white family and raised in a township. “What Happy did was to remind the country of how deeply, perhaps permanently, the abiding obsession with race and skin colour has damaged so many lives.”

As Hope gathers up the leaves and examines them in the light of South Africa today, an absorbing, trenchant portrait of the nation and its people emerges.

Hope’s hallmark in all his writing is his shrewd eye for the telling detail. In Fraserburg in the Karoo he points the reader to an odd kink in a street which had in the ’30s been a thriving Jewish trading area. The Afrikaner shopkeepers were jealous of their success and simply redirected traffic to their own street in what Hope calls a “municipal pogrom”. The Jews moved on.

This being Christopher Hope, the text is darted with a piquant wit. Writing about the waitress in Cape Town who was reduced to what became known as “white tears”, he dubs the restaurant “The Café Lachrymosa”.

Duane, an earnest white Wits Fallist, “had been checking his privilege so often, in his moral rear-view mirror, that he could no longer see anything ahead of him”.

Hope is uniquely placed to write about the evolution of South Africa in the last half century. With his writing repeatedly banned, he was hounded into exile in the ’70s but continued to bait the authorities from afar. He now visits the country regularly, clocking the subtle changes that we, who live here, do not see. He writes prolifically for publications such as The Guardian as well as books of fiction and non-fiction.

The Café de Move-on Blues is his apogee, an immensely wise distillation of his thinking and observations over decades and, as has been described, “an elegy to a living nation, which is still mad and absurd”.

Once, in London in the ’80s, Hope visited Oliver Tambo. They talked about the café de move-on and how sad it was, always being forced to pick up and go. Tambo told him, he said: “He wanted a country where no one was pushed out. Where no one ever felt ‘the move-on blues’.”

“Never? I asked.

“Never,” said Tambo.

Decades on, Hope finds a country as riven by race as it ever was. “Whichever way you play it, I hear the music Tambo once told me that no one in his country wanted, or needed, to hear – the café de move-on blues”. @michelemagwood

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RIP David Goldblatt (29 November 1930 – 25 June 2018)

David Goldblatt, captured by Francois Guillot / AFP.

 
Prolific South African photographer, David Goldblatt, has passed away aged 87.

Goldblatt gained recognition for his photos documenting apartheid-era South Africa, as of 1948 through to the present.

His body of work includes On the Mines (co-authored with Nadine Gordimer), Some Afrikaners Photographed (with essays by Antjie Krog and Ivor Powell), In Boksburg (with Sean O’Toole), South Africa: The Structure of Things Then, and The Transported of Kwandebele: A South African Odyssey (in collaboration with Brenda Goldblatt and Phillip van Niekerk.)

Goldblatt is survived by his wife, three children and two grandchildren.

On the Mines

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Some Afrikaners Photographed

 
 

 

In Boksburg

 
 
 

South Africa: The Structure of Things Then

 
 
 

The Transported of KwaNedebele

 
 


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2018 Sunday Times Literary Awards winners announced

Johannesburg, 24 June 2018: The winners of the prestigious Sunday Times Literary Awards were announced at a gala dinner held at The Venue, Melrose Arch, on Saturday 23 June.

Bongani Ngqulunga received the Alan Paton award for non-fiction for his book, The Man Who Founded the ANC: A Biography of Pixley ka Isaka Seme, while Harry Kalmer was named the recipient of the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize for his book, A Thousand Tales of Johannesburg. Both titles are published by Penguin Books.

The Sunday Times Literary Awards are considered the most prestigious literary accolade in South Africa.

“This year’s judging was tough but what was evident was the recognition of the art of writing. South Africa’s rich history and diverse stories are being rigorously explored, examined and celebrated,” says Jennifer Platt, Sunday Times Books Editor.

Now in its 29th year, the Alan Paton Award recognises exceptional non-fiction writing as displayed by Bongani Ngqulunga’s story The Man Who Founded the ANC: A Biography of Pixley ka Isaka Seme.

The Alan Paton judging panel consisted of Constitutional Court judge Edwin Cameron; journalist Paddi Clay; and award-winning writer, journalist and filmmaker, Sylvia Vollenhoven.

They said Ngqulunga’s book was “a revelatory, inspiring study of a man and a movement that reverberates right up to today. It is a scholarly, well-researched book that illuminates our flawed roots and our flawed nationhood, presented through the complex and mercurial character of Seme.”

The Barry Ronge Fiction Prize panel was chaired by popular radio personality, Africa Melane, alongside Love Books owner Kate Rogan and award-winning writer Ken Barris.

“Johannesburg emerges as a fascinating beast of a city, and this is a novel way of celebrating it. The outstanding writing and innovative structure – along with memorable characters – make this an instant classic,” said the fiction prize panel of Harry Kalmer’s A Thousand Tales of Johannesburg.

Kalmer is the 18th recipient of the Sunday Times fiction prize, named for Barry Ronge, arts commentator and one of the founders of the Sunday Times Literary Awards.

Recipients of the 2018 Alan Paton Award and Barry Ronge Fiction Prize each receive R100 000.

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