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Archive for the ‘Open Book Cape Town’ Category

A Q&A with author and musician, Mohale Mashigo

By Carla Lever
Via Nal’ibali: Column 24, term

Author and musician, Mohale Mashigo

 
People can tell stories in many ways. You’ve told them through writing with your novel and short stories, through images with your comic and film work and through music as the artist Black Porcelain. Why is storytelling important for you and what kind of stories do you think it’s important to tell?

Storytelling is a way for me to make sense of the world. It keeps me sane. I feel like people should tell the kinds of stories that matter to them. All stories matter!

You’ve previously said that it wasn’t until you read The Color Purple that you finally found a book with back characters. Can you tell us a little about why we owe our children and ourselves more women, more people of colour in films, books, television, advertising?

It’s so important to see yourself in the world. It’s easy to take for granted that people who look like you have always been heroes, villains, stars or models. I want little girls (like me) to know that they are worth imagining and writing stories about. It’s affirming – especially a in a world that is quite happy to make us secondary characters or people.

You first became a recognised author all the way back in school, writing fan fiction for your classmates. Do you think our communities, families and friends can play a powerful role in creating a reading culture in South Africa, by helping children to learn to love reading and writing for pleasure, not just for schoolwork?

There’s a huge storytelling culture in homes, we just need to translate that into a reading culture. Let’s take the kids to libraries, buy second hand books, give our friends books once our children have outgrown them. The quality of the stories matter as well. Let’s write stories that our kids will be excited about.

You write for the comic Kwezi, which provides South Africa with its own Jozi-based superhero. Can you tell us a little about Kwezi and where people can get their hands on copies?

Kwezi is a regular teen who suddenly discovers he has powers. Instead of becoming a “super good guy”, he uses his powers to gain popularity. It’s a story about learning how to use your powers for good. The comic books are in all book shops.

Writing for a comic seems like it would be a much more collaborative experience than writing a novel. What is the process like?

Comic books are definitely more collaborative. I’ve had to learn to be a team player and accept that stories can change at any given time. Writing a novel is lonely, but I get to be the boss!

Sure, we need South African heroes represented in books, but we also need heroes caring about books. You’ve done some heroic work to make sure that people have access to libraries. What inspires you to bring books to people?

Books changed my life and helped get through many lonely years as a weird kid. I just want kids to know that the world is bigger than their current circumstances.

How can people join in with you to help?

People can contact me on Twitter and Facebook if they have gently loved books they would like to give away. I’ll send them to a school in need of books. I also accept new books, but second-hand ones work just as well.

You’re speaking in six panel discussions at the Cape Town Open Book Festival from 5-9 September. That has to be some kind of record! What role do you think Book Festivals can and should play in South Africa right now?

Book Festivals are a place for book readers and writers to meet. Ideally we should all walk away knowing more local authors than we did before.

What kind of South African heroes would you like to see and celebrate?

I want regular people to be celebrated. There are so many regular people who do a lot to save those around them. I’d like to know their names so we can celebrate (and support) them together.

Nal’ibali’s annual multilingual storytelling competition is running this September for Literacy and Heritage Month. Aimed at reviving a love of storytelling amongst adults and children, and connecting South Africans to their rich and vibrant heritage, the theme of this year’s contest is South African Heroes. Enter by telling the story of your favourite SA icon, your personal hero, or a fictional hero in your language, and you could be crowned this year’s Story Bosso! To find out more about Nal’ibali and Story Bosso, visit www.nalibali.org, www.nalibli.mobi, or find find them on Facebook and Twitter.


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Open Book 2018 has kicked off!

Neither rain nor wind nor hail (and this is spring in Cape Town…) could keep bibliophiles away from flocking to the Mother City’s Fugard Theatre where the seventh annual Open Book Festival is currently taking place.

With a programme featuring discussions about representation of the Cape Flats, to writing characters on both sides of the law, to illustration masterclasses with internationally renonwed graphic artists, Open Book 2018 has properly haal’d uit en wys thus far!

Running until Sunday, 9 September, those of who are deskbound between 9h and 17h, still have plenty of time to attend the after-five sessions, and can look forward to an exciting weekend programme: be it politics or poetry; theories of translation or troubling stigmas; feminism or fact-checking – Open Book has it all.

Don’t believe me? Click here and let the ticket buying commence!


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The newbie’s guide to nailing Open Book 2018

By Mila de Villiers

Eight steps to make your literary journey easier:

1. Cape Town is known as ‘Slaapstad’ for a reason. Wake up at 7h15. Scroll through Insta-G. Write in your dream journal. Have coffee. Meet up for brunch. Arrive at work at 11h30. Leave at 16h. Lekker, nè? Yet for four nights and five days (5 – 9 September) Open Book’s festival programme will keep local bibliophiles busy from 10h to 21h30. What I’m trying to get at is that the days are loooong. Plan your sessions accordingly. You wouldn’t want to overexert yourself, forget to set your alarm and miss the opportunity to show off the grainy IG picture you sneakily snapped of a Man Booker Prize winning author over brunch the next morning, now would you?

2. Live tweeting is #LitFam, but pick your seat wisely if you’re going to spend the next hour or so sending 140 characters into the Twittersphere. Try to avoid the, ahem, mature members of the audience. Your screen is ‘too bright’, taking photos is ‘distracting’, your incessant typing is ‘symptomatic of the younger generation’s lack of social mores, inconsideration, ageism, avo toast-ism, craft beer-ism, nihilism’. Etc etc.

3. Cool. You’ve organised a kief spot a safe distance away from the Luddites. Next step? Memorise Twitter handles like you’re revising for your grade nine Biology: Paper 1 exam. (“The mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell!”) And double-check that the person you’re @’ing is, in fact, the legit author and not, say, a Trump-supporting troll or someone who’s been verified for having their plea to re-open the Nando’s in Stellenbosch re-tweeted 666 times.

4. If you missed the opportunity to ask an author for their signature after a session or forgot to pose for a selfie – not to worry: simply loiter in the foyer of the Fugard Theatre. Not unlike wildlife photography, you’ll have to be patient. And preferably station yourself in close proximity to the natural habitat’s most popular watering hole. (Aka the cash bar.)

5. Selflessness, thy name is Day Zero. And best you remember (and respect) this, whilst simultaneously reminding affiliates of the international literati squad that “soz, esteemed author of Nordic noir, if it’s not a number two, you unfortunately can’t flush the loo”.

6. “Sorry ma’am, we don’t serve tap water anymore … Yes ma’am, we do still serve [insert an alcoholic beverage which, if you so request, will be served on the rocks despite tap water being the PNG of the Mother City's liquid universe, here]“. Bars – of both the Kaffee and debauched variety – are abundant in Cape Town’s city bowl / the vicinity of Open Book venues. Hotfoot to Haas Coffee, Truth Coffee Roasting, Vida E, Swan Cafe or New York Bagel if you need a caffeine kick during the hour-long break between sessions. Or if you fancy something with a skop (and the Fugard foyer is too packed with authors), the Kimberley Hotel, Dias Tavern, Perseverance Tavern, German Club, Lefty’s and Roxy’s are all within walking distance* from Open Book HQ. (*Yes, Jo’burgers – you’ll be walking. A lot.)

7. ‘Book’ applies to more than the noun we devote our daily lives to. Tickets for popular sessions go faster than that first gulp of Leopard’s Leap after a marathon day of attending discussions on topics varying from normalising menstruation, to self-publishing, to the future of spec fic, and trusting sources in an age of public mistrust. Kanti, kry daai kaartjies!

8. We’ve all schlepped through Moby Dick, attempted/pretended to understand Ulysses, and written half-hearted essays on the significance of the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. But how many of us have ever attended a comic book workshop, a spoken word event, or a poetry reading? Enter Open Book – a festival which caters not only for English majors but all of those interested in the Art of Books and the Ways of Words.

Brava, OB 2018!


» read article

Open Book Festival: 5 – 9 September

Via Open Book

Be prepared to be engaged, inspired and entertained – the programme has been announced and ticket bookings are now open for the eighth Open Book Festival. The Festival takes place from 5 to 9 September and bookings can be made at www.webtickets.co.za.

Brought to you by the Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre, Open Book Festival offers a world-class selection of book launches, panel discussions, workshops, masterclasses, readings, performances, and more.

The festival also hosts the popular Comics Fest, #cocreatePoetica and various children’s and outreach programmes.

Venues for the event include the Fugard Theatre, District Six Homecoming Centre, the A4 Arts Foundation, and The Book Lounge in Cape Town, and are all within walking distance of one another. Selected events will also take place outside the city centre, such as at Elsies River Library and Molo Mhlaba School.

“We have put together a programme that we hope will appeal to book lovers of all interests and ages,” says Festival Director Mervyn Sloman. “The stimulating conversations that arise from the panel discussions, both during and after the event, are what make the Festival unique. We are always grateful to the authors who are so generous with their time and to the audience members for their willingness to openly engage in debate.

“Thanks to the support of our partners such as the Canada Council of the Arts, the French Institute of South Africa, the Swedish Embassy, the University of Stellenbosch and the Embassy of Argentina, we are able to bring you leading international authors such as Guy Delisle (Hostage),graphic artist duo Icinori, Jonas Bonnier (The Helicopter Heist), Nicole Dennis Benn (Here Comes the Sun) and Mariana Enriquez (Things We Lost in the Fire). Other international guests will include authors such as Aminatta Forna, Lesley Arimah, graphic novelist Mariko Tamaki and Adam Smyer, whose debut novel Knucklehead is a refreshingly honest, fierce and intelligent read. All this, in addition to the more than 100 incredible South African authors that are joining our programme.”

In association with #cocreateSA and the Dutch Consulate General, #cocreatePOETICA hosts a varied programme of readings, performances, discussions and workshops showcasing poetry and the spoken word. Experience the work of Dutch writer, performer and theatre director Babs Gons and musician and songwriter Ivan Words, alongside the cream of South African talent and celebrated spoken word organisations such as InZync, Lingua Franca, Grounding Sessions and Rioters in Session.

Open Book Festival once again teams up with the African Centre for Cities to present a number of events exploring urban issues. Inspired by the collection Feminism Is: South Africans Speak Their Truth, a series of Feminism Is talks will interrogate ideas of feminism, gender, patriarchy, sexual health and ownership of the body.

The Festival has become known for its focus on political and societal topics, and events will include discussions around the 2019 elections, a look at if our laws hinder or help us and the future of the media.

There’s also a strong recurring theme in the programme around loss, memory and personal transitions. Various events will give us a window into the authors’ worlds of writing and creating characters dealing with death and capturing the author’s own personal changes in their lives.

The fun-filled Writersports is a firm fixture on the Festival calendar and this year challenges writers with their Cringe Factor: Behind every success are 100 embarrassing failures!

The popular Comics Fest takes place on 8 and 9 September with the return of the Monster Battle Draw off, live drawings workshops, discussions and demonstrations, as well as a host of exciting exhibitors in the Comics Fest Marketplace. Don’t miss Dusanka Stojakovic of New Africa Books talking about what she is looking for in order to publish a comic book.

Younger visitors will feel welcomed at the Festival with a range of exciting activities including storytime at Central Library, Origami Demo Sessions and a workshop for teens to Create Your Own Character.

Longstanding partners Leopard’s Leap Wines will be hosting their wonderful #WordsforWine. Bring a pre-loved or new book to exchange for a glass of Leopard’s Leap wine. Books will be donated the Open Book Library Project and other charities.They’ll also be announcing the winner of their innovative #MessageonaBottle competition.

Open Book Festival has established itself as one of the most innovative literature festivals in South Africa. It has twice been shortlisted for the London Book Fair Excellence Awards. Last year, nearly 10 000 people attended the festival’s record 140 events, with ticket sales from previous years surpassed in the first two days. Open Book Festival is committed to creating a platform to celebrate South African writers, as well as hosting top international authors. The festival strives to instill a love of reading among young attendees, with the programme designed to create conversations among festival goers long after the event.

The 2018 programme is now available at www.openbookfestival.co.za.


» read article

Be engaged, entertained and inspired – bookings now open for eighth Open Book Festival

Via Open Book

Be prepared to be engaged, inspired and entertained – the programme has been announced and ticket bookings are now open for the eighth Open Book Festival. The Festival takes place from 5 to 9 September and bookings can be made at www.webtickets.co.za.

Brought to you by the Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre, Open Book Festival offers a world-class selection of book launches, panel discussions, workshops, masterclasses, readings, performances, and more.

The festival also hosts the popular Comics Fest, #cocreatePoetica and various children’s and outreach programmes.

Venues for the event include the Fugard Theatre, District Six Homecoming Centre, the A4 Arts Foundation, and The Book Lounge in Cape Town, and are all within walking distance of one another. Selected events will also take place outside the city centre, such as at Elsies River Library and Molo Mhlaba School.

“We have put together a programme that we hope will appeal to book lovers of all interests and ages,” says Festival Director Mervyn Sloman. “The stimulating conversations that arise from the panel discussions, both during and after the event, are what make the Festival unique. We are always grateful to the authors who are so generous with their time and to the audience members for their willingness to openly engage in debate.

“Thanks to the support of our partners such as the Canada Council of the Arts, the French Institute of South Africa, the Swedish Embassy, the University of Stellenbosch and the Embassy of Argentina, we are able to bring you leading international authors such as Guy Delisle (Hostage),graphic artist duo Icinori, Jonas Bonnier (The Helicopter Heist), Nicole Dennis Benn (Here Comes the Sun) and Mariana Enriquez (Things We Lost in the Fire). Other international guests will include authors such as Aminatta Forna, Lesley Arimah, graphic novelist Mariko Tamaki and Adam Smyer, whose debut novel Knucklehead is a refreshingly honest, fierce and intelligent read. All this, in addition to the more than 100 incredible South African authors that are joining our programme.”

In association with #cocreateSA and the Dutch Consulate General, #cocreatePOETICA hosts a varied programme of readings, performances, discussions and workshops showcasing poetry and the spoken word. Experience the work of Dutch writer, performer and theatre director Babs Gons and musician and songwriter Ivan Words, alongside the cream of South African talent and celebrated spoken word organisations such as InZync, Lingua Franca, Grounding Sessions and Rioters in Session.

Open Book Festival once again teams up with the African Centre for Cities to present a number of events exploring urban issues. Inspired by the collection Feminism Is: South Africans Speak Their Truth, a series of Feminism Is talks will interrogate ideas of feminism, gender, patriarchy, sexual health and ownership of the body.

The Festival has become known for its focus on political and societal topics, and events will include discussions around the 2019 elections, a look at if our laws hinder or help us and the future of the media.

There’s also a strong recurring theme in the programme around loss, memory and personal transitions. Various events will give us a window into the authors’ worlds of writing and creating characters dealing with death and capturing the author’s own personal changes in their lives.

The fun-filled Writersports is a firm fixture on the Festival calendar and this year challenges writers with their Cringe Factor: Behind every success are 100 embarrassing failures!

The popular Comics Fest takes place on 8 and 9 September with the return of the Monster Battle Draw off, live drawings workshops, discussions and demonstrations, as well as a host of exciting exhibitors in the Comics Fest Marketplace. Don’t miss Dusanka Stojakovic of New Africa Books talking about what she is looking for in order to publish a comic book.

Younger visitors will feel welcomed at the Festival with a range of exciting activities including storytime at Central Library, Origami Demo Sessions and a workshop for teens to Create Your Own Character.

Longstanding partners Leopard’s Leap Wines will be hosting their wonderful #WordsforWine. Bring a pre-loved or new book to exchange for a glass of Leopard’s Leap wine. Books will be donated the Open Book Library Project and other charities.They’ll also be announcing the winner of their innovative #MessageonaBottle competition.

Open Book Festival has established itself as one of the most innovative literature festivals in South Africa. It has twice been shortlisted for the London Book Fair Excellence Awards. Last year, nearly 10 000 people attended the festival’s record 140 events, with ticket sales from previous years surpassed in the first two days. Open Book Festival is committed to creating a platform to celebrate South African writers, as well as hosting top international authors. The festival strives to instill a love of reading among young attendees, with the programme designed to create conversations among festival goers long after the event.

The 2018 programme is now available at www.openbookfestival.co.za.


» read article

Cape Town Poetry Slam returns to the Mother City in 2018

This year in another collaboration between InZync Poetry, the Stellenbosch University Museum, the Bellville Public Library, Cape Town Central Library, the Fugard Theatre and Open Book Festival, the Cape Town Poetry Slam returns to Cape Town, with three prelim slams and a final slam at the Fugard Theatre on 8 September.

In 2018 we are looking for the second Cape Town Poetry Slam Champion! There will be three prelim slams, one in Stellenbosch, the second in Bellville and the third in Cape Town.

The top three poets from each of the prelims will move onto the second round, which is the final, at the Fugard Theatre in collaboration with the Open Book Festival, and the poets will battle it out for the title of Cape Town’s Poetry Slam Champion!

All of the prelims and the final will be hosted by amazing local poets such as Allison-Claire Hoskins, Roché Kester, Samora Magwa, Quaz Roodt and there will be live beats by DJ Deco.

The judges for this year’s slam are Cape Town rapper Jitsvinger, poetry slam champion, writer and performer Siphokazi Jonas and Lingua Franca spoken word movement director Mbongeni Nomkonwana. The final will also include a short performance by each of the judges.

MCs and judges at Cape Town Poetry Slam 2017

 
There are lots of prizes up for grabs for the winners of the prelims and the final, all to the value of R14 200. Cape Town’s Poetry Slam Champion will walk away with R2 500 in cash, a R500 Book Lounge voucher and a video poem to be produced by InZync!

The winners of each prelim will also participate in a workshop to prepare them to battle it out for the title of Cape Town’s Poetry Slam Champion. Budding poets can sign up on the day of each prelim, it is first come first serve, with a maximum of 25 sign ups per prelim.

The details of the three prelim slams are as follows:

Prelim 1: 11 August – Stellenbosch University Museum, 13:00
Prelim 2: 18 August – Bellville Public Library, 13:00
Prelim 3: 25 August – Cape Town Central Library, 13:00

The final is on 8 September at the Fugard Theatre at 20:00.

Tickets will be on sale for R50. Bookings will be open from early August and can be made at Webtickets.

For more details check out the InZync Poetry Sessions social media platforms:
Facebook – InZync Poetry Sessions, Instagram – @inzync_poetry, Twitter – @InZyncPoetry

About InZync Poetry

InZync Poetry is a Non-Profit Organization based in the Western Cape dedicated to the expansion of multilingual and multimodal poetry platforms in the Cape.

Our founders are Adrian ‘Diff’ van Wyk and Pieter Odendaal and together our team run poetry workshops with emerging poets called the INKredibles, and host poetry shows. In 2016 InZync collaborated with Koleka Putuma to create a video for her poem ‘Water’ and released an EP of poems called InterVerse. In 2017 InZync Poetry hosted the Cape Town Poetry Slam, and in 2018, we published the multilingual poetry anthology ConVerse in collaboration with Woordfees.

InZync has collaborated with many local and international poets to bring multilingual poetry to Cape audiences.


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World class artists line-up for Comics Fest 2018

Via Open Book

Brought to you under the Open Book Festival umbrella, the popular Comics Fest takes place on 8 and 9 September.

Comics Fest is an opportunity to engage with leading South African and international artists, illustrators and comic book creators. With a range of exciting activities, workshops, discussions and demonstrations, it’s a chance to unleash your inner geek – professional or amateur, young or old. The Open Book Comics Fest will again be running from the D6 Homecoming Centre and surrounding venues in Cape Town.

Brought to you by the Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre, Open Book Festival runs from 5 to 9 September and offers a world-class selection of book launches, panel discussions, workshops, masterclasses, readings, performances and more. In addition to Comics Fest, the Festival also hosts the popular #cocreatePoetica and various children’s and outreach programmes.

The bustling Comics Fest Marketplace will be home to organisations such as Stellenbosch Academy, the SAE Institute, Red and Yellow School, Tulips and Chimneys and the Unblush Collective. Engage with acclaimed creators such as Danelle Malan (Cottonstar), Roberto Millan (Squeers), Kay Carmichael (Sophie Giant-Slayer) and Mohale Mashigo (Kwezi) either at their stands on the Marketplace or at the discussions they will be involved in.

International artists joining Comics Fest this year include Canadian graphic novelist Guy Delisle who is renowned for his travelogues. His most recent book Hostage, was longlisted for Brooklyn Public Library’s 2017 literary prize and he was described by the The Guardian as “one of the greatest modern cartoonists”. Delisle joins Comics Fest thanks to the support of Canada Council of the Arts.

Mariko Tamaki, who also attends Comics Fest courtesy of the Canada Council of the Arts, is the author of Skim, Emiko Superstar, and This One Summer to name but a few. Her numerous accolades include a Joe Shuster Award, a Doug Wright Award in 2009, the 2015 Michael L. Printz Award and the German Rudolph-Dirks-Award in the category Youth Drama / Coming of Age. Tamaki has also been writing for both Marvel and DC Comics for two years.

Icinori, aka Mayumi Otero & Raphael Urwiller are a French duo whose collaborative efforts have seen them illustrate, design, print and publish works across a range of mediums. They have been commissioned by Le Monde, New York Times, Canal + and Wired among others. Their passion for design, image and form culminates in their publishing projects which has seen them produce over 30 books. Icinori join Comics Fest thanks to the support of The French Institute.

Artistes! (As per Open Book’s Comics Fest site)

 

“We’re really excited about all aspects of Comics Fest 2018 – we’ve got fantastic events lined up, an exciting Marketplace and a wonderful group of participants,” says Festival Co-ordinator Frankie Murrey.

Following its popularity last year, seasoned illustrator Andy Mason will again be hosting the Monster Battle Draw Off throughout the weekend. It’s a friendly competition that starts on Saturday where participants draw flat-out for 6 rounds! The winner will go through to Monster Battle 3 on Sunday and spectators are welcome.

Artists taking part include Allison Brennen, Amber Kneisel, Andrea Barkhuizen, Andy Mason, Any Body Zine, Ben Geldenhuys, Courtney Lawson-Peck, Danelle Malan, Daniel Clarke, David Griessel, Dianne Makings, Die Tuinhekkie, Frank Lunar, Gavin Thomson, Guy Delisle, Gwendolene van der Merwe, Hugh Upsher, Icinori, Illana Welman, Jess Bosworth Smith, Kalai Mydral-Ward, Katya Wagner, Kay Carmichael, Lara Corriea, Mariko Tamaki, Martin Mezzabotta, Max Whitehead, Maya LeMaitre, Mohale Mashigo, Nick L’Ange, Nompilo Sibisi, Pulane Boesak, Readers Den, Ree Treweek, Roberto Millan, Robyn-Jade Hosking, Ruby Lou, Sector Comics, Stephanie Simpson, Stephen Spinas, Su Opperman, Theo Key, Tulips and Chimneys and Ziyaad Rahman.

Comic Fest will take place on 8 September from 09h30 to 18h00 and on 9 September from 09h30 to 17h00.

All tickets for events on the Comics Fest programme need to be booked through Webtickets (www.webtickets.co.za) unless otherwise stipulated. Bookings will be open from early August.


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Leopard’s Leap, in collaboration with Open Book Fest, announces ‘Message on a Bottle’ competition!

Leopard’s Leap’s enthusiasm for literature is celebrated through its support of the Open Book Festival as well as an exciting annual competition focusing on an inventive way of combining the world of words with the world of wine. Entrants in previous years designed wine labels (2015), wrote haikus (2016) and shared delightful micro-stories in the 2017 flash fiction challenge.

The 2018 competition with the theme Message on a Bottle brings words and wine together in a way that is slightly nostalgic and promises the winning entrant exciting prizes and exposure.

“We love involving our supporters in our wine stories,” says Leopard’s Leap CEO Hein Koegelenberg.

“Sharing stories is at the heart of literature and is also such a big part of the hospitality around wine. We are delighted about our involvement with Cape Town’s Open Book Festival and would like to invite those who share our excitement for wine and words to enter the Message on a Bottle competition!”

Your challenge:

Combine words and wine and write a message for a bottle, using maximum 40 words, including at least three of the words below:

Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity

 
Your inspiration: Words and Wine

Have you always wanted to send your words into the world? Send us your entry as a Message on a Bottle – and stand a chance to win the following prizes:

• Cash prize of R5 000
• The winning Message on a Bottle will be the label for a specific Leopard’s Leap wine.
• 12 cases of Leopard’s Leap wine labelled with the winning Message on a Bottle.
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms
• Two Open Book Festival passes
• R500 Book Lounge voucher

Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys what is in the bottle!

Here are the rules:

• Competition opens for entries on Monday 16 July 2018
• Entries close on Sunday 5 August 2018 at midnight
• Judging to take place on Wednesday 15 August 2018
• Winner to be announced at the Open Book Festival Opening Bash on Tuesday 4 September 2018
• Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys a glass of wine! Use 3 of the following words to create a message on a bottle for our back label of 40 words or less
• Words: Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity
• No limit to number of entries per person
• E-mail your entry with contact details to: mailto:messageonabottle@leopardsleap.co.za
• Competition details and terms and conditions available at www.leopardsleap.co.za/messageonabottle
• The winning MESSAGE will be used as back label copy on a specific Leopard’s Leap wine that will be available to consumers in the domestic market
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries must be in English in order to comply with Leopard’s Leap back label regulations and requirements for sale in South Africa
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms (Facebook headers and posts, Twitter headers, website homepage, blog articles, newsletter and e-mail banners)
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be printed on various promotional items including posters, canvass and leaflets
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Judges: Hein Koegelenberg, Paige Nick, Mohale Mashigo and Pieter-Dirk Uys


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Open Box Library Project 2018

Open Book Festival has been committed to driving a love of books and reading amongst learners since its inception. Fundamental to this has been the Open Book School Library Project which has seen us put libraries into Matthew Goniwe Memorial High School, Parkhurst Primary and Westridge High School. The experience is one that has been hugely rewarding but which has also come with its own challenges.

As with all aspects of Open Book, we are constantly looking for ways to do things better and it is with this in mind that we reworked the library project to come up with something that doesn’t overwhelm, doesn’t require additional staff or space and which can be kept up to date with relatively little money. Welcome to Open Box! These mini mobile libraries are placed in classrooms, allowing teachers and learners access to the resource through the day.

St Mary’s Primary School
Located in the Cape Town CBD, St Mary’s Primary was ideally suited to be our pilot for the Open Box Project. Teachers showed huge interest in having access to books through the day in their classrooms, the school is within walking distance of the Book Lounge (which is closely associated with Open Book Festival) and learners at the school come predominantly from disenfranchised communities.

2015 – 2017:
2015 saw us piloting the Open Box project and we are delighted with how it worked. In total we placed 3 boxes at St Mary’s Primary and they are now in daily use in the Grade R, 1 and 2 classrooms. In 2016, we placed an additional 3 boxes in the Grade 3, 4 and 5 classrooms and in 2017, we placed boxes in the Grade 6 and 7 classrooms. The boxes include books, games, materials for activities and other resources that are relevant to both teachers and learners. Tied to the boxes, were the events we ran there through the year, from readings and activities through to author visits.

Selection Process:
We include at least 5 books per learner in each box. We meet with teachers ahead of purchasing so that they can outline the kinds of books that will best suit them, both in terms of their curricula and challenges faced by their learners. Those conversations enable us to stock each box with titles most relevant to both learners and teachers. The titles include a mix of fiction and non-fiction titles as well as books in different languages and aimed at different reading ages.

2018:
While we have completed the box handovers at St Mary’s, our relationship with them will continue and where possible we will organise events for learners. The focus of Open Box though will shift and we identified Siyazingisa Primary School in Gugulethu as the school we are working with for the next few years. The school is part of the same circuit as St Mary’s (Circuit 2).

The principal is Mrs Nonkonyana. She has been based at the school for over 20 years and is excited to be working with us on this. There are 3 Grade R classes and those will be our starting point. We met with the principal and teachers at the end of 2017 to discuss what books would be most relevant to their classrooms and we will be working on getting those together in the coming months. There are roughly 35 learners in each class and we will be aiming for a 5:1 ratio of books to learners. Ideally the majority of those books will be in isiXhosa.

The proposed dates for the handovers are:
23 April 2018: 3 boxes handed over with partial supply of books to each box
7 June 2018: Partial supply of books to each box
31 July 2018: Final supply of books to each box
The dates listed above may change. Each of the handovers will be linked to storytelling

Contact Frankie Murrey (Open Book Festival coordinator) for more information: +27 82 958 7332 / frankie@openbookfestival.co.za


 

 

 

 


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Record numbers at Open Book Festival 2017

It’s been a record breaking event for the seventh Open Book Festival which took place from 6 to 10 September.

The Festival is presented by the Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre, with venues also including the A4 Arts Foundation, District Six Homecoming Centre, Central Library, Elsie’s River Library, Kuyasa Library, and PH Centre.

With more than 140 events on offer, making it the biggest festival yet, nearly ten thousand people attended the Festival with last year’s ticket sales figures surpassed in the first two days.

The Festival presents a world-class selection of panel discussions, workshops, readings, performances and more, designed to inspire, stimulate and entertain audiences, featuring more than one hundred local and international authors.

“We are overwhelmed at the phenomenal response to this year’s Festival,” says Festival Director Mervyn Sloman. “One marker of the enthusiasm people have for the festival and its participants can certainly be seen in what books have been bought and it comes as no surprise to us that holding the number one position is Pumla Gqola’s brand new title, Reflecting Rogue.

“Our off-programme schools line up has also proved a great success this year. Learners at Camps Bay and Groote Schuur schools were captivated by Alex Wheatle, the winner of the Guardian Children’s Fiction Award 2016. They didn’t want to move when their morning break bell rang marking the end of the session!

“Once again the generosity of the authors with their time has been incredible – Man Booker Prize winner Paul Beatty spent more than two hours signing books and talking to audience members despite being sick. The willingness of audiences to openly engage in the topics being discussed is also inspiring,” adds Sloman.

Man Booker Prize winner Paul Beatty signs copies of his book The Sellout

 

Events at Central Library for younger visitors were sold out and the organisers will be looking at adding additional events next year.

The partnerships with PLAAS presenting a series of events on access to land, and the discussions around cities curated by the African Centre for Cities, were all engaging and insightful. Following the huge success of #cocreatePOETICA last year, the 2017 line-up included Dutch poets Akwasi, Dean Bowen and Sjaan Flikweert. Poet Riyo from Kuils River was the winner of the Cape Town Poetry Slam.

“Congratulations also to Verushka Louw, who won the #FlashFiction #Twitterature competition, run by our fabulous sponsor Leopard’s Leap Wines who have supported us since year one of the Festival. Their #WordsforWine initiative was a great success and collected hundreds of books for the Open Book Library Project,” says Sloman.

The eighth Open Book Festival takes place from 5 to 9 September 2018. For further information visit www.openbookfestival.co.za


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