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Alert! The programme for this year’s @OpenBookFest has been revealed! Click here to see it: fb.me/3EVHbDBFa

Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

2014 Open Book Festival Programme (17 – 21 September)

Open Book

Alert! The programme for this year’s Open Book Festival has been revealed, with a number of exciting events on the agenda.

The festival kicks off midweek, on Wednesday, 17 September, and runs until Sunday, 21 September. Events will be held at various venues in Cape Town’s Eastern district, with The Fugard Theatre as the central hub once again. Other venues include The Book Lounge, the Homecoming Centre, the District 6 Museum and the Central Library.

International authors to look forward to include Geoff Dyer, Taiye Selasi, Billy Kahora, Tony Park, Philip Hensher, Raymond E Feist, Mike Carey, Sefi Atta, Satoshi Kitamura, Kader Abdolah and Keyi Sheng, as well as South African authors based overseas Jonny Steinberg and Wilbur Smith. Marguerite Poland, whose The Keeper was published this month, is another name to look out for.

Jeff in Venice, Death in VaranasiThe KeeperGhana Must GoThe True Story of David Munyakei, Goldenberg WhistleblowerDark HeartThe Missing InkMagician's EndThe Girl with All the GiftsA Bit of DifferencePot-San's Tabletop TalesThe House of the MosqueNorthern GirlsA Man of Good HopeDesert God

No fewer than seven books will be launched at this year’s festival. On Thursday, Tiah Beautement launches her novel This Day with Zukiswa Wanner, and Ray Hartley will launch his new book Ragged Glory: The Rainbow Nation in Black and White.

On Friday, Wilbur Smith will launch his much-anticipated new novel, Desert God, with Tony Park, while Sampie Terreblanche launches his magnum opus: Western Empires: Christianity, and the Inequalities Between the West and the Rest 1500 – 2010.

Jonny Steinberg’s new book, A Man of Good Hope will be launched on Saturday, Mervyn Sloman.

Finally, on Sunday Songezo Zibi will launch Raising the Bar: Hope and Renewal in South Africa with Richard Calland, and Malaika wa Azania will launch her controversial new book Memoirs of a Born Free with TO Molefe.

This DayRagged GloryWestern EmpiresRaising the BarMemoirs of a Born Free

In the very first session of the festival, Poland will be in conversation with Hensher and Melissa Siebert, in a Book Club Morning chaired by Michele Magwood. Later in the day, Dyer will be chatting to Imraan Coovadia and Hedley Twidle about the “Art of the Essay”. Kahora, who was shortlisted for this year’s Caine Prize for African Writing, will be discussing the “Genius of the Short Story” with Felicitas Hoppe and Karen Jennings in a session chaired by Rachel Zadok.

In the evening, events to look out for include “15 Million Copies Sold”, featuring Feist and Sarah Lotz, and “Author as Ambassador”, in which Zakes Mda and Deon Meyer talk to Margie Orford about representing South Africa to the rest of the world.

Afrikaanse boekwurms kan met André P Brink, Karin Brynard, Henry Cloete, Johan Vlok Louw, Jaco van Schalkwyk en Ingrid Winterbach kuier wanneer dié skrywers by die Fugard Studio voorlees uit hul jongste werke.

And those are just some of the highlights from day one! Check out the complete programme:

Open Book Festival 2014 Programme by Books LIVE

 
 
Books from this year’s Open Book authors:

Naughty KittyThe Other Side of SilenceDevil's HarvestTokoloshe SongProfits of DoomRough MusicTech-Savvy ParentingKwani? 05, Part 2Light on a HillThe Blacks of Cape TownArctic SummerJustice DeniedBetrayal's ShadowSejamolediCobraThe Ghost-Eater and Other StoriesWhite WahalaCould I Vote DA?HoppeThe Chicken ThiefDo Not Go GentleParadiseA Girl Walks into a Blind DateNinevehTransformationsThe FollyThe Alibi ClubHow to Fix South Africa's SchoolsWhoever Fears the SeaShort Story Day Africa: Feast, Famine Invisible OthersAbsent TonguesIf I Could SingRide the TortoiseMemoirs of a Born FreeThe Texture of ShadowsWater MusicHere I AmLost and Found in JohannesburgMbongeni ButheleziGarden of DreamsA Sportful MaliceDog Eat DogTaller than BuildingsSister-SisterThe Zuma YearsSharp EdgesWestern EmpiresThe ThreeInward Moon, Outward SunThe Ugly DucklingDear BulletRaising the BarUnimportanceThis DayReal Meal RevolutionSouth AfricaIn the Heat of ShadowsRachel’s BlueGood Morning, Mr MandelaLondon – Cape Town – Joburg

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Street Fighter Not Tweet Fighter: Ray Hartley Chats to Tony Leon About Opposite Mandela

By Ray Hartley for the Sunday Times

Opposite MandelaOpposite Mandela
Tony Leon (Jonathan Ball Publishers)
****

This book represents another step in Tony Leon’s transformation from party partisan to dignified national eminence.

The first step was captured in his book Accidental Ambassador, about his time as Jacob Zuma’s man in Argentina. For the first time, Leon found himself representing the nation, and not a political party, and it was an adjustment he found surprisingly easy to make. When he returned to the country to launch his book, he had mellowed.

Now he has mellowed some more. Opposite Mandela goes back to the uneasy time he spent as leader of the opposition in a Parliament dominated by a man who had for all intents and purposes been canonized for his role in the transition to democracy.

When I meet Leon in the foyer of the Hyatt Hotel in Rosebank, Johannesburg, he has a ready anecdote to illustrate his new position above the buzz of party politics.

“Lindiwe Mazibuko, Helen Zille and Mmusi Maimane all attended my book launch in Cape Town,” he says. Mazibuko had resigned from the DA to take up a Harvard scholarship amidst talk that she was to be replaced as parliamentary leader by Maimane. Leon apparently offered all sides refuge from a party where the air was thick with intrigue and hurt.

But he can’t resist getting a mild dig in. “I would have just wished Lindiwe well and moved on,” he says of Zille’s decision to address her party caucus with a list of Mazibuko’s weaknesses.

Leon expresses relief that he was a leader “in a pre-Twitter age”, sparing him Zille’s sometimes ill-considered 140-character responses to some or other baiting on the social network.

“I often felt deeply wronged,” he says. But he had senior party leaders who talked him down before he took the fight to the streets (or, in Zille’s case, the tweets).

In Mandela, Leon found his toughest challenge. “He was the fiercest of ANC partisans and I don’t think any organisation came close to eclipsing it. On the other hand, he genuinely had strong democratic impulses. Mandela was a leader. He was quite prepared to go against the grain,” he says.

Leon lists the events that illustrate this: The decision to begin negotiations with the apartheid government; the decision to wear the Springbok jersey at the 1995 World Cup; His reconciliatory response to the Chris Hani assassination; and his decision to abandon nationalization.

It was, he says a different time. “When Mandela was president, the ANC was just starting out in government and not as surefooted as now. There were titans in the world then – Donny Gordon, Harry Oppenheimer, Anton Rupert. The business community was thought to be a very important stakeholder.”

The DA, which then had the reputation as the party with the ear of business, punched above its paltry 1,7 percent of the 1994 vote. It was, he says, “a small party with all the disadvantages of a large party”.

By the time Mandela’s term of office ended, this had all changed and Leon was the de facto leader of the opposition as the National Party began to disintegrate, caught between its role in the government of national unity and its place on the opposition benches.

The result was that Leon found himself courted by Mandela, who kept in close contact and even once offered him a cabinet position. There are few who would have turned down such an offer from the uber statesman, but Leon said no.

Far from breaking his relationship with Mandela, this had the effect of strengthening it. Mandela knew he was tempting Leon to abandon his principles in exchange for the proximity to power and when Leon turned it down, Mandela respected him more for his stance.

Leon and Mandela shared, it turned out, the desire to take the road less travelled. “Maybe constancy is for the dull,” he says.

Follow @hartleyr

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Final Author List for 2014 Open Book Festival

 
The final list for the 2014 Open Book Festival has been released, with international authors Billy Kahora, Geoff Dyer, Mike Carey, Philip Hensher, Raymond E Feist, Sefi Atta, Taiye Selasi, Tony Park, Satoshi Kitamura, Kader Abdolah and Keyi Sheng, as well as Johnny Steinberg and Wilbur Smith, all confirmed to be in Cape Town.

 
This year’s Open Book Festival takes place from 17-21 September at the Fugard Theatre, The Book Lounge, the Homecoming Centre, the District 6 Museum and the Central Library.

The final confirmed complete list is:
Adam Stower, Alison Lowry, Amy Kaye, André P Brink, Andrew Brown, Andrew Salomon, Antony Loewenstein, Ari Sitas, Arthur Goldstuck, Athol Williams, Barbara Boswell, Ben Williams, Bibi Slippers, Billy Kahora, Blaq Pearl, Bronwyn Law-Viljoen, Carol-Ann Davids, Damon Galgut, Dave de Burgh, David Klatzow, David wa Maahlamela, Deon Meyer, Derrick Higginbotham, Diane Awerbuck, Ekow Duker, Eusebius McKaiser, Felicitas Hoppe, Fiona Leonard, Francesca Beard, Futhi Ntshingila, Genna Gardini, Geoff Dyer, Greg Fried, Hakkiesdraad Hartman, Hedley Twidle, Helen Moffett, Henrietta Rose-Innes, Imraan Coovadia, Ivan Vladislavic, Jaco Van Schalkwyk, Jacob Sam-La Rose, Jacqui L’Ange, James Woodhouse, Jesse Breytenbach, Joan Metelerkamp, Joey Hi-Fi, Jolyn Phillips, Jonathan Jansen, Jonny Steinberg, Justin Fox, Kader Abdolah, Karen Jennings, Karina Szczurek, Kelwyn Sole, Keorapetse Willie Kgositsile, Keyi Sheng, Khanyisile Mbongwa, Koleka Putuma, Liesl Jobson, Linda Kaoma, Lwanda Sindaphi, Malaika wa Azania, Mandla Langa, Margie Orford, Marguerite Poland, Marianne Thamm, Marius du Plessis, Mark Gevisser, Mbongeni Nomkonwana, Melissa Siebert, Michele Magwood, Michiel Heyns, Mike Carey, Molly Blank, Nikki Bush, Niq Mhlongo, Oliver Rohe, Olivier Tallec, Philip Hensher, Phillippa Yaa de Villiers, Pieter Odendaal, Rabih Alameddine, Rachel Zadok, Raymond E Feist, Rebecca Davis, Richard Calland, Richard Peirce, Sally Partridge, Sampie Terreblanche, Sarah Lotz, Satoshi Kitamura, Sefi Atta, Shabbir Banoobhai, Simone Hough, Sindiwe Magona, Sixolile Mbalo, Songezo Zibi, Susan Hawthorne , Taiye Selasi, Thando Mgqolozana, Tiah Beautement, Tim Noakes, Toast Coetzer, Toni Stuart, Tony Park, Weaam Williams, Wilbur Smith, Zakes Mda, Zelda la Grange, Zethu Matebeni, Zoliswa Flekisi, Zukiswa Wanner.

Naughty KittyThe Other Side of SilenceDevil's HarvestTokoloshe SongProfits of DoomRough MusicTech-Savvy ParentingKwani? 05, Part 2Light on a HillThe Blacks of Cape TownArctic SummerJustice DeniedBetrayal's ShadowSejamolediCobraThe Ghost-Eater and Other StoriesWhite WahalaCould I Vote DA?HoppeThe Chicken ThiefDo Not Go GentleJeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi
ParadiseA Girl Walks into a Blind DateNinevehTransformationsThe FollyThe Alibi ClubHow to Fix South Africa's SchoolsA Man of Good HopeWhoever Fears the SeaShort Story Day Africa: Feast, Famine Invisible OthersAbsent TonguesIf I Could SingRide the TortoiseMemoirs of a Born FreeThe Texture of ShadowsWater MusicHere I AmThe KeeperLost and Found in JohannesburgMbongeni Buthelezi
Garden of DreamsA Sportful MaliceThe Girl with All the GiftsDog Eat DogTaller than BuildingsSister-SisterMagician's EndThe Zuma YearsSharp EdgesWestern EmpiresThe ThreePot-San's Tabletop TalesA Bit of DifferenceInward Moon, Outward SunThe Ugly Duckling
Dear BulletRaising the BarGhana Must GoUnimportanceThis DayReal Meal RevolutionSouth AfricaIn the Heat of ShadowsDark HeartDesert GodRachel’s BlueGood Morning, Mr MandelaLondon – Cape Town – Joburg

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Maarten Mittner Reviews Kruger, Kommandos & Kak by Chris Ash

Kruger, Kommandos & Kak: Debunking the Myths of the Boer WarVerdict: carrot

Most people will groan: “Oh no, not another book about the Boer War”. But this book shows the final word is far from being spoken. Chris Ash, a Scotsman married to an Afrikaner woman, who says he grew tired of all the drunken Boer victory stories he heard in bars, challenges the conventional view of the war as one of brave Boer underdogs pitted against the mighty British Empire.

Steve Hofmeyr won’t like this book. And predictably, the book has been savaged by Afrikaans critics for being a rehash of Victorian British views discredited over time. But few have responded to Ash’s arguments, instead focusing on perceived factual errors.

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Joshua Maserow Reviews Are South Africans Free? by Lawrence Hamilton

Are South Africans Free?Verdict: carrot

In Are South Africans Free?, political scientist Lawrence Hamilton builds a subversive and nuanced argument concerning the state of the nation. He argues that 20 years after democracy arrived, the majority of South Africans are still waiting for the emancipation promised by the end of apartheid. While there may be a good story to tell, it is not good enough.

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Helen Schoër resenseer The Class of 79 deur Janice Warman

The Class of 79: The story of three fellow students who risked their lives to destroy apartheidUitspraak: wortel

Janice Warman vertel die verhaal van drie Suid-Afrikaners wat as jong mense die moed gehad het om hul oortuiging uit te leef. Apartheid was duidelik verkeerd en hulle is genoop om hulself daarteen te verset.

Toevallig was al drie, soos Warman self, Rhodes-universiteitstudente en sy het hulle geken.

Boek besonderhede


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Winner Announced for the Homebru Books Hamper Competition

Congratulations to Neliswa Hlongwane, who has won five books of her choice from this year’s Exclusive Books Homebru collection.

Clever Blacks, Jesus and NkandlaLost and Found in JohannesburgDear BulletJusticeOliver Tambo Speaks

Neliswa chose Clever Blacks, Jesus and Nkandla: The Real Jacob Zuma in His Own Words by Gareth Van Onselen, Lost and Found in Johannesburg by Mark Gevisser, Dear Bullet: Or A Letter to My Shooter by Sixolile Mbalo, Justice: A Personal Account by Edwin Cameron and Oliver Tambo Speaks edited by Adelaide Tambo.

Congratulations, Neliswa!

If you missed out this time, keep an eye on Books LIVE as we have a number of competitions up our sleeve for the next few weeks.

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Programme Revealed for the 2014 Mail & Guardian Literary Festival (30 – 31 August)

Mail & Guardian Literary Festival

The programme for the fifth annual Mail & Guardian Literary Festival has been revealed.

The event will be dedicated to the memory of Nadine Gordimer, who appeared at the 2012 and 2013 festivals.

The festival will take place from Saturday, 30 August, to Sunday, 31 August, at the Market Theatre in Newtown, Johannesburg. Authors at the festival will include Okwiri Oduor, winner of the 2014 Caine Prize for African writing, Glenn Moss, author of The New Radicals: A generational memoir of the 1970s, Dennis Cruywagen, author of Brothers in War and Peace, which focuses on the lives of identical twins Abraham and Constand Viljoen, as well as Ingrid Winterbach, Perfect Hlongwane and Karabo Kgoleng.

Feast, Famine and PotluckThe New RadicalsBrothers in War and PeaceThe Road of ExcessJozi

This year’s Mail & Guardian Literary Festival will kick off with a jazz concert at The Orbit on Friday evening (August 29) and the closing event will be a “meet the authors” cocktail party at David Krut Bookstore on Sunday.

In her speech accepting the Nobel prize for literature in 1991, Gordimer noted: “Being here: in a particular time and place. That is the existential position with particular implications for literature.”

The panels and the themes at the festival will draw on that notion, as well as being inspired by Gordimer’s short fiction, her non-fiction essays and her many campaigning causes for freedom of thought, speech and expression.

The festival’s special guest is Okwiri Oduor, the winner of the 2014 Caine prize for African writing, who will take part in sessions on Gordimer and on the short story.

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Image courtesy of Redballoon


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Pallo Jordan Resignation Round-up (Plus: Jordan’s Books)

ANC veteran and former Minister of Arts and Culture Pallo Jordan resigned from the party yesterday, following the Sunday Times report exposing his false academic qualifications.

Jordan has gone by the title “doctor” for many years, but did not receive a PhD from either of the academic institutions he studied at overseas; the University of Wisconsin in the United States or the London School of Economics. Additionally, the Sunday Times could find no evidence of Jordan being awarded an honorary doctorate.

Jordan is the editor of Oliver Tambo Remembered: A Collection of Contributions from Around the World Celebrating the Life of OR Tambo, and contributed to London Recruits: The Secret War against Apartheid and Time to Tell.

Oliver Tambo RememberedLondon RecruitsTime to Tell

In light of the expose on 3 August, Jordan disappeared from the public eye, despite a number of prominent South Africans coming out in support of him, including Professor Steven Friedman, TO Molefe and Professor Mary Metcalfe.

ANC Chief Whip in Parliament Stone Sizani defended Jordan in an official statement, calling him a “source of pride” for the party.

“He is one of the movement’s greatest products, a public intellectual par excellence and a consummate historian,” Sizani said in a statement.

“While academic achievements are important, they can never truly define one’s wisdom, intelligence or intellectual depth.”

ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe told the Mail & Guardian yesterday that Jordan has owned up to his deceit in a letter to the ANC’s leadership, providing a “detailed explanation” and offering to “resign his membership of Parliament, the National Executive Committee of the ANC and the ANC”:

“A man of Comrade Pallo Jordan’s intellect does not need to perpetuate deceit, he must be given time to deal with his guilt,” Mantashe said. “As the ANC, we have accepted his public apology. To apologise was not an action of the faint hearted”.

Mantashe cautioned that while Jordan voluntarily took responsibility for the false qualifications, he should not be “destroyed”.

Book details

  • Oliver Tambo Remembered: A Collection of Contributions from Around the World Celebrating the Life of OR Tambo edited by Zweledinga Pallo Jordan
    EAN: 9781770102361
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

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Joshua Maserow Reviews Are South Africans Free? by Lawrence Hamilton

Are South Africans Free?Verdict: carrot

In Are South Africans Free?, political scientist Lawrence Hamilton builds a subversive and nuanced argument concerning the state of the nation. He argues that 20 years after democracy arrived, the majority of South Africans are still waiting for the emancipation promised by the end of apartheid. While there may be a good story to tell, it is not good enough.

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