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Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

The 2016 Sunday Times Alan Paton Award longlist

Published in the Sunday Times

The 2016 Sunday Times Literary Awards longlists

 
Alert! The longlist for the 2016 Sunday Times Alan Paton Award for non-fiction has been announced, in association with Porcupine Ridge.

This is the 27th year the Alan Paton Award will be bestowed on a book that presents “the illumination of truthfulness, especially those forms of it that are new, delicate, unfashionable and fly in the face of power”, and that demonstrates “compassion, elegance of writing, and intellectual and moral integrity”.

This year’s Alan Paton Award judging panel is Achmat Dangor (chair), Tinyiko Maluleke and Pippa Green.

 

Chairperson Achmat Dangor’s remarks on the Alan Paton Award longlist:

The 2016 Alan Paton Awards longlisted books examine topics that cover almost the whole spectrum of macro subjects – culture, race, politics, economics – that impact on South Africa today.

There are personal stories about very high-profile figures as well as ordinary people such as street kids and women sangomas in patriarchal rural environments, all of whom deal with the challenging realities of their lives in different ways. Questions are asked: what is race and racism; how is inequality defined; is a true democracy solely embedded in its political order; and how can the constitution be made to work for the true liberation of all citizens.

The books selected for consideration are those that are honest, do not hesitate to challenge power and convention, and are engaging enough to reach a broad general readership.

Finally, whatever the writer has to say, his or her book will achieve enduring impact because of how well he or she can write.

Last year’s Alan Paton Award winner was Jacob Dlamini for his book Askari: A Story of Collaboration and Betrayal in the Anti-Apartheid Struggle (Jacana Media). Damon Galgut was awarded the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize for his novel, Arctic Summer (Umuzi).

The shortlists will be announced on Saturday, May 14 at the Franschhoek Literary Festival. The winners of the 2016 Alan Paton Award and Barry Ronge Fiction Prize will each receive R100 000.

 
2016 Alan Paton Award longlist

Empire, War & Cricket in South AfricaEmpire, War & Cricket in South Africa by Dean Allen
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EAN: 9781770228474
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JM Coetzee and the Life of WritingJM Coetzee and the Life of Writing by David Attwell
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EAN: 9781431421534
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DemocracyDemocracy: More Than Just Elections by Brigalia Bam
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EAN: 9780992232931
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The Secret SocietyThe Secret Society: Cecil John Rhodes’s Plan for a New World Order by Robin Brown
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EAN: 9781770229204
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The Black SashThe Black Sash: Women for Justice and Peace by Mary Ingouville Burton
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EAN: 9781431422289
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PapwaPapwa: Golf’s Lost Legend by Maxine Case
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EAN: 9780795707117
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BirthmarkBirthmark by Stephen Clingman
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EAN: 9781431421459
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The Pavement BookwormThe Pavement Bookworm by Philani Dladla
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EAN: 9781928337003
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To Quote MyselfTo Quote Myself by Khaya Dlanga
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EAN: 9781770104716
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RapeRape: A South African Nightmare by Pumla Dineo Gqola
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EAN: 9781920601522
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What If There Were No Whites In South Africa?What If There Were No Whites In South Africa? by Ferial Haffajee
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EAN: 9781770104402
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Operation Lock and the War on Rhino PoachingOperation Lock and the War on Rhino Poaching by John Hanks
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EAN: 9781770227293
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In Enemy HandsIn Enemy Hands: South Africa’s POWs in World War II by Karen Horn
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EAN: 9781868426515
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Eugene de KockEugene de Kock: Assassin for the State by Anemari Jansen
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EAN: 9780624070276
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Leading for ChangeLeading for Change by Jonathan Jansen
EAN: 9781138890268
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How Long Will South Africa Survive?How Long Will South Africa Survive?: The Looming Crisis by RW Johnson
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We Have Now Begun Our DescentWe Have Now Begun Our Descent: How To Stop South Africa Losing Its Way by Justice Malala
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EAN: 9781868426799
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Capitalist CrusaderCapitalist Crusader: Fighting Poverty Through Economic Growth by Herman Mashaba
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EAN: 9781928257059
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God, Spies and LiesGod, Spies and Lies: Finding South Africa’s Future Through its Past by John Matisonn
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EAN: 9780994670236
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Run Racist RunRun Racist Run: Journeys Into The Heart Of Racism by Eusebius McKaiser
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EAN: 9781928257158
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The Rainy SeasonThe Rainy Season: Three Lives in the New South Africa by Maggie Messitt
EAN: 9781609383275
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Deliberate ConcealmentDeliberate Concealment: An Insider’s Account of Cricket South Africa and the IPL Bonus Saga by Mtutuzeli Nyoka
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EAN: 9781770104297
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A Perfect StormA Perfect Storm: Antisemitism in South Africa 1930 – 1948 by Milton Shain
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Jan SmutsJan Smuts: Unafraid of Greatness by Richard Steyn
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Showdown at the Red LionShowdown at the Red Lion: The Life and Times of Jack McLoughlin, 1859–1910 by Charles van Onselen
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EAN: 9781868426225
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Ahmed Kathrada calls for President Jacob Zuma to resign

Ahmed Kathrada, former political prisoner and anti-apartheid activist, author and living political legend, has written an open letter to President Jacob Zuma.

In the letter, Kathrada describes himself as a “loyal and disciplined member of the ANC and broader Congress movement since the 1940s”, loathe to speak out publicly “about any differences I may harbour against my leaders and my organisation, the ANC”.

However, Kathrada adds: “Today I have decided to break with that tradition.”

The final words of the letter are: “Today I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign.”

Read the letter in full:

Dear Comrade President Zuma

I have agonised for a while before writing this letter to you.

I am just a rank-and-file member of my ANC Branch. However, even before the ANC opened its membership to non-Africans in the 1969. I was involved in the activities of the ANC, the South African Indian Congress, the SACP and Umkhonto we Sizwe.

-In the Defiance Campaign Trial of 1952, I was among the 20 accused who were sentenced to 9 months imprisonment, suspended for 2 years.

-In the Treason Trial- 1956-1961. Of the original 156 accused, I was among the last 30 who were finally acquitted in 1961.

-In the 1963-1964 Rivonia Trial I was among the 8 accused sentenced to Life Imprisonment. Together with Comrade Walter Sisulu and others I was released in 1989. Comrade Madiba was released about 4 months later.

I am immensely grateful to the ANC for the privilege of serving on the first NEC after its unbanning. In 1997, I stepped down. I also benefited from the experience of serving for one term as Parliamentary Counsellor to President Mandela, after which I stepped down.

I am of course aware that this does not automatically bestow on me the right to address this letter to the President.

However, in all these years it never occurred to me that the time would come when I would feel obliged to express my concerns to the Honourable President. It is, therefore, painful for me to write this letter to you. I have been a loyal and disciplined member of the ANC and broader Congress movement since the 1940s.

I have always maintained a position of not speaking out publicly about any differences I may harbour against my leaders and my organisation, the ANC. I would only have done so when I thought that some important organisational matters compel me to raise my concerns.

Today I have decided to break with that tradition.

The position of President is one that must at all times unite this country behind a vision and programme that seeks to make tomorrow a better day than today for all South Africans. It is a position that requires the respect of all South Africans, which of course must be earned at all times.

I did not speak out against Nkandla although I thought it wrong to have spent public money for any President’s private comfort. I did not speak out though I felt it grossly insulting when my President is called a “thief” or a “rapist”; or when he is accused of being “under the influence of the Guptas”. I believed that the NEC would have dealt with this as the collective leadership of the ANC.

When I learnt of the dismissal of Minister Nene and the speculated reasons for this I became very worried. I’m fully aware, it is accepted practice that the appointment and dismissal of Ministers is the prerogative of the President. This might be technically correct but in my view it is against the best traditions of our movement. My concern was amplified when it emerged that the Deputy Finance Minister reported that he was offered the Finance Minister post by members of the Gupta family. The people’s interest must at all times remain supreme.In this instance it was clearly not the case. The resultant crisis that the country was plunged into was clearly an indication that the removal of the Minister was not about the interests of the people.

The unanimous ruling of the Constitutional Court on the Nkandla matter has placed me in an introspective mode and I had to ask myself some very serious and difficult questions. Now that the court has found that the President failed to uphold, defend and respect the Constitution as the supreme law, how should I relate to my President?

If we are to continue to be guided by growing public opinion and the need to do the right thing, would he not seriously consider stepping down?

I am not a political analyst, but I am now driven to ask: “Dear Comrade President, don’t you think your continued stay as President will only serve to deepen the crisis of confidence in the government of the country?”

And bluntly, if not arrogantly; in the face of such persistently widespread criticism, condemnation and demand, is it asking too much to express the hope that you will choose the correct way that is gaining momentum, to consider stepping down?

If not, Comrade President, are you aware that your outstanding contribution to the liberation struggle stands to be severely tarnished if the remainder of your term as President continues to be dogged by crises and a growing public loss of confidence in the ANC and government as a whole.

I know that if I were in the President’s shoes, I would step down with immediate effect. I believe that is what would help the country to find its way out of a path that it never imagined it would be on, but one that it must move out of soon.

To paraphrase the famous MK slogan of the time, “There comes a time in the life of every nation when it must chose to submit or fight”. Today I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign.

Yours comradely

Ahmed M Kathrada – 31st March, 2016

Related news:

 

Selected books by Ahmed Kathrada:

MandelaA Simple FreedomNo Bread for MandelaMemoirsA Free Mind

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Jacket Notes: Thula Simpson on his book Umkhonto we Sizwe: The ANC’s Armed Struggle

Published in the Sunday Times

Umkhonto we Sizwe•Umkhonto we Sizwe: The ANC’s Armed Struggle
Thula Simpson (Penguin Random House)

In the manifesto issued on December 16, 1961 in which Umkhonto we Sizwe announced its existence, there was a passage that read: “We hope that we will bring the government and its supporters to their senses before it is too late, so that both the government and its policies can be changed before matters reach the desperate state of civil war.”

I was struck by those words when I first read them. This counterintuitive notion (to me at least) of an armed insurgency that aimed in part to avoid civil war was what first kindled my interest in studying MK’s history.

My research has involved events extending over almost half a century, in which MK operations encompassed practically the whole spectrum of modern warfare: counter-insurgency campaigns in Angola that aimed to hold territory against Unita’s guerrilla incursions; mobile warfare in Zimbabwe in what Ron Reid-Daly, the commander of Rhodesia’s Selous Scouts, once called “the most significant operations” of that war; acts of sabotage that made headlines across the world; and other operations designed to strike fear into the hearts of the supporters of the apartheid regime.

My main sources were the recollections of those who participated in the events. The more I read of their accounts, the more I developed an interest in them for their own sake. It is usually easy to offer judgment in hindsight, but I found it remarkable how seldom this was the case in my reading. On many occasions it was difficult to say, even knowing the outcomes, how one would have acted differently, so acute were the dilemmas faced by the actors involved.

Perhaps the principal novelty of the book is the way I have tried to preserve a sense of these dilemmas. The book is written in the immediate tense, conveying some of the real-time choices faced by the protagonists. The narrative weaves the perspectives of all sides – insurgents, counter-insurgents and civilians – into a unified account of South Africa’s progression from the height of apartheid in the 1950s to the negotiated settlement of the 1990s.

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Jacob Dlamini and Imraan Coovadia among the winners at the inaugural NIHSS Book, Creative and Digital Awards

Jacob Dlamini and Imraan Coovadia among the winners at the inaugural NIHSS Book, Creative and Digital Awards

 

Alert! The inaugural National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) Book, Creative and Digital Awards ceremony took place last night in Parktown, Johannesburg.

Winners included Jacob Dlamini for Askari (Jacana Media); Imraan Coovadia for Tales of the Metric System (Umuzi); the 2014 Short Sharp Stories Award anthology Adults Only, edited by Joanne Hichens; and recent UKZN Press publication Class in Soweto.

AskariTales of the Metric SystemAdults OnlyClass in Soweto

 

Awards were also handed out in the categories Digital Humanities and Creative Collections. Each award is valued at R60,000.

Submissions for the awards were open to academics from the humanities and social sciences, as well as creative curators and artists based at South African universities, in any of South Africa’s official languages.

The NIHSS is funded by the Department of Higher Education and Training.

From the NIHSS:

The awards will honour and celebrate outstanding, innovative and socially responsive scholarship, creative and digital contributions that advance in the humanities and social sciences fields. The awards are consequently a platforms to laud outstanding contributions to the humanities and social sciences through scholarly and creative work.

Through its core functions of enhancing and coordinating scholarship, research and ethical practice in humanities and social sciences, the NIHSS seeks to redress existing deficits and also coordinates programmes, projects, collaboration and activities in the humanities and social sciences disciplines through existing public universities.

Ashraf Garda was the master of ceremonies, and the keynote address was given by Minister of Higher Education and Training Blade Nzimande.

Jacob Dlamini and Imraan Coovadia among the winners at the inaugural NIHSS Book, Creative and Digital AwardsNzimande expressed his delight at the overwhelming response and high standard of entries that the awards received from academics and other practitioners in the field.

“A renewed focus on the importance of the humanities and social sciences is absolutely critical in a world that increasingly values the Sciences, Engineering, Technology and Mathematics (STEM) as the only measure of development and progress,” Nzimande said.

“The role of the humanities and social sciences must not only assist us in analysing and interpreting the world we live in, but it must enable us to change the material conditions and lived experiences of those most marginalised and alienated in society.”

The judges summations were given by Joyce Myeza (Digital Humanities), Thembinkosi Goniwe (Creative Collections), Shireen Hassim (Books: Non-fiction), and Pumla Dineo Gqola (Books: Fiction)

Winners: Books

Winner Best Non-fiction Monograph:

Jacob Dlamini for Askari

(Shortlisted: Isabel Hofmeyr for Gandhi’s Printing Press: Experiments in Slow Reading, Stephanus Muller for Nagmusiek, Corrine Sandwith for A World of Letters: Reading Communities and Cultural Debates in Early Apartheid South Africa)

Winner Best Non-fiction Edited Volume:

Class in Soweto, edited by Peter Alexander, Claire Ceruti, Keke Motseke, Mosa Phadi and Kim Wale

(Shortlisted: Peter Delius, Laura Phillips and Fiona Rankin-Smith for A Long Way Home: Migrant Worker Worlds 1800-2014, Salim Vally and Enver Motala for Education, Economy and Society)

Winner Best Single Authored Fiction (novel, short stories, poetry, drama):

Imraan Coovadia for Tales of the Metric System

(Shortlisted: Antjie Krog for Mede-wete, Bishop Makobe for Tsa Ngweding wa Letopanta)

Winner Edited Fiction Volume:

Adults Only, edited by Joanne Hichens

(Shortlisted: Amitabh Mitra and Naomi Nkealah for Splinters of a Mirage Dawn: An Anthology of Migrant Poetry from South Africa)

Winners: Digital Humanities

Best Digital Humanities Tool or Suite of Tools:

Nirma Madhoo-Chipps for Future Body: Technological Embodiment in Digital Fashion Media

Best Digital Humanities Project for Community Engagement:

Shirley Walters and Astrid von Kotze for Popular Education

Creative Collections

Best Public Performance:

Jay Pather for Live Art Festival

Best Musical Composition/Arrangement:

Sazi Dlamini, Neo Muyanga, Sumangala Damodaran, Ari Sitas (produced by Jürgen Bräuninger) for Insurrections

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Watch a video from the event:

YouTube Preview Image
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View some tweets from the event:

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Inaugural Jewish Literary Festival to take place in Cape Town in May

Jewish Literary Festival

 

There’s a new book event on South Africa’s calendar: The Jewish Literary Festival.

The new festival will take place in Cape Town on Sunday, 22 May at the Gardens Community Centre, and many well-known authors have signed up.

Letters of StoneHome RemediesSister-SisterBanquet at BrabazanThe Disruptors
Continental ShiftThe Crazy Life of Larry JoeTribeUs and ThemThe Rag RaceParadise
Opposite MandelaGod, Spies and LiesWorld Atlas of FoodThe Supper Club

 
Book fans can expect to see Steven Robins, Diane Awerbuck, Rachel Zadok, Patricia Schonstein, Gus Silber, Kevin Bloom, Joanne Jowell, Rahla Xenopoulos, Rosemund Handler, Adam Mendelsohn, Raymond Joseph, Greg Lazarus, Tony Leon, John Matisonn, Jenny Morris and Phillippa Cheifitz at the inaugural festival.

Nancy Richards and Marianne Thamm will moderate the events.

Read more:

Press release:

Jewish Literary Festival makes its debut

The Western Cape is fast becoming the Book Festival province. Hard on the heels of the Franschhoek Literary Festival comes the first Jewish Literary Festival (JLF) on Sunday 22 May, offering a jam-packed day of fascinating events to anyone who loves books, Jewish literature, culture and conversation.

The JLF will showcase authors, poets, illustrators, journalists, writers and educators who have a Jewish connection or are engaged with subjects of Jewish interest. The venue is the Gardens Community Centre in Cape Town, home to the acclaimed Jacob Gitlin Library which is partnering the festival and in association with the Cape Jewish Chronicle.

From 09h00 to 17h00 the various sites comprising the centre will hum with panel discussions, launches, readings, debates, presentations and book-style activities. More than 24 events will cover a variety of genres such as fiction, food, memoir, politics, academia, scriptwriting, journalism, and the arts.

Award-winning and well known authors have already committed to being part of the JLF – so look forward to meeting writers such as Steven Robins, Diane Awerbuck, Rachel Zadok, Patricia Schonstein, Gus Silber, Kevin Bloom, Joanne Jowell, Rahla Xenopoulos, Rosemund Handler, Adam Mendelsohn, Raymond Joseph, Greg Lazarus, Tony Leon, John Matisonn, Jenny Morris and Phillippa Cheifitz. The festival promises to be a cornucopia of writers and their works and more writers will be announced as they come on board. Moderators such as Nancy Richards and Marianne Thamm will bring their expertise and connections into the mix.

A full children’s programme is on offer for all ages. Authors, teachers, entertainers and carers will keep the young ones occupied all day with storytelling, workshopping and creative activities. Of course, with food being an important part of Jewish culture, delicious lunches will be served at Café Riteve and coffee bars will be open throughout the day for that brief pause between sessions.

The programme has been designed to appeal to all ages and cover a range of genres. It aims to promote constructive dialogue and discussion in the true spirit of Jewish life without promoting any single political or religious agenda. All of this book talk offers the opportunity to meet an assortment of wordsmiths, make new friends, engage with ideas and pick up some great reads.

The Jewish Literary Festival – for lovers of literature and Jewish Life.

Date: Sunday 22 May

Venue: Gardens Community Centre, Hatfield Street.

Time: 09h00 to 17h00

Enquiries: gitlib@netactive.co.za or info@jewishliteraryfestival.co.za or visit www.jewishliteraryfestival.co.za

Booking through Quicket.

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12 writers from 6 African countries converge in Zambia for the Caine Prize Workshop

Caine Prize Workshop
The Ghost RunnerLusaka Punk and Other StoriesWe Need New NamesRemember the African Skies
A Memory This Size and Other StoriesBorn on a TuesdayThe True Story of David Munyakei, Goldenberg WhistleblowerThe ReactiveThe Gonjon Pin and Other Stories

 

12 writers from six African countries have converged at the Chaminuka Lodge near Lusaka, Zambia, where they will spend 13 days (18 March-29 March) to writ­­e, read and discuss work in progress and to learn from award-winning author Jamal Mahjoub, the writer also known as Parker Bilal, and Ellah Wakatama Allfrey OBE, Caine Prize Deputy Chairperson, literary critic, editor and broadcaster.

This year’s participants include 2015 Caine Prize winner Namwali Serpell (Zambia), as well as 2011 winner NoViolet Bulawayo (Zimbabwe); Chilufya Chilangwa (Zambia); 2013 winner Tope Folarin (Nigeria); 2013 and 2015 shortlistee Elnathan John (Nigeria); 2012 and 2014 shortlistee Billy Kahora (Kenya); Bwanga Kapumpa (Zambia); 2015 shortlistee FT Kola (South Africa); Kafula Mwila (Zambia); 2015 shortlistee Masande Ntshanga (South Africa); Timwa Lipenga (Malawi); and 2014 winner Okwiri Oduor (Kenya).

Mahjoub, who along with Ellah Allfrey will facilitate the workshop this year, said: “The annual workshop allows writers a unique chance to develop their work and to see themselves as part of a literary community. It is always exciting to meet new writers and to help them realise their potential. The workshop is, in my view, one of the most important aspects of the Caine Prize.”

During the workshop, the writers will be expected to write a short story for the 2016 Caine Prize anthology, which will be published in the UK by New Internationalist in the summer, and subsequently by a network of co-publishers. Alongside Interlink in the USA, eight African publishers receive a print-ready PDF to print in their country, they include: Jacana Media (South Africa), Lantern Books (Nigeria), Kwani? (Kenya), Sub-Saharan Publishers (Ghana), FEMRITE (Uganda), Gadsden Publishers (Zambia), amaBooks (Zimbabwe) and Langaa (Cameroon).

The workshop will incorporate a visit to local schools and a public event.

Kapumpa, Ntshanga and John have been tweeting from the workshop:

Caine Prize director Lizzy Attree said: “As Namwali Serpell won the 2015 Caine Prize we are pleased to bring the workshop, for the first time, to her home in Zambia. We are also very pleased to be supported by Carnegie Corporation of New York.”

Jonathan Taylor, Chair of the Caine Prize Council, added: “We are hugely grateful for the support of Carnegie Corporation of New York for this important workshop in Zambia, which is likely again to be the launch pad for many successful literary careers.”

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Book Bites: 6 March 2016

BlackassBlackass
A Igoni Barrett (Chatto & Windus)
Book Buff
***
This is Barrett’s debut novel, following a short story collection that earned high praise from Teju Cole and Nadine Gordimer. Its premise is intriguing and unashamedly Kafkaesque: a young Lagos man wakes up to discover he is a red-haired white person. Unlike Gregor Samsa, and perhaps in one of the book’s failings, Furo Wariboko does not stick around to find out his family’s reaction. He flees, and the narrative traces the benefits and pitfalls of his transformation. But what begins as an absurdist plot device turns into a rather messy collision of politics and character. – Jennifer Malec @projectjennifer

Carrying Albert HomeCarrying Albert Home
Homer Hickam (HarperCollins)
Book Fling
***
Fans of Forrest Gump will be delighted by Hickam’s latest work, based on tall tales his parents told him. Albert-the-alligator is getting too big for the home of 1930s coal miner Homer and his wife, Elsie. She agrees to release Albert into the wild, but only if they drive thousands of miles to Orlando, Florida, home of Elsie’s happiest memories. The three of them set off on a roadtrip of a lifetime. Along the way they have numerous adventures, which include bank robbers, revolutionaries, bootleggers and meeting noted writers Steinbeck and Hemingway. This is a charming love story about finding the good in what you already have. – Tiah Beautement @ms_tiahmarie

A Taste of Bitter AlmondsA Taste of Bitter Almonds: Perdition and Promise in South Africa
Michael Schmidt (Best Red)
Book Buff
****
Journalism is supposed to speak truth to power, which Schmidt does fearlessly (and sometimes personally) in this collection of stories gathered over the course of his long career. A compendium of forgotten histories across all cultures and creeds, as well as a look at some of the stories that threatened to tear South Africa apart, this is a fascinating, if difficult, look at our shared and complex history. – Zoe Hinis @ZoeHinis

The Missing and the DeadThe Missing and the Dead
Stuart MacBride (HarperCollins)
Book Thrill
To find Detective Inspector Logan McRae in uniform doing divisional policing in the wilds of rural Aberdeenshire rather than in his native Aberdeen is quite a change. On the upside, he has escaped from DCI Roberta Steel, his potty-mouthed impossible boss. When the body of a young girl is found, Logan has to investigate a murder – this time hindered more than helped by the investigating team from Aberdeen, headed by the brilliant but invariably infuriating Inspector Steel. Exciting, often hilarious and occasionally romantic, this is another first-class thriller from the talented MacBride. – Aubrey Paton

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Julius Malema’s controversial SONA Debate speech referred to parliamentary rules committee (Plus: Watch the video)

The Coming RevolutionStill an Inconvenient YouthThe World According to Julius Malema

 

Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) leader Julius Malema’s speech in the State of the Nation debate will be referred to Parliament’s rules committee to consider‚ speaker Baleka Mbete has said.

Watch the speech here:

YouTube Preview Image

 

On Tuesday‚ Mbete ruled that the speech be expunged saying that its content should have been brought as a substantive motion.

The move to expunge it from the Hansard – the Parliamentary transcript – was questioned by Cope’s Deidre Carter who wanted to know which rule Mbete was referencing when she made the order.

Before proceedings in the second day of debates started today‚ Mbete said that while the Constitution guaranteed members of parliament freedom of speech‚ these rights should not infringe on other people’s rights.

“The presiding officers are the guardians of the rights and privileges of members‚” Mbete said.

She referenced a ruling in the fourth parliament that said that said that members should avoid the use of “offensive and unbecoming language”.

She said Malema’s speech had cast aspersions on characters‚ and had referenced “private and personal” matters relating to the president.

Mbete said it was up to the presiding officers to ensure that “no scandalous or improper matter” appeared on printed paper.

But she said‚ the matter required “serious consideration” and as such‚ she would refer it to the rules committee to engage with.

She said the EFF‚ who are not present in the house‚ had written to her today asking that she withdraw her statement that Malema’s remarks be expunged.

She said her ruling covered this request also.

TMG Digital/TMG Parliamentary Bureau

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Claire Constant reviews Israel and South Africa: The Many Faces of Apartheid by Ilan Pappe

Israel and South Africa: The Many Faces of ApartheidVerdict: carrot

Israel and South Africa: The Many Faces of Apartheid could well become essential reading for anyone interested in the intrinsic nature of the Israeli state’s colonial and segregationist system, as well as the lessons to be drawn from a comparison of the Israeli and South African contexts. The authors argue for the need to explicitly call Israel an apartheid state, and demonstrate how much there is to learn from the successful fight against apartheid in South Africa. In such a heated political and academic debate, this book is a welcome contribution: one which will surely bring about important animated discussions, including with regards to the possibilities of a single-state solution.

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The local non-fiction to look forward to in 2016 (Jan – June)

The local non-fiction books to look forward to in 2016 (Jan - June)

 

Books LIVE is proud to present the list of non-fiction books to look out for in the first half of 2016.

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Three eagerly anticipated books that will make an appearance this year are Kevin Bloom and Richard Poplak’s magnum opus on Africa, Continental Shift, Alex Eliseev’s examination of the Betty Ketani murder investigation, Cold Case Confession, and Don Pinnock’s City Press Non-fiction Award-winning book, Gang Town.

Patrick Craven’s The Battle for Cosatu: An Insider’s View and The Big Fix by Ray Hartley are sure to make a splash.

Letters of Stone: Discovering A Family’s History In Nazi Germany by Capetonian Steven Robins is already receiving some very favourable reviews, with Antjie Krog calling it “a most exceptional and unforgettable book”.

Finally, William Dicey, the author of the critically acclaimed Borderline (2004), has a new book of essays out titled Mongrel, which comes highly recommended by Ivan Vladislavić.

Looking ahead towards the second half of the year, Jessica Pitchford’s Switched At Birth – the true story of the boys who were accidentally swapped at an East Rand hospital in 2010 – is out in July, and is sure to capture the imagination. In November, Trevor Noah’s collection of essays will be published, while the long-awaited sequel to Nelson Mandela’s Long Walk to Freedom is expected in November or December.

If you think we’ve left something out, feel free to let us know in the comments below, or on Facebook or Twitter.

Ed’s note: We usually make a point of not using the word ‘local’ to refer South African books, but include it the title of this bi-annual list simply to differentiate it from the many international lists that pop up at this time of year.

Without further ado, have a look at our list:

Note: Covers are subject to change, and information was provided by the publishers

JANUARY

RelocationsRelocations: Reading Culture in South Africa edited by Cóilín Parsons, Imraan Coovadia and Alexandra Dodd
UCT Press

Relocations brings together a selection of the Gordon Institute for the Performing and Creative Arts Great Texts/Big Questions public lecture series by world-renowned artists, writers and thinkers

The authors range from novelists André Brink and Imraan Coovadia (one of the collection’s editors), to poets Gabeba Baderoon and Rustum Kozain, to artist William Kentridge and social activist Zackie Achmat. The topics are as wide as Don Quixote, Marx and Lincoln, trout fishing, Hamlet, the 19th-century Russian writer Gogol and Nabokov’s novel Lolita.

More about the book

The Compassionate EnglishwomanThe Compassionate Englishwoman: Emily Hobhouse in the Boer War by Robert Eales
UCT Press

In 1899 the South African War broke out. As the war progressed, in London the upper-class Emily Hobhouse learned of the camps in southern Africa that contained mostly Boer women and children who had been displaced by the hostilities. She was so concerned that she decided to go to South Africa to investigate. By herself and on her own initiative, she travelled by ship to Cape Town, to begin the distribution of aid to these camps.

More about the book

Letters of StoneLetters of Stone by Steven Robins
Penguin Random House South Africa

“This is a most exceptional and unforgettable book” – Antjie Krog

Letters of Stone tracks Robins’s journey of discovery about the lives and fates of the Robinski family, in southern Africa, Berlin, Riga and Auschwitz. It also explores the worldwide rise of eugenics and racial science before the war, which justified the murder of Jews by the Nazis and caused South Africa and other countries to close their doors to Jewish refugees.

Most of all, this book is a poignant reconstruction of a family trapped in an increasingly terrifying and deadly Nazi state, and of the immense pressure on Robins’ father in faraway South Africa, which forced him to retreat into silence.

More about the book

Continental ShiftContinental Shift by Kevin Bloom and Richard Poplak
Jonathan Ball

Africa is falling. Africa is succeeding. Africa is betraying its citizens. Africa is a place of starvation, corruption, disease. African economies are soaring faster than any on earth. Africa is squandering its bountiful resources. Africa is a roadmap for global development. Africa is turbulent. Africa is stabilising. Africa is doomed. Africa is the future.

All of these pronouncements prove equally true and false, as South African journalists Richard Poplak and Kevin Bloom discover on their nine-year road trip through the paradoxical continent they call home.

How to Invest Like Warren BuffettHow to Invest Like Warren Buffett by Alec Hogg
Jonathan Ball

This is the South African guide on investing like Warren Buffett by award-winning financial publisher Alec Hogg.

Learn how the investment genius of Buffett can be applied to South African investing. This book is packed with invaluable lessons and insights from the world’s greatest wealth creator.

Useful charts and graphics are included in the book to provide more details about concepts and shares.

FEBRUARY

nullTouched by Biko by Andile M-Afrika
Unisa Press

This is a political memoir of life in a rural South African township – with Andile M-Afrika weaving a lyrical tale from actual events surrounding this country’s struggle history, where Steve Bantu Biko played a pivotal role.

M-Afrika’s engaging narrative delves deep into his personal encounters with people, political events and day-to-day life in rural King Williams Town, Eastern Cape. What speaks volumes, are the pervasive echoes of Biko’s presence, on those who shared life in this historic village.

Written with a unique vibrancy and fine wit to enthrall readers from all walks of life, Touched by Biko will be enjoyed by all with an interest in the South African struggle history.

Murder at Small KoppieMurder at Small Koppie by Greg Marinovich
Penguin Random House South Africa

Renowned photojournalist Greg Marinovich explores the truth behind the Marikana massacre, looking specifically at the largely untold slaughter at Small Koppie.

Drawing on his own meticulous investigations, eyewitness accounts and the findings of the Marikana Commission of Inquiry set up by President Jacob Zuma following the massacre, Marinovich accurately reconstructs that fateful day as well as the events leading up to the strike.

This is the definitive account of the Marikana massacre from the journalist whose award-winning investigation into the tragedy was called the most important piece of South African journalism post-apartheid.

More about the book

nullThe New Black Middle Class in South Africa by Roger Southall
Jacana Media

Despite the fact that the “rise of the black middle class” is one of the most visible aspects of post-apartheid society and a major actor in the reshaping of South African society, analysis of it has been lacking. Rather, the image presented by the media has been of “black diamonds” and corrupt “tenderpreneurs”.

This book presents a new way of looking at the black middle class which seeks to complicate that picture, an analysis that reveals its impactful role in the recent history of South Africa.

nullThe Struggle Continues: 50 Years of Tyranny in Zimbabwe by David Coltart
Jacana Media

The memoir of David Coltart, one of the most prominent political and human rights figures in Zimbabwe. Over the years, Coltart has been threatened, detained, spuriously prosecuted and has survived several direct attempts on his life.

As a young man, Coltart was urged by Robert Mugabe to return to Zimbabwe from South Africa, but he would become one of Mugabe’s favourite targets of vilification, branded a traitor to the state and worthy of remaining in the country only as a resident of one of its prisons.

Simply DeliciousSimply Delicious by Zola Nene

In Nene’s own words: “Food has always been a huge part of my life; important occasions were always marked with a feast of some sort …”

That’s exactly what Simply Delicious is all about; it’s Nene’s culinary career told through her recipes, interspersed with snippets and perspectives of her life journey, including tributes to the people who have inspired and influenced her cooking style and explaining the reason for certain culinary choices that she has made.

Nene is currently the resident chef on Expresso Morning Show.

More about the book

nullThe Dot Spot:A Journey into Sex and Love by Dorothy Black
Jacana Media

The Dot Spot will be South Africa’s first, fun and frank “how-to” guide on untangling the mysteries of sex, love and relationships.

Written in an upfront, entertaining and sassy style, the book uncovers everything you’ve ever wanted to know about dating and relationships, from kink to sexual self-empowerment.

All of us want to find the similarities and connections in the secrets, fantasies and desires that we have but are often too shy to talk about. This book will spark that conversation with unbridled candour.

nullDorothea Bleek: A Life of Scholarship by Jill Weintroub
Wits University Press

Dorothea Bleek (1873 to 1948) devoted her life to completing the “bushman researches” her father and aunt had begun in the closing decades of the 19th century.

How has history treated Dorothea Bleek? Has she been recognised as a scholar in her own right? Was she an adventurer, or was she conservative, a researcher who belittled the people she studied? These are some of the questions with which Jill Weintroub starts this thoughtful biography.

Weintroub is Research Fellow at the Wits Rock Art Research Institute.

More about the book

The Banting SolutionThe Banting Solution by Bernadine Douglas and Bridgette Allan
Penguin Random House South Africa

At last, the banting book that will answer ALL your questions about the banting lifestyle AND provide you with the solution to permanent weight loss!

The Banting Solution answers banters’ most pressing questions, including mythbusting, meal plans, and how to bant on a budget.

Most importantly, it teaches us how to get rid of those unwanted kilos and keep them off forever.

nullThe Reb and the Rebel: Jewish Narratives in South Africa 1892-1913 by Carmel Schrire and Gwynne Schrire
UCT Press

Unedited, unbowdlerised memoirs of the origin and development of the South African Jewish community are few and far between.

The Reb and the Rebel contains three previously unpublished autobiographical works – a diary, a poem and a memoir – by Yehuda Leib Schrire (1851-1912) and his son, Harry Nathan. Few of the early immigrants to South Africa were writers, let alone poets, and the social history provided in these documents embellishes and enlivens the picture of South African Jewish communities at the turn of the 20th century.

Mongrel: EssaysMongrel: Essays by William Dicey
Umuzi

From the author of the critically acclaimed Borderline (2004), Mongrel investigates a range of topics – radical environmentalism, the faultlines between farmer and farm worker, the joys and sorrows of reading – yet drifts of concern and sensibility draw the collection together. Several essays touch on how books can move, and sometimes maul, their readers.

Ivan Vladislavić says: “Dicey is what I look for in a writer: he has something to say and he puts it across with skill, intelligence and wit.”

More about the book

To Quote MyselfTo Quote Myself by Khaya Dlanga
Pan Macmillan

In To Quote Myself, Khaya Dlanga recounts entertaining and moving stories about his roots and upbringing in rural Transkei, how he made his mark at school as well as his time spent studying advertising and as a stand-up comedian.

Dlanga also shares his political views, and how he overcame homelessness to become one of the most influential marketers in South Africa.

The cover of this new edition, designed by Ayanda Mbanjwa, was the winning entry in a competition held by Pan Macmillan last year.

MARCH

Gang TownGang Town by Don Pinnock
Tafelberg

Gang Town is the winner of the 2013 City Press Non-fiction Award.

Why is Cape Town one of the most violent cities on earth? What is it that makes gangs so attractive to young people? Why is it getting worse? Bestselling author Don Pinnock answers these questions in Gang Town, and looks at solutions to the problem.

More about the book

nullUmkonto We Sizwe: The ANC’s Armed Struggle by Thula Simpson
Penguin Random House South Africa

Written in a fresh, immediate style, Umkhonto we Sizwe is an honest account of the armed struggle. It does not seek to glorify or to whitewash, but rather to chronicle a fascinating series of events from the beginning of the struggle to the negotiated settlement of the 1990s.

Thula Simpson is a senior lecturer in the Department of Historical and Heritage Studies at the University of Pretoria. He has spent a decade researching and writing on the history of the ANC’s liberation struggle. His research has been conducted in Swaziland, Zimbabwe, Zambia, Botswana, the United Kingdom and most extensively in South Africa.

nullExit! by Grizelda Grootboom
Jacana Media

Exit! is the story of Grizelda Grootboom life of prostitution and her ultimate escape from it all.

Grizelda’s life was dramatically changed when she was gang raped at the age of nine by teenagers in her township. Her story starts there. It is a story about the cycle of poverty, family abandonment, dislocation, and survival in the streets of Cape Town.

Grizelda is now an activist against human trafficking who supports fellow survivors undergoing rehabilitation.

Exit! is a BlackBird Books title.

nullOwn Your Space: The Toolkit for the Working Woman by Nadia Bilchik and Lori Miller
Pan Macmillan

Own Your Space provides practical tools and insights gleaned from workshops held around the world and from interviews with some of South Africa’s most accomplished women.

The book will provide you with tried-and-tested techniques, tips and advice to help you boost your career, enhance your confidence and truly own your space on every level.

nullThe End of Whiteness: Satanism and Family Murder in South Africa by Nicky Falkof
Jacana Media

Towards the end of apartheid, white South Africans found themselves in the middle of new social and political change that showed itself in some strangely morbid “symptoms”. This book discusses two of the primary symptoms that appeared in the media and in popular literature at the time – an apparent threat from a cult of white Satanists and a so-called epidemic of white family murder.

Nicky Falkof is senior lecturer in Media Studies at Wits University.

Critical Thinking, Science, and PseudoscienceCritical Thinking, Science, and Pseudoscience: Why We Can’t Trust Our Brains by Caleb W Lack and Jacques Rousseau

This unique text for undergraduate courses teaches students to apply critical thinking skills across all academic disciplines by examining popular pseudoscientific claims through a multidisciplinary lens.

From alien abductions and psychic phenomena to strange creatures and unsupported alternative medical treatments, the text uses examples from a wide range of pseudoscience fields and brings evidence from diverse disciplines to critically examine these erroneous claims.

nullThe Code: The Power of “I Will” by Shaun Tomson
Pan Macmillan

This book is about many things – faith, courage, creativity, determination – but above all it’s about the promises we make to ourselves about the future.

Shaun Tomson is a former World Surfing Champion, and considered one of the 16 greatest surfers of all time. He is a business finance graduate from the University of Natal and the creator of two popular apparel brands: Instinct in the 1980s and Solitude in the 1990s. He lives in Santa Barbara, California, and is an inspirational speaker.

nullTrail Blazer: My Life as an Ultra-distance Trail Runner by Ryan Sandes with Steve Smith
Zebra Press

What does it take to run a six-day race through the world’s harshest deserts? Or 100 miles in a single day at altitudes that would leave you breathless just walking? More than that, though: what is it like to win these races? South Africa’s ultra-trail-running superstar – and former rudderless party animal – Ryan Sandes has done just that.

Trail Blazer: My Life as an Ultra-distance Trail Runner is written with bestselling author and journalist Steve Smith.

nullIs It Just Me Or Is Everything Kak? The Zuma Years by Tim Richman
Burnet Media

Although we thought we’d got it all off our chests in the late 2000s with the original Is It Just Me Or Is Everything Kak? series, well, it’s back on our chests, isn’t it?

After the annus horribilus Saffercanus of 2015 – after the doom and gloom of How Long Will South Africa Survive? and We Have Now Begun Our Descent (NB: bestsellers!) – it’s time once again for a book that unites South Africans in their misery and allows us to laugh it off. Just in time for the National Elections, of course!

nullThe Story Of A House: Fables And Feasts From La Creuzette by Louis Jansen van Vuuren and Hardy Olivier
Quivertree

It took 15 years to fully restore the impressive Château de la Creuzette to her former glory. She continues to rest in her shaded park, surrounded by centuries-old trees, and welcomes her expectant guests with open arms.

Apart from the almost 90 new recipes, there is an additional Crookbook in which the two hosts share their easy shortcut recipes and tips. The Story of a House is not only two cookbooks in one, but also a richly adorned reading book that traces the history of a manor house and follows the story of its people.

Writing the DeclineWriting the Decline by Richard Pithouse
Jacana Media

This book tracks the steady decay of the democratic promise in recent years. Written from an understanding that democracy should be for everyone, rather than merely a contest between elites, it explores the growing authoritarianism of the state, the deepening social crisis, and avenues of hope and possibility.

Dr Richard Pithouse teaches politics at Rhodes University, where he lectures on contemporary political theory and urban studies.

Writing the Decline has received high praise from Niren Tolsi and Eusebius McKaiser.

nullThe Goddess Mojo Bootcamp by Kagiso Msimango
Jacana Media

The Goddess Mojo Bootcamp will help you discover an authentic you to find real long-lasting love.

This is the book for you whether you want a man for a reason, a season, a lifetime, or one to match each of your handbags … it has zero moral pontifications. It won’t warn you against sleeping with a man on the first date. There are no 90-day rules in this book.

Kagiso Msimango is the founder of The Goddess Academy and the author of The Goddess Bootcamp.

The Goddess Mojo Bootcamp is a MFBooks title.

nullRiver of Gold: Narratives and Exploration of the Great Limpopo by Mike Gardner, Peter Norton and Clive Walker
Jacana Media

Here for the first time is the only full account of South Africa’s most iconic river, its history, its ancient past, wildlife, landscapes, early kingdoms and their people, warfare, trade, slaves, 19th-century hunting, travel and adventures and the conservation efforts of four national parks of which the renowned Kruger National Park is one.

The book (and the river) encompasses two world heritage sites, two Transfrontier conservation areas, private game reserves, some of the richest rock art sites in southern Africa with the river’s “source” centred at the site of the world’s richest gold deposits ever discovered, Johannesburg.

nullThe Sword and the Pen: A Lifetime in South African Journalism by Allister Sparks
Jonathan Ball

Legendary journalist Allister Sparks joined his first newspaper at age 17. In The Sword and the Pen, he tells the story of how he watched and chronicled and participated in his country’s unfolding drama for more than 60 years.

Nelson Mandela said Sparks’s “outspoken views have served the cause of democracy in this country magnificently”.

In trenchant prose, he has written a remarkable account of both a life lived to its fullest capacity as well as the surrounding narrative of South Africa from the birth of apartheid, the rise of political opposition, the dawn of democracy, right through to the crisis we are experiencing today.

nullThabo Mbeki: A Jacana Pocket Biography by Adekeye Adebajo
Jacana Media

This is a fresh and concise reappraisal of Thabo Mbeki, South Africa’s second democratic president in succession to Nelson Mandela.

Though his term of office was controversial in many respects and ended in a spectacular palace coup at the ANC’s Polokwane Conference in 2007, his reputation has been gradually undergoing rehabilitation since then, particularly because of widespread disillusion his successor as president, Jacob Zuma.

Part of the Jacana Pocket series.

nullJack Simons – Teacher, Scholar and Comrade: A Jacana Pocket Biography by Hugh Macmillan
Jacana Media

Jack Simons (1907–1995) was one of the leading left-wing intellectuals – and one of the greatest teachers – in 20th-century South Africa.

As a lecturer in African Studies at the University of Cape Town from 1937 until he was prevented from teaching by the government in 1964, and thereafter through his lectures and writings in exile, he had a profound effect on the thinking of generations of white and black students and on the liberation movement as a whole.

Part of the Jacana Pocket series.

APRIL
nullFordsburg Fighter: The Journey of an MK Volunteer by Amin Cajee (as told to Terry Bell)
Cover2Cover

When Amin Cajee left South Africa to join the liberation struggle he believed he had volunteered to serve “a democratic movement dedicated to bringing down an oppressive and racist regime”.

Instead, he writes, in this powerful and courageous memoir, “I found myself serving a movement that was relentless in exercising power and riddled with corruption”.

nullThe Disruptors: Social Entrepreneurs Reinventing Business and Society by Kerryn Krige and Gus Silber
Bookstorm

Can business change the world? Can the world change business?

For a new breed of social entrepreneurs, striving to build and grow enterprises that fight social ills, foster opportunity, and help to improve society, the answer is not can, it’s must.

From healthcare to mobile gaming, from education to recycling, from dancing to gardening, these are the game-changers, the difference-makers, the doers of good. Here are their stories.

Kerryn Krige heads up the Network for Social Entrepreneurs at GIBS, and has worked in the social sector since 2001. Gus Silber is an award-winning journalist, editor speechwriter and author, with a special interest in social entrepreneurship.

nullThe Maverick Insider: A Struggle for Union Independence in a Time of National Liberation by Johnny Copelyn
Pan Macmillan

Johnny Copelyn is the CEO of Hosken Consolidated Investment (HCI) Limited and Johnnic Holdings Limited, a position he has held since 1997. From 1974 he was general secretary of various unions in the clothing and textiles industries before becoming a member of parliament in 1994.

The Maverick Insider provides a rich and detailed recording of the important years of building trade unions in South Africa from the 1970s onwards, in particular the Southern African Clothing and Textile Workers Union (SACTWU).

nullZimbabwe’s migrants and South Africa’s Border Farms: The Roots of Impermanence by Maxim Bolt
Wits University Press

“In precise, limpid prose, Maxim Bolt brings to life the human ecology of a border farm. [...] It is a significant achievement.” – Jonny Steinberg

During the Zimbabwean crisis, millions crossed through the apartheid-era border fence, searching for ways to make ends meet. Maxim Bolt explores the lives of Zimbabwean migrant labourers, of settled black farm workers and their dependants, and of white farmers and managers, as they intersect on the border between Zimbabwe and South Africa.

nullSouth Africa’s Settler Colonialism and Liberal Democracy by Thiven Reddy
Wits University Press

Two unmistakable features describe post-apartheid politics. The first is the formal framework of liberal democracy, including regular elections, multiple political parties, and a range of progressive social rights. The second is the politics of the “extraordinary”, which include a political discourse that relies on threats and the use of violence, the crude re-racialisation of numerous conflicts, and protests over various popular grievances.

In this highly original work, Thiven Reddy shows how conventional approaches to understanding democratisation have failed to capture the complexities of South Africa’s post-apartheid transition. Rather, as a product of imperial expansion, the South African state, capitalism and citizen identities have been uniquely shaped by a particular mode of domination, namely “settler colonialism”.

nullFrom Protest to Challenge: Volume 2: Hope and Challenge, 1935–1952 by Thomas G Karis and Sheridan Johns, revised and updated by Gail M Gerhart
Jacana Media

From Protest to Challenge is a multi-volume chronicle of the struggle to achieve democracy and end racial discrimination in South Africa.

Beginning in 1882 during the heyday of European imperialism, these volumes document the history of race conflict, protest, and political mobilisation by South Africa’s black majority.

Volumes 3, 5 and 6 of the series were launched in 2013.

nullThis Present Darkness: A History of Nigerian Organised Crime by Stephen Ellis
Jacana Media

Successful Nigerian criminal networks have a global reach, interacting with their Italian, Latin American and Russian counterparts. Yet in 1944, a British colonial official wrote that “the number of persistent and professional criminals is not great” in Nigeria and that “crime as a career has so far made little appeal to the young Nigerian”.

This latest book by celebrated African historian Stephen Ellis traces the origins of Nigerian organised crime to the last years of colonial rule, when nationalist politicians acquired power at regional level.

nullScorched Earth: 100 Years of Southern African Potteries by Wendy Gers
Jacana Media

Scorched Earth will be the first comprehensive history of fine art potteries in southern Africa, with a focus on pioneer ceramic studios and workshops.

Wendy Gers is a former curator at the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum, and now lectures at l’Ecole Supérieure d’Art et de Design de Valenciennes, France. Gers curated the prestigious Taiwan Ceramics Biennale 2014 and is a research associate at the University of Johannesburg and an associate advisor at The Design Cradle, Cape Town.

nullPromise and Despair: The First Struggle for a Non-Racial South Africa by Martin Plaut
Jacana Media

Most people believe that black South Africans obtained the vote for the first time in 1994. In fact, for almost a century suitably qualified black people had enjoyed the vote in the Cape and Natal, and in certain constituencies had decided the outcome of parliamentary elections.

This is the story of the struggle for a non-racial constitution, with its centrepiece being a lively account of the delegation that travelled to London in mid-1909, led by a famous white lawyer and former prime minister of the Cape, Will Schreiner, brother of the novelist Olive Schreiner.

MAY

Sigh the Beloved Country by Bongani Madondo
Pan Macmillan

With his customary flair and eye for detail, Bongani Madondo will delight his readers in this new essay collection.

The book displays his unique take on all things South African, including people and places, issues ranging from “Kissing & Lynching the Black Body” to “New Money Culture” and “Student Politics”, along with criticism and homage to our Beloved Country and those who call it home.

With a foreword by Rian Malan.

I am the Girl Who was Raped by Michelle Hattingh
Modjaji Books

In the morning Michelle Hattingh presented her Psychology honours thesis on men’s perceptions of rape, and in the evening she was raped herself.

Within minutes of getting help, Michelle realised she’ll never be herself again. She’s now “the girl who was raped”. Her memoir of this experience is an act of reclamation for herself and for all the women in South Africa who are raped every day.

Michelle Hattingh works as senior online content producer at Marie Claire SA. Her work has been published in Elle SA, Marie Claire SA and the Mail & Guardian. I’m the Girl Who was Raped is her first book.

Cold Case Confession by Alex Eliseev
Pan Macmillan

Whether the real mastermind behind the Tandiwe “Betty” Ketani murder will be captured remains unknown, so does the true motive for the crime. In court, prosecutors said the case was like a mosaic, with all the pieces coming together to form a disturbing picture. Not all the pieces have been found. But already, this has become one of South Africa’s most intriguing crime stories.

Dubbed a “troublemaker” for his investigative work, Eyewitness News reporter Alex Eliseev is an award-winning hard news journalist who has reported from countries such as Haiti, Japan and Libya.

nullThe Battle for Cosatu: An Insider’s View by Patrick Craven
Bookstorm

In The Battle for Cosatu, former Cosatu insider and national spokesperson Patrick Craven recounts the happenings of the last five years of the biggest and most powerful labour federation, leading up to the expulsion of Numsa and Zwelinzima Vavi.

Craven has become the go-to person for labour-related commentary. In this, his first book, we are given insight into one of the most tumultuous times for trade unions in post-apartheid South Africa.

Drawing strongly on personal recollections, media interpretations and official documents, Craven exposes the breakdown of the tripartite alliance – and the implications of this for South Africa’s labour movement and the country as a whole.

nullThe Road to Soweto by Julian Brown
Jacana Media

This account of the decade that preceded the Soweto Uprising of June 1976 will transform our understanding of this crucial flashpoint of South Africa’s history. It begins by showing how students at South Africa’s segregated white and black universities began to reorganise themselves as a political force; how new ideas about race reinvigorated political thought; and how debates around confrontation shaped the development of new forms of protest.

Julian Brown is a lecturer in the Department of Political Studies at Wits and the author of South Africa’s Insurgent Citizens.

nullYour First Year of Varsity: A Survival Guide for University and College by Shelagh Foster and Lehlohonolo Mofokeng
Bookstorm

Essential reading for matriculants, first year university and college students – and their parents!

Your First Year of Varsity talks directly to Grade 12 learners and first year students who arrive at their place of higher education filled with hopes, expectations, fears and dreams; yet with little understanding of what this new world means and how to adapt, grow – and graduate.

Shelagh Foster is the author of the highly popular Your First Year of Work. Lehlohonolo Mofokeng is a Master of Education candidate from Wits as a Mandela-Rhodes Scholar.

nullNatures of Africa: Ecocriticism and Animal Studies in Contemporary Cultural Forms edited by Fiona Moolla
Wits University Press

Environmental and animal studies are rapidly growing areas of interest across a number of disciplines, but there are few books that show how nature in Africa is represented, celebrated, mourned or commoditised.

Natures of Africa features new research from East Africa and Zimbabwe, as well as the ecocritical and eco-activist “powerhouses” of Nigeria and South Africa.

Fiona Moolla is the author of Reading Nuruddin Farah: The Individual, the Novel and the Idea of Home.

nullApartheid and The Making of a Black Psychologist by Chabani Manganyi
Wits University Press

Few autobiographies exploring the “life of the mind” and the “history of ideas” have come out of South Africa, and this intriguing memoir details what it meant to be a committed black intellectual activist during the apartheid years.

Starting with his rural upbringing in Mavambe in Limpopo province in the 1940s, Chabani Manganyi’s life story unfolds at a gentle pace, tracing the twists and turns of his journey from humble beginnings to Yale University in the USA, and beyond.

nullLand Dispossession and Resistance in Gordonia: A Hidden History of the Northern Cape, 1800-1990 by Martin Legassick

This book presents aspects of a generally unknown “brown” and “black” history of the Gordonia region of the Northern Cape Province, which has received relatively little attention from historians.

The essays are intended to emphasise the lives of ordinary people, and are also in part an exercise in “applied history” – historical writing with a direct application to people’s lives in the present.

nullAlways Anastacia: A Transgender Life in South Africa by Anastacia Tomson
Jonathan Ball

Born into an orthodox Jewish family in Johannesburg and brought up as a boy, Tomson was never sure how much of her conflicted sense of self to blame on her often troubled family life and strict upbringing. It would take her nearly 30 years, a great deal of questioning and a bravery she could never have imagined to find the peace and self-acceptance she had always sought.

Tomson’s moving memoir is the first of its kind in South Africa.

JUNE

nullBlacks DO Caravan by Fikile Hlatshwayo
Jacana Media

This book is written by a black woman whose voice so clearly disrupts the stereotypes that so many have grown accustomed to.

This trip began on 15 September 2014 and lasted three months. Fikile and her family visited over 25 caravan parks. They covered over 10 000 kilometres, and traversed all nine provinces. Fikile came to the realisation that South Africa is still a divided nation: “The idea that camping is for white people is so entrenched, and my question is, who set these standards?”

nullThe Big Fix by Ray Hartley
Jonathan Ball

Behind the 2010 World Cup lay years of corporate skulduggery, crooked companies rigging tenders and match-fixing involving the national team.

In The Big Fix, Ray Hartley reveals the story of an epic national achievement and the people who undermined it in pursuit of their own interests. It is the real story of the 2010 World Cup.

AB: The Autobiography by AB de Villiers
Pan Macmillan

This is AB’s story, in his own words … the story of the youngest of three talented, sports-mad brothers growing up in Warmbaths, of a boy who excelled at tennis, rugby and cricket, of a youngster who made his international debut at the age of 20 and was then selected in every single Test played by South Africa for the next 11 seasons, of a batsman who has started to redefine the art, being ranked among the world’s very best in Test, ODI and T20.

This is the story of a modern sporting phenomenon.

nullEntrepreneurship 101 Tackling the basics of business start-up in South Africa by Joshua Maluleke
Jacana Media

Entrepreneurship 101 aims to educate South Africans about the fundamentals of entrepreneurship while looking at a uniquely South African business environment.

Joshula Maluleke has included a section on frequently asked questions at the back of the book in an attempt to provide in-depth answers to some of the questions he gets asked at his entrepreneurship talks. Questions like: Can I register my spaza shop? I have registered a business with CIPC and government has not given me an opportunity to do business, what must I do?

The Thabo Mbeki I Know edited by Sifiso Ndlovu and Miranda Strydom
Pan Macmillan

The Thabo Mbeki I Know is a collection of contributions on and personal recollections about former South African President Thabo Mbeki.

In some cases, individuals have been interviewed about their interactions with Mbeki, specifically with this collection in mind, and other contributions have been authored by the individuals concerned.

These personal reflections present a fresh perspective on Mbeki’s time in office and his legacy.

nullA Citizen’s Guide to Crime Statistics by Anine Kriegler and Mark Shaw
Jonathan Ball

A Citizen’s Guide to Crime Statistics provides a basis to understand South Africa’s crime statistics in a manner that is accessible to the general public.

Each chapter challenges a set of oft-repeated assumptions about how bad crime is, where it occurs, and who its victims are. It also demonstrates how and why crime statistics need to be matched with other forms of research, including criminal justice data, in order to produce a fuller account of what we are faced with.

nullVerwoerd: Architect of Apartheid by Henry Kenney
Jonathan Ball

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr Hendrik Verwoerd by Dimitri Tsafendas.

Originally released in 1980, Henry Kenney’s incisive study of the architect of apartheid and paragon of Afrikaner nationalism will be republished in 2016 to coincide with this significant moment in South Africa’s modern history.

The new edition contains an introduction by David Welsh, Emeritus Professor at Stellenbosch University, bringing it into the 21st century and updating it for a new generation.


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