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Archive for the ‘Open Book Cape Town’ Category

Leopard’s Leap, in collaboration with Open Book Fest, announces ‘Message on a Bottle’ competition!

Leopard’s Leap’s enthusiasm for literature is celebrated through its support of the Open Book Festival as well as an exciting annual competition focusing on an inventive way of combining the world of words with the world of wine. Entrants in previous years designed wine labels (2015), wrote haikus (2016) and shared delightful micro-stories in the 2017 flash fiction challenge.

The 2018 competition with the theme Message on a Bottle brings words and wine together in a way that is slightly nostalgic and promises the winning entrant exciting prizes and exposure.

“We love involving our supporters in our wine stories,” says Leopard’s Leap CEO Hein Koegelenberg.

“Sharing stories is at the heart of literature and is also such a big part of the hospitality around wine. We are delighted about our involvement with Cape Town’s Open Book Festival and would like to invite those who share our excitement for wine and words to enter the Message on a Bottle competition!”

Your challenge:

Combine words and wine and write a message for a bottle, using maximum 40 words, including at least three of the words below:

Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity

 
Your inspiration: Words and Wine

Have you always wanted to send your words into the world? Send us your entry as a Message on a Bottle – and stand a chance to win the following prizes:

• Cash prize of R5 000
• The winning Message on a Bottle will be the label for a specific Leopard’s Leap wine.
• 12 cases of Leopard’s Leap wine labelled with the winning Message on a Bottle.
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Winning Message on a Bottle to be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms
• Two Open Book Festival passes
• R500 Book Lounge voucher

Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys what is in the bottle!

Here are the rules:

• Competition opens for entries on Monday 16 July 2018
• Entries close on Sunday 5 August 2018 at midnight
• Judging to take place on Wednesday 15 August 2018
• Winner to be announced at the Open Book Festival Opening Bash on Tuesday 4 September 2018
• Share a message on a bottle with someone who enjoys a glass of wine! Use 3 of the following words to create a message on a bottle for our back label of 40 words or less
• Words: Share, Quality, Story(ies), Time, Mellifluous, Taste, Vellichor, Aroma, Journey, Serendipity
• No limit to number of entries per person
• E-mail your entry with contact details to: mailto:messageonabottle@leopardsleap.co.za
• Competition details and terms and conditions available at www.leopardsleap.co.za/messageonabottle
• The winning MESSAGE will be used as back label copy on a specific Leopard’s Leap wine that will be available to consumers in the domestic market
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries must be in English in order to comply with Leopard’s Leap back label regulations and requirements for sale in South Africa
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be used by Leopard’s Leap and Open Book Festival on digital platforms (Facebook headers and posts, Twitter headers, website homepage, blog articles, newsletter and e-mail banners)
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be printed on various promotional items including posters, canvass and leaflets
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Open Book Festival venues
• MESSAGE ON A BOTTLE entries may be displayed at Leopard’s Leap Family Vineyards in Franschhoek
• Judges: Hein Koegelenberg, Paige Nick, Mohale Mashigo and Pieter-Dirk Uys


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Open Box Library Project 2018

Open Book Festival has been committed to driving a love of books and reading amongst learners since its inception. Fundamental to this has been the Open Book School Library Project which has seen us put libraries into Matthew Goniwe Memorial High School, Parkhurst Primary and Westridge High School. The experience is one that has been hugely rewarding but which has also come with its own challenges.

As with all aspects of Open Book, we are constantly looking for ways to do things better and it is with this in mind that we reworked the library project to come up with something that doesn’t overwhelm, doesn’t require additional staff or space and which can be kept up to date with relatively little money. Welcome to Open Box! These mini mobile libraries are placed in classrooms, allowing teachers and learners access to the resource through the day.

St Mary’s Primary School
Located in the Cape Town CBD, St Mary’s Primary was ideally suited to be our pilot for the Open Box Project. Teachers showed huge interest in having access to books through the day in their classrooms, the school is within walking distance of the Book Lounge (which is closely associated with Open Book Festival) and learners at the school come predominantly from disenfranchised communities.

2015 – 2017:
2015 saw us piloting the Open Box project and we are delighted with how it worked. In total we placed 3 boxes at St Mary’s Primary and they are now in daily use in the Grade R, 1 and 2 classrooms. In 2016, we placed an additional 3 boxes in the Grade 3, 4 and 5 classrooms and in 2017, we placed boxes in the Grade 6 and 7 classrooms. The boxes include books, games, materials for activities and other resources that are relevant to both teachers and learners. Tied to the boxes, were the events we ran there through the year, from readings and activities through to author visits.

Selection Process:
We include at least 5 books per learner in each box. We meet with teachers ahead of purchasing so that they can outline the kinds of books that will best suit them, both in terms of their curricula and challenges faced by their learners. Those conversations enable us to stock each box with titles most relevant to both learners and teachers. The titles include a mix of fiction and non-fiction titles as well as books in different languages and aimed at different reading ages.

2018:
While we have completed the box handovers at St Mary’s, our relationship with them will continue and where possible we will organise events for learners. The focus of Open Box though will shift and we identified Siyazingisa Primary School in Gugulethu as the school we are working with for the next few years. The school is part of the same circuit as St Mary’s (Circuit 2).

The principal is Mrs Nonkonyana. She has been based at the school for over 20 years and is excited to be working with us on this. There are 3 Grade R classes and those will be our starting point. We met with the principal and teachers at the end of 2017 to discuss what books would be most relevant to their classrooms and we will be working on getting those together in the coming months. There are roughly 35 learners in each class and we will be aiming for a 5:1 ratio of books to learners. Ideally the majority of those books will be in isiXhosa.

The proposed dates for the handovers are:
23 April 2018: 3 boxes handed over with partial supply of books to each box
7 June 2018: Partial supply of books to each box
31 July 2018: Final supply of books to each box
The dates listed above may change. Each of the handovers will be linked to storytelling

Contact Frankie Murrey (Open Book Festival coordinator) for more information: +27 82 958 7332 / frankie@openbookfestival.co.za


 

 

 

 


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Record numbers at Open Book Festival 2017

It’s been a record breaking event for the seventh Open Book Festival which took place from 6 to 10 September.

The Festival is presented by the Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre, with venues also including the A4 Arts Foundation, District Six Homecoming Centre, Central Library, Elsie’s River Library, Kuyasa Library, and PH Centre.

With more than 140 events on offer, making it the biggest festival yet, nearly ten thousand people attended the Festival with last year’s ticket sales figures surpassed in the first two days.

The Festival presents a world-class selection of panel discussions, workshops, readings, performances and more, designed to inspire, stimulate and entertain audiences, featuring more than one hundred local and international authors.

“We are overwhelmed at the phenomenal response to this year’s Festival,” says Festival Director Mervyn Sloman. “One marker of the enthusiasm people have for the festival and its participants can certainly be seen in what books have been bought and it comes as no surprise to us that holding the number one position is Pumla Gqola’s brand new title, Reflecting Rogue.

“Our off-programme schools line up has also proved a great success this year. Learners at Camps Bay and Groote Schuur schools were captivated by Alex Wheatle, the winner of the Guardian Children’s Fiction Award 2016. They didn’t want to move when their morning break bell rang marking the end of the session!

“Once again the generosity of the authors with their time has been incredible – Man Booker Prize winner Paul Beatty spent more than two hours signing books and talking to audience members despite being sick. The willingness of audiences to openly engage in the topics being discussed is also inspiring,” adds Sloman.

Man Booker Prize winner Paul Beatty signs copies of his book The Sellout

 

Events at Central Library for younger visitors were sold out and the organisers will be looking at adding additional events next year.

The partnerships with PLAAS presenting a series of events on access to land, and the discussions around cities curated by the African Centre for Cities, were all engaging and insightful. Following the huge success of #cocreatePOETICA last year, the 2017 line-up included Dutch poets Akwasi, Dean Bowen and Sjaan Flikweert. Poet Riyo from Kuils River was the winner of the Cape Town Poetry Slam.

“Congratulations also to Verushka Louw, who won the #FlashFiction #Twitterature competition, run by our fabulous sponsor Leopard’s Leap Wines who have supported us since year one of the Festival. Their #WordsforWine initiative was a great success and collected hundreds of books for the Open Book Library Project,” says Sloman.

The eighth Open Book Festival takes place from 5 to 9 September 2018. For further information visit www.openbookfestival.co.za


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Comics Fest programme is cooking at Open Book Festival

Brought to you under the Open Book Festival umbrella, the popular Comics Fest takes place on 9 and 10 September. With an array of activities, workshops, discussions and demonstrations, the sizzling hot programme is cooking with events that will delight fans of comic books, illustration and design – professional or amateur, young or old. The Open Book Comics Fest will again be running from the D6 Homecoming Centre and surrounding venues in Cape Town.

Seasoned illustrator Andy Mason will be hosting the Monster Battle Draw Off throughout the weekend, a friendly competition that starts on Saturday where you will be drawing flat-out for 6 rounds! Aspirant comic artists are welcome. The winner will go through to Monster Battle 3 on Sunday. Drawings will be auctioned to raise funds for future drawing workshops for young artists. Spectators are welcome.

Animation guru Mike Scott shares some skills in the Comics Fest Demo session on Saturday 9 September, or catch Hugh Upsher and Martin Mezzabota on Sunday 10thto learn how to create a zine from start to finish, and try your hand and making one.

On Saturday 9 September, Jess Bosworth (Unblush) and André Bozack (Art Facilitator at Heal the Hood, schools & Community Centres) speak to Kay Carmichael about challenges under-represented groups face entering the world of illustration and comic book creation in Skills and Space.

Schools learners should catch Draw Your Own Superhero on 7 September with Roberto Millan and Su Opperman to create a super-hero of your very own, and lose yourself in a word of comic books, original artwork and zines at the Open Book Marketplace that weekend.

“Comics Fest has been an integral part of the Open Book Festival programme and has proved to be a melting pot of ideas, connections, opportunities and inspirations and we are delighted to welcome the creators to the 2017 edition,” says Festival Co-ordinator Frankie Murrey. “Look out for our limited edition bags for sale on the Comics Fest Marketplace floor, which are the result of an initiative with uHlanga Press. Artists were asked to create an original artwork inspired by the words of some of the local poets they publish, which were transposed onto the bags. Funds raised go towards Open Box Library Project.”

Artists participating in Comics Fest include: André Bozack, Andy Mason, Ashe Ah-Sing, Ben Geldenhuys, Ben Winfield, Caitlin Mkhasibe, Carla Botes, Clyde Beech, Danelle Malan, Daniël Hugo, Danielle Albertyn, David du Plessis, Deon de Lange, Dianne Makings, Frank Lunar, Gabriel Metcalfe, Gabriella Jardine, Hugh Upsher, Jess Bosworth Smith, Karl Schulschenk, Kay Carmichael, Kit Beukes, LoyisoMkize, Martin Mezzabotta, Maya LeMaitre, Moray Rhoda, Nick L’Ange, Nina Pfeiffer, Readers Den, ReeTreweek, Roberto Millan, Robyn-Jade Hosking, Sector Comics, Sjaka S. Septembir, Su Opperman, Unblush Collective, Wessie van der Westhuizen, Zapiro and Ziyaad Rahman.

For full details see http://openbookfestival.co.za/events/comics-fest. Visit the individual author pages on the website for a list of the events in which they are participating.

Comic Fest will take place on 9 September from 09h30 to 18h00 and on 10 September from 09h30 to 17h00.

All tickets for events on the Comics Fest programme need to be booked through Webtickets (www.webtickets.co.za) unless otherwise stipulated.

The seventh Open Book Festival will take place from 6 to 10 September at The Fugard Theatre, District Six Homecoming Centre, A4 Arts Foundation, Central Library Cape Town and The Book Lounge from 10:00 to 21:00 each day. For further information visit www.openbookfestival.co.za

The Open Book Festival is made possible thanks to the support of its sponsors and partners: Leopard’s Leap, The Fugard Theatre, The District Six Museum, Snapplify, Open Society Foundation, Kingdom of the Netherlands, City of Cape Town, Townhouse Hotel, Penguin Random House, NB Publishers, Jonathan Ball Publishers, Pan Macmillan Publishers, The French Institute of South Africa, The Canada Council for the Arts, African Centre for Cities, PLAAS, NORLA, the Embassy of Finland, the Embassy of Sweden, Dutch Foundation for Literature, PEN SA, the Confucius Institute and the Goethe-Institut.


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Open Book Festival 2017 (6 – 10 September)

The full programme of events has been announced for the seventh Open Book Festival. The Festival takes place from 6 to 10 September, and this year there are more than 140 exciting events to choose from.

Brought to you by the Book Lounge and The Fugard Theatre, venues also include the A4 Arts Foundation, District Six Homecoming Centre, Central Library, Elsie’s River Library, Kuyasa Library, and PH Centre. The Festival presents a world-class selection of panel discussions, workshops, readings, performances and more, designed to inspire, stimulate and entertain audiences, featuring more than one hundred local and international authors.

“We are proud to be announcing our biggest Festival yet, and we thank everyone who supported our Thundafund campaign, which has, in part, enabled us to compile this year’s extensive programme,” says Festival Director Mervyn Sloman.

“We have once again worked hard to bring you a phenomenal line up of South African and international authors across a range of genres talking about topics that are engaging, relevant and thought-provoking,” says Sloman. “The nature of the open discussions and debates between authors and audiences and the conversations that continue beyond the event, are what make the Festival unique.”

Key to the success of the festival has been collaborations with partners and 2017 is no different. There is a series of four events focusing on access to land curated by PLAAS and audiences can look forward to a similar segment of programming themed around cities curated by the African Centre for Cities. In addition to the strong political content the festival has become known for, there are multiple opportunities to engage with your favourite local writers as well as some exciting voices from around the world. Paul Beatty, the current Man Booker winner will be a highlight for many. A strong selection of writers from other parts of the continent will also be featured – names to look out for include Chibundu Onuzo, Fiston Mwanza Mujila and Ayobami Adebayo.

There are several books that will be launched at the festival, including Bonang Matheba’s From A to B, Pumla Gqola’s, Reflecting Rogue, Glynnis Breytenbach’s Rule of Law, Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh’s Democracy and Delusions, Mark Shaw’s Hitmen for Hire and Prince Mashele’s Fall of the ANC Continues.

Following the huge success of #cocreatePOETICA last year, this year’s line-up includes Dutch poets Akwasi, Dean Bowen and Sjaan Flikweert, headline names such as Koleka Putuma, Toni Stuart, Gabeba Baderoon and Jolyn Phillips. InZync returns to the Open Book stage as does the Open Book Poetry Slam. Lingua Franca Spoken Word Movement is also joining the line-up.

There’s plenty of excitement and entertainment for the younger visitors – Central Library will be home to a range of events for children on Saturday the 9thSeptember. Don’t miss ‘Storytime in the Gardens’ on Friday the 8th September, an initiative between Central Library and Open Book which will feature a host of local storytellers. Alex Wheatle, winner of the 2016 Guardian Children’s Fiction Award, will be at the festival doing events at schools, public libraries as well as on the main festival programme.

Comics Fest takes place on 9 and 10 September with an array of activities, workshops, discussions and demonstrations for illustrators, designers and comic book lovers. This year seasoned illustrator Andy Mason will be hosting the Monster Battle Draw Off throughout the weekend.

“Our partners Leopard’s Leap Wines will again host their fantastic #WordsforWine. Bring a pre-loved or new book to exchange for a glass of Leopard’s Leap wine.Books will be donated the Open Book Library Project and other charities. Check the programme for times. They will also be announcing the winner of their innovative Flash Fiction competition,” adds Sloman.

The 2017 programme is now available at www.openbookfestival.co.za.

Visit the individual author pages on the website for a list of the events in which they are participating.

The seventh Open Book Festival will take place from 6 to 10 September at The Fugard Theatre, District Six Homecoming Centre, A4 Arts Foundation, PH Centre, Central Library Cape Town, Elsie’s River Library, Kuyasa Library and The Book Lounge from 10:00 to 21:00 each day. For further information visit www.openbookfestival.co.za

Tickets to events range from R45 to R100. Day Passes (which provide one access ticket to six events per day) are R150 and Festival Passes (5 Day Passes with one ticket access to six events per day) cost R600. There are also a number of free events but tickets must still be booked for these events to secure a place.

Bookings are through Webtickets www.webtickets.co.za

The Open Book Festival is made possible thanks to the support of its sponsors and partners: Leopard’s Leap, The Fugard Theatre, The District Six Museum, Snapplify, Open Society Foundation, Kingdom of the Netherlands, City of Cape Town, Townhouse Hotel, Penguin Random House, NB Publishers, Jonathan Ball Publishers, Pan Macmillan Publishers, The French Institute of South Africa, The Canada Council for the Arts, African Centre for Cities, PLAAS, NORLA, the Embassy of Finland, the Embassy of Sweden, Dutch Foundation for Literature, PEN SA, the Confucius Institute and the Goethe-Institut.


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Pretend you are in a dark room: Elnathan John presents 3 questions to ask yourself to avoid the pitfalls of identity politics in writing

Writers should pretend they are going into a dark room and move delicately, slowly, carefully so that they do not disrupt the balance of things. – Elnathan John

Elnathan John’s 3 questions to avoid the pitfalls of cultural appropriation in writing

 
Born on a TuesdayElnathan John shared his three rules for writing about other people’s experiences and communities.

John was a guest of the Open Book Festival in Cape Town, to chat about his debut novel, Born on a Tuesday.

Born on a Tuesday is a coming of age tale about a young Muslim boy who left his home to study Islam and ended up joining a gang of street kids. He and his friends are recruited to cause trouble during an election, and when violence breaks out he is forced to flee. He finds shelter at a mosque run by a kindly imam who takes a liking to him.

The book has earned praise all over the world and from some high profile authors and critics, including Petina Gappah, Taiye Selasi and Uzodinma Iweala. John was also recently shortlisted for the Nigeria Prize for Literature – along with Chika Unigwe for Night Dancer and Abubakar Adam Ibrahim for Season of Crimson Blossoms – an award worth $100,000 (about R1,4 million).

John grew up in northern Nigeria, but is not Muslim himself. At a panel titled Notions of Nationhood, where he shared the stage with Danish-Norwegian novelist Kim Leine, chair Andrew Brown asked him: “Are we entitled to write about other communities, other nations, from our own perspective?”

The question was topical, as We Need to Talk About Kevin author Lionel Shriver had caused a walkout just days before at the Brisbane Writers Festival in Australia with her keynote address, “Fiction and Identity Politics”, which many other writers considered culturally insensitive.

Elnathan John at the 2016 Open Book FestivalIn answering Brown’s question, John asked: “Is anyone entitled to anything? Does any experience belong solely to one person?”, and shared a story from his childhood to illustrate his point.

“My brother died in 2003. One of the biggest issues I had with my family was that at some point my parents were upset that I seemed to be grieving more than other people. It was almost like they were saying, ‘He was our child, we raised him, we gave birth to him, we put him through school. We have a greater loss than you. You cannot mourn more than us. Stop being a complete asshole.’

“And so the question that has always been in my mind is, to whom does any experience belong?

“I didn’t think I owned this experience, but I thought I was an integral part of it, being that I removed his body from the water, I did mouth to mouth; the last moments of his life were in my hands. I thought, well, I certainly should have a right to this experience. But even in this very close experience, I was being challenged. So you can challenge any experience.

“For me, what is important is not whether a person owns an experience they want to write about. Most experiences are external to us. If you have a female character and you are male, that experience is external to you. If you are writing about other nations, they’re external to you. Even if you are writing about your own nation, most of the experiences will be those you’ve not had.”

John said that instead of agonising over who the experience belongs to, writers should consider three questions before they start writing a story.

“What a writer needs is a certain level of empathy that allows us to show respect for the subject. That empathy, normally, would lead people to determine for themselves: One, if they should write a story. Two, if it is time to write that story. And three, how that story should be written, with the respect that it deserves. And if one cannot answer these three questions, then one should not write the story.

“Often people tell writers to write what they know. I like to say the writer should write what they want to know. What that does is that it pushes you into a dark space. And in a dark space you are more careful.

“Writers should pretend they are going into a dark room and move delicately, slowly, carefully so that they do not disrupt the balance of things.”

Read an excerpt from Born on a Tuesday here

Jennifer Malec (@projectjennifer) tweeted live from the event:

Main author image courtesy of Elnathan John on Twitter; image composite by Books LIVE/Secondary author image Retha Ferguson

Related news:

 

Book details


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‘The Zulu part of me was taken’ – Nomavenda Mathiane tells her grandmother’s story, beginning as a child during the Anglo-Zulu War

nomavenda mathiane

 

Eyes in the Night

In Eyes in the Night, respected journalist and author Nomavenda Mathiane tells the story of her grandmother, who was a child during the Anglo-Zulu War.

Mathiane is at the Open Book Festival in Cape Town, where she shared a panel with Daniel Browde, author of The Relatively Public Life Of Jules Browde, and Marianne Thamm, whose memoir Hitler, Verwoerd, Mandela and Me was recently released.
 

Mathiane explained how she “stumbled” into her grandmother’s story.

“My mother died when I was about 66 years old,” she said, “and after her funeral we were seated at the table with my brothers and sisters, and casually I turned to my older sister, and I said ‘Mum never used to tell us about her mother, why is it so?’ And frankly I didn’t think she was going to answer me, but lo and behold she said, ‘It’s because her mother’s story was too sad.’”

Mathiane says she remembers her grandmother as an imposing and capable presence, but her early years were far more precarious.

“I knew gogo as this big woman who could make cheese, could make butter, could make soap. All the things we could not afford, because my parents were officers in the Salvation Army, so there wasn’t much money around.

“But my sister told me that gogo was 10 during the Anglo-Zulu War. She was hiding in the caves with her mother and her little sister. Her father, who was the chief inDuna of King Cetshwayo, was killed during the war, and when they went back their land had been taken, their homes had been destroyed, she doesn’t have a father, her mother doesn’t have a husband. Then the Zulu culture kicks in. The brother must marry her mother. She says, no ways. They make her uncomfortable, and they flee the homestead.”

There began an extraordinary story, and Mathiane says she felt shocked that she had never heard it before.

“My sister was telling me this, and I couldn’t take it. My mother had died without telling us these stories. When you look at how her mother suffered, you realise that the story was too painful. But more than that, we were growing up in the 70s and the Struggle was gaining momentum. Between themselves my father and my mother decided that they mustn’t tell us the story, because because we would get so angry that we would walk straight into the liberation movements. But we ended up getting involved anyway; you couldn’t live in the township and not get involved.”

Mathiane says at times while writing the book she felt angry that a part of her culture and history had been denied her.

“The story of my grandmother has been a journey for me. I grew up in the townships, and I knew very little about Zulu ways. I’d never been to Zululand except on the occasional visit. Even Zulu language, I knew Zulu as a spoken language, but in a language there are idioms and expressions that I wasn’t familiar with. Of course I had heard of the Battle of Isandlwana, but I never knew about the warriors, the generals, what actually happened.

“The sad part is that our parents didn’t talk to us about these things. So the book took me to various areas. Sometimes I would get so angry that I was denied, I was impoverished by being raised in the township. Because there’s a part of me that was cut off, that I didn’t know about. It was just a Christian upbringing, period. And yet there was the other side of me, the African in me, that was never discussed. None of the Zulu rituals were performed. We were Christian girls. The Zulu part of me was taken.”

Mathiane says she hopes her book helps to “inculcate a sense of questioning”.

“Young children, both black and white, must question their parents, their grandparents: where do we come from? You cannot know where you are going, if you don’t know where you come from. It’s time that we told our own narratives. This is the first book of the victims of the Ango-Zulu War. Nobody has ever written about what ordinary Zulu people went through. I would implore you to talk to your children.”

Book details


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Open Book Festival shortlisted for London Book Fair International Excellence Award

 
Alert! The Open Book Festival has been shortlisted for a 2016 London Book Fair International Excellence Award in the category Literary Festivals.

The other events up for The Literary Festival Award are The Krakow Festival (Poland), Flupp (Brazil) and FLIP (Festa Literaria Internacional de Paraty) (Brazil).

“It is an honour we share with all the authors who have joined us and given so much during events over the years,” the Open Book organisers said on their website. “And of course, the audiences who have been so vital in transforming discussions into meaningful engagement on so many different topics.

Other awards include The Bookstore of the Year Award, The Publishers Weekly Literary Translation Initiative Award, a number of publishers’ awards and The Bookseller Adult Trade Publisher Award.

London Book Fair director Jacks Thomas said: “Now in their third year, the LBF International Excellence Awards are a one-stop showcase for some fantastic innovation and sheer determination to get books and content into the hands of consumers in a variety of classical and creative ways. Just looking at the shortlists makes me want to shout a big three cheers for the global publishing industry and all who work in it!”

The Open Book Festival is held annually in Cape Town.

Congratulations from Books LIVE!


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Photos from the 2015 Open Book Festival

The 2015 Open Book Festival is in full swing with writers, readers and everyone in between gathered in Cape Town for the biggest boekjol Cape Town has ever seen!

Thanks to the wonders of Twitter, you can follow all the social media chatter associated with the event.

The Books LIVE team will be tweeting live from the festival: Jennifer Malec (@projectjennifer), Helené Prinsloo (@helenayp), Erin Devenish (@ErinDevenish811), Annetjie van Wynegaard (@Annetjievw) – so give us a follow for all the latest and greatest.

Liesl Jobson is out and about too and has taken some great photographs of all the action.

See if you can spot your favourite author, or even yourself:

Opening ceremony:

The 2015 Open Book Festival opened with a bang last night at The Book Lounge and Liesl Jobson was there to snap all the action. Can you spot your favourite author?

Posted by Books LIVE on Tuesday, 8 September 2015

 

Day 1: 9 September 2015
 

Photos from the first day of the 2015 Open Book Festival, happening in Cape Town from 9 – 13 September.Books LIVE…

Posted by Books LIVE on Thursday, 10 September 2015

 

 
Day 2: 10 September 2015
 

Photos from the second day of the 2015 Open Book Festival, happening in Cape Town from 9 – 13 SeptemberBooks LIVE…

Posted by Books LIVE on Friday, 11 September 2015

Day 3: 11 September 2015
 

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Photos from the third day of the 2015 Open Book Festival, happening in Cape Town from 9 – 13 SeptemberBooks LIVE…

Posted by Books LIVE on Saturday, 12 September 2015


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The 2015 Open Book Festival Starts Today! – Photographs from the Opening Ceremony

Mervyn Sloman and Debbie Poswell

 
The 2015 Open Book Festival starts today and already the streets of Cape Town are bustling with bookish activity.

This morning, Books LIVE’s deputy editor Helené Prinsloo (@helenayp) and assistant editor Erin Devenish (@ErinDevenish811) started their day by interviewing authors Helen Macdonald (H is for Hawk) and Laura van den Berg (Find Me):

 
Last night, the Open Book Festival kicked off at The Book Lounge with a smashing authors’ party. Liesl Jobson (@liesljobson) covered the gig:

Have a look at photographs from the opening ceremony:

Facebook gallery

 

 
Here’s a round-up of all the activities you can look forward to at this year’s Open Book:

 
The festival will be covered by Books LIVE editor Jennifer Malec (@projectjennifer), deputy editor Helené Prinsloo (@helenayp), assistant editors Erin Devenish (@ErinDevenish811), Annetjie van Wynegaard (@Annetjievw) and Jennifer Platt (@Jenniferdplatt) of the Sunday Times.

Keep an eye on our Facebook page (Facebook.com/BooksLIVESA) and our Twitter profile (@BooksLIVESA) for more information and pictures!
 

Follow all the social media chatter associated with the event:


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