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Archive for the ‘Politics’ Category

“Bloody Brilliant” – Helen Zille Responds to Twitter Suggestions to Name Her Memoir

Twitter has erupted after the announcement this morning that Penguin Random House will be publishing Helen Zille’s memoir, with the hashtag #NameZillesMemoir trending as the top of the charts – and the former DA leader has responded in good humour.

The title suggestions range from tongue-in-cheek to downright harsh, but Zille has promised that if she ends up choosing one of them, the person who tweeted it will get the chance to write a short foreword to the book:

Zille has also retweeted some of her favourites, and added her own suggestion to the mix:

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She does, however, point out that she still has a lot of work to do on the book:

See some of the suggestions from the Twitter literati:

The UnsaidUnimportanceCould I Vote DA?MobinomicsVer in die wêreld, sushi

Why not add your suggestion to the list? Who knows, it could be your ticket to authorial fame.

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The 2015 Mail and Guardian Literary Festival Programme

The 2015 Mail & Guardian Literary Festival 1-2 August, 2015

 
The annual Mail & Guardian Literary Festival will run from 1-2 August at the Turbine Hall in Newtown Johannesburg, as part of the 2015 South African Book Fair.

Have a look at this year’s programme:

The Arrogance of PowerOn the PostcolonyEducation, Economy and Society

Saturday August 1, 9.30am
Goodbye to all that: Decolonising culture and institutions

Panel: Xolela Mangcu, Achille Mbembe, Leigh-Ann Naidoo and Thaddeus Metz
Chair: Salim Vally

Capitalist CrusaderHow South Africa WorksBRICS: An Anti-Capitalist CritiqueRaising the Bar

Saturday August 1, 11.30am
It’s the economy, stupid!

Panel: Herman Mashaba, Greg Mills and Patrick Bond
Chair: Songezo Zibi

Race, Class and PowerThe Limits of Democratic Governance in South AfricaWhat Will People SayA Flawed FreedomSouth Africa's Suspended Revolution

Saturday August 1, 1.30pm
South Africa at a fork in the road

Panel: Steven Friedman, Louis Picard, Rehana Rossouw and John Saul
Chair: Adam Habib

The Joburg BookThe Origins of Non-racialism

Saturday August 1, 3.30pm
Future perfect: Transforming Jo’burg from apartheid city to a city for all

Panel: Nechama Brodie, David Everatt, Zayd Ebrahim and Rashid Seedat.
Chair: Zeblon Vilakazi

The Seed ThiefAskarinullAntjie Krog and the Post-Apartheid Public SphereDiary of a Guji GirlPlatinum

Sunday August 2, 9.30am
South African fiction publishing at 21: Gatekeeping or rainmaking?

Panel: Fourie Botha (Umuzi), Bridget Impey (Jacana), Thabiso Mahlape (The Black Bird), Debra Primo (UKZN Press) and David Robbins (Porcupine Press)
Chair: Bronwyn Law-Viljoen

Antjie Krog and the Arrogance of PowerThe<br />
Post-Apartheid Public SphereMagema Fuze21 at 21The ANC Women's League

Sunday August 2, 11.30am
Black and white in colour: Why race (still) matters

Panel: Anthea Garman, Lewis Gordon, Xolela Mangcu, Hlonipha Mokoena and Melanie Verwoerd
Chair: Shireen Hassim

Arctic SummerThe Texture of ShadowsWay Back HomeGreen Lion101 DetectivesBad Sex

Sunday August 2, 1.30pm
The South African novel at 21
Panel: Damon Galgut, Mandla Langa, Niq Mhlongo, Henrietta Rose-Innes and Ivan Vladislavic
Chair: Leon de Kock

Empire, War & Cricket in South AfricaArctic SummerDF Malan and the Rise of Afrikaner NationalismThe Texture of ShadowsStrange Pilgrimages

Sunday August 2, 3.30pm
The Monuments Men: Rewriting reputation – Rhodes, Malan, Mandela & EM Forster

Panel: Dean Allen, Damon Galgut, Lindie Koorts and Mandla Langa
Chair: Achmat Dangor
 

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Tickets are available at webtickets.co.za and at the door on the day.

Programmes for the M&G Literary Festival and the South African Book Fair are online: southafricanbookfair.co.za

*Note Raks Seakhoa will no longer chair the South African fiction publishing at 21: Gatekeeping or rainmaking? panel. It will now be chaired by Bronwyn Law-Viljoen.
 

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Remembering Madiba: A Tribute to the Father of Our Nation on Nelson Mandela Day (Podcast, Video and a Free eBook)

 
Today people all over the world are celebrating the life and legacy of Nelson Mandela.

The name Nelson Mandela means different things for different people, but on this day we forget our differences and strive to do better, to live in a world built on the pillars of peace and reconciliation.

We pay tribute to a great man and salute him on this day:

Notes to the FutureA Jacana Pocket Biography: Nelson MandelaNelson MandelaLong Walk to FreedomGesprekke met myselfOur MadibaFinancial Mail Remembers Nelson Mandela 1918-2013Business Day Remembers Nelson Mandela 1918-2013Good Morning, Mr MandelaGoeiemore, Mnr. MandelaMadiba and MeThe Children's MadibaThe Book of Forgiving

 
Leading up to Mandela Day Power FM created and shared a documentary that celebrates the life of the great leader. In the podcast Madiba says, to the great amusement of the audience: “I would like to be remembered as a 91-year-old pensioner who’s looking for a job. It is for humanity of our society to decide how I should be remembered.”

The documentary explores Madiba’s homestead in Qunu in the Eastern Cape where he is buried in a modest grave alongside his closest family members. The archival footage captures some of Madiba’s greatest speeches and quotes, among others: “I never wanted to be regarded as an angel, I’m an ordinary human being with weaknesses, some of them fundamental, and I’ve made many mistakes in my life. I am not a saint, unless you think of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying.”

Who was Nelson Mandela? Here he tells you in his own words:

“I am the product of the people of South Africa. I am the product of the rural masses who inspired in me the pride in our past and the spirit of resistance. I am the product of the workers of South Africa who, in the mines, factories, fields and offices of our country, have pursued the principle that the interests of each are founded in the common interest of all. I am the product of Africa and her long-cherished dream of a rebirth that can now be realised so that all of her children may play in the sun.”

Listen to the 22-minute documentary, which features anecdotes from the man himself, including his famous retirement speech in which he said, “Don’t call me, I’ll call you”:

 

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Last year Pan Macmillan announced that they’ve acquired the rights to publish the sequel to Long Walk to Freedom, tentatively titled The Presidential Years. The Nelson Mandela Foundation also released the first pages of the sequel.

In the article South Africa’s former first lady Graça Machel said: “Madiba started working on a manuscript provisionally titled ‘The Presidential Years’ in 1998. He wanted to put on record his own reflections of those important years in his life (1994 – 1999) when he was President of South Africa. The book he had in mind was to be a natural progression from his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom.

“Circumstances did not allow him to complete the project. I am very pleased that a team comprising former senior advisors of his have accepted responsibility for completing this unfinished task on his behalf.”

In anticipation of this book, here is a preview of “Nelson Mandela: Presidential Years”:

 

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Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu released a statement on The Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation in commemoration of Madiba.

In the video Tutu says: “For 67 years, Nelson Mandela placed the welfare of others above his own.” He reflects of Madiba’s life, which he calls “a lifetime of selflessness” and concludes by saying: “Imagine how much better the world would be were we all to recognise our common humanity, as Madiba did, and do something kind for someone else every day?”

Watch the video:

YouTube Preview Image

 

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On the anniversary of Mandela’s release from prison on 11 February this year, Daily Planet shared a free eBook entitled Freedom for Nelson Mandela, published by Times Media Books.

The title sheds light on three key events surrounding Mandela’s release, with chapters entitled “Preparing for Nelson Mandela’s Release”, “The Day of Freedom 11 February 1990″ and “The Immediate Impact”.

Read the free eBook here:

Freedom for Nelson Mandela by Books LIVE

 

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What are doing for Mandela Day? Tell us on Facebook, Twitter or in the comment section below. Follow the hashtag #MandelaDay on Twitter for inspiration:


 

 

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Also read:

Book details

  • The Book of Forgiving: The Four-Fold Path of Healing For Ourselves and Our World by Desmond Tutu, Mpho Tutu
    EAN: 9780007512881
    Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Images courtesy of the SABC and Be Limitless


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6 Ideas for Your 67 Minutes this Mandela Day (for People Passionate About Books and Literacy)

International Mandela Day is celebrated on 18 July, on Nelson Mandela’s birthday. To commemorate the service of a great leader, people all over the world will devote 67 minutes (one minute for every year of Mandela’s public service) serving humanity and working towards the greater good.
 

A Jacana Pocket Biography: Nelson MandelaNelson MandelaLong Walk to FreedomLong Walk to FreedomGesprekke met myselfGoeiemore, Mnr. Mandela
Good Morning, Mr MandelaOur MadibaMandelaThe Cambridge Companion to Nelson MandelaThe Sporting Madiba: 50 Famous PhotosMadiba Magic

 
Mandela Day is a chance and an inspiration to make a significant difference and to be part of the global movement for good. EM Forster said, “One person with passion is better than 40 people merely interested”, so you should choose something you are passionate about. If, like us, your passion is books, we have six great ideas for how to spend your 67 minutes this year.

1. Tidy out your bookshelves and donate some pre-loved books to a charity shop, children’s home or community centre.

Belle's Bookshelf

 
2. Volunteer your time for a literacy programme or library project. The Shine Centre and Nal’ibali are two organisations that work throughout South Africa to promote literacy and reading culture, and there are many more organisations based in specific cities that do similar work.

The Shine Centre Observatory
Image courtesy of The Shine Centre

 
3. Start a “Take one, leave one” library in your neighbourhood or office. Watch this video from Little Free Library to find out how it works:

 

 
4. Get involved in Book Dash – an organisation that creates open-licensed books for children with help from volunteer creatives. You can donate money or your skills and time.

 
5. Support Short Story Day Africa, a project dedicated to promoting and developing African writers and writing. You can help to keep it going by buying the annual anthology or offering funding. Contact Rachel Zadok via email to arrange donations.
 
Watch this video to find out more:

YouTube Preview Image

 
6. Use Forgood to find out about worthy causes that suits your interests, skills, schedule and giving preferences in your area. You can browse causes by area or by categories, or you can create an offer for something you would like to do or donate.

Forgood

 

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Niren Tolsi Reviews How Long Will South Africa Survive? by RW Johnson

How Long Will South Africa Survive?: The Looming CrisisVerdict: stick

Johnson writes about “baboons” in a 2010 London Review of Books essay on South Africa when describing this country’s citizens and its African immigrants.

This is the time warp that Johnson inhabits as he sets out his basic premise: South Africa, as with other post-colonies on the continent, is in crisis. The country is headed towards an International Monetary Fund bail-out if it continues to vote in an ANC government that is rapacious in its members’ approach to the state, its resources and the tax base.

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Marianne Thamm Reviews Holy Cows by Gareth van Onselen

Holy CowsVerdict: stick

The lens through which Van Onselen wants to make sense of the world is “evidence driven”, based on irrefutable facts, data and above all, reason. All else is sloppy thinking. He also finds himself a proud liberal in a world where he has come to believe that the marrow, life and meaning is being sucked out of the political philosophy.

All of these qualities render Van Onselen a controversial, sharp and ruthless writer and commentator, although he does explain that he has attempted to author some chapters with humour and a dollop of melancholy.

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Practical Action to Decolonise the “White Literary System”: The African Flavour Books Case Study

Bridget Impey, MD of Jacana Media, and Fortiscue Helepi, the founder and owner of African Flavour Books

 
Fortiscue Helepi, the founder and owner of African Flavour Books, an independent bookshop in the Vaal, gave a presentation at the Jacana Media offices in Johannesburg last week as the first in the publisher’s series of talks titled “Continuing the Debate – Decolonising South Africa’s Literary Landscape”.

I Write What I LikenullCoconutLondon – Cape Town – JoburgWay Back HomeRachel’s Blue

 

Bridget Impey, MD of Jacana, opened the discussion with some background, and explained why the publisher wanted to continued the conversation.

“We were in the audience when Thando [Mgqolozana] made that declaration that he was leaving white literary festivals, and it was so goddamn brilliant,” she said. “There was such a good energy, there was such a good connection with all the people that were there. So we thought we had to keep the momentum going. It would be disappointing if we had Franschhoek and then we all went home and forgot about it.

“So we want to look at the practicalities. A lot of what happened at the follow-up event at Wits was people saying, we’ve got a situation – how do we change it?

“There are certain people who think we should go in, Stalin-style, and wipe out Franschhoek in one fell swoop. I’d rather build up new things.”

Forthcoming events include a discussion around the Google Mapping of all the independent booksellers in Johannesburg – including hair salons and street vendors – which is being undertaken by journalist Griffin Shea, and a talk by Mofenyi Malepe – author of the self-published book 283: The Bad Sex Bet, which has now sold almost 5 000 copies. Contact Jacana to find out more.

When asked where he stands on the “literary apartheid” debate, Helepi says the one message he is trying to preach is that black people must not sit back and wait for change.

“There are things that are very important to us, and we cannot sit on the fence and say, ‘people are not doing this for us’, when we don’t invest in it. I took R400 000 of my family’s money, that we saved the last three years, and I invested in this thing. Because it’s very important. I’m very passionate about it. You can’t point if you didn’t try. We need to invest our money. Where are our entrepreneurs?

“We have to ask ourselves what kind of legacy we are going to leave for our kids. We can’t leave that legacy of ‘we are not readers’. That’s not right.”

The story of African Flavour Books

Helepi, a chemical engineer, entrepreneur and author, opened African Flavour Books in February this year, after three years of research.

“It was a very long journey,” he says. “We always wondered why we didn’t have bookshops with African literature. I think most people come to this continent to get to the literature, and they still find American authors and European authors in the front of our bookshops.

“The other thing is that I am staying in the Vaal, and I had to travel every weekend an hour, at least, to come to Joburg, only to get to a bookshop that doesn’t have the books that I want.”

Helepi said he and his wife researched bookshops all over the country, and decided that there were so many authors, such as Zakes Mda, Niq Mhlongo, Zukiswa Wanner, that “this country needs to know about”.

The joys of starting a bookshop

“The nice thing that we found in the Vaal is that everyone wants a bookshop in their mall,” Helepi said. “So we could really negotiate prices. Some people cut their rental by R5 000!”

Helepi said he also wanted the design of his shop to attract any young kids that were walking by: “We wanted them to think it was an ice-cream shop! We wanted beautiful colours. We also have a nice kids’ area to encourage them.”

With the international trend of bookshops closing down, Helepi says a lot of people asked him why he was opening one. “We believe that it’s going to take a long time to get our lesser known authors on Amazon. In South Africa, people are still buying books in bookshops. And everyone is very excited about our bookshop.”

The challenges of starting a bookshop: Authors

Helepi says he always tells authors: “You need to market yourself as if you are self-published.”

He says he believes book events are vital to familiarise people with the work: “Most authors were not particularly excited at first, because our events were not really sponsored by their publisher, so we struggled and we are still trying to get authors to see the value of connecting with people. It’s a very new market and it needs to be encouraged.

“In our area there are a lot of students and they are very interested in the events, and they come. But it’s very difficult to get the authors there. Self-published authors are willing to work with us more, because have invested their own money.

“For us to create demand for the books, authors need to be out their marketing their material. If you don’t do that, your book will just collect dust.”

The challenges of starting a bookshop: Publishers

Helepi says publishers should also do more to market their authors.

“People cannot believe the collection of books that we have,” he says. “But I had to study. It took three years, and I researched on each and every website. Not every customer will have that passion. We need to make information available very, very easily.”

He was also disappointed that publishers always referred him to the distributor instead of handling his queries directly.

“The distributor doesn’t understand my needs; my needs are totally different. I want to see people who are not out there. I’m not trying to look like someone else, I’m not trying to be like Exclusive Books, I want to be totally different. I want someone who published a book in 2001 and it’s sitting there collecting dust – that’s the book I want. I want the material that people don’t know about. People are still trying to sell me Grey. I don’t want Grey. I don’t want it!

“I want to get the point where I have a 100 percent African bookshop. At the moment we are sitting at around 80 percent, to 20 percent international. Because you can’t say ‘no’ to a customer. If a customer says they want Grey, you need to give it to them.”

The challenges of starting a bookshop: Distributors and Booksellers

Helepi says his main frustration was with the distributors, from hard-to-navigate websites with outdated book catalogues, to bad communication, to poor tracking of payments.

“Because I’ve only been operating for four months, I’m working on a cash basis. So if I give you money, I want to get that money back as quickly as possible. When you are an independent bookshop, time is everything. Without cash flow, you will not stay afloat.”

The challenges of starting a bookshop: Readers

“With the market that I’m targeting there is that perception that people do not read,” Helepi said. “But you will find that actually people read.”

However, Helepi says the issue of “book travelling”, where one copy of a book is shared and passed along, is something he is trying to combat – and not chiefly for his own gain.

“What I’m trying to do now, is I’m stressing to everyone that comes into the shop the importance of keeping the copy. Because, yes, you might access it easier now, but in a couple of years later you will not have it. It’s better to make sure you have your own home library and keep all these books so that your kids can access them very easily.

“I want people to understand the value of buying books and keeping them, otherwise publishers don’t think people are reading.”

Helepi says theft is a big problem too, but that he designed to shop to be a big open space, which does help.

A lack of knowledge about local authors is another challenge Helepi faces, and he says he makes a point of taking his customers through the authors, because readers can be intimidated: “sometimes people want to read, but they don’t know where to start”.

He says his mother gave him Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country and a few other volumes, “and from there, I never stopped”.

“Someone needs to introduce you to reading, and we try to do that. We make sure we invest a lot of time in teaching young people about the authors that we have. We recommend books they can relate to, Kopano Matlwa is a good example, and from there they come back for more.

“We don’t want to start everyone on Long Walk to Freedom.

“We try to make sure the budget is in the right place. If you are buying Grey, the money is taken away from buying Kopano Matlwa or someone else.”

Helepi says people are shocked at the books they are able to get at his store, but he always makes sure he has a wide variety to suit all tastes.

“Our customers buy books either because they can relate to them or because they can learn from them. They don’t buy books just for the sake of buying books.”

The bestselling book at African Flavour Books is Steve Biko’s I Write What I Like, with Gayton McKenzie’s A Hustler’s Bible coming in second.

Incredibly, Helepi says fiction is the most popular genre. “I think people find it hard to get. We have everything, and people get excited.”

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Jennifer Malec tweeted from the event:


 

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Short-Changed? South Africa since 1994Steve BikoSouth Africa at War, 1939-1945Umkhonto weSizweGovan MbekiThe Soweto UprisingSan Rock Art

The ANC Women's LeagueSouth Africa's Struggle for Human RightsShakaThe ANC Youth LeaguePlague, Pox and PandemicsThe Idea of the ANCIngrid Jonker

 

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Highlights of the 2015 South African Book Fair

The 2015 South African Book Fair

 

Here are some of the highlights of the 2015 South African Book Fair, taking place in Johannesburg from 31 July to 2 August.

The SABF programme was released last week, and will feature over 100 authors, writers, poets, publishers and playwrights.

We’ve picked out some of the unmissable events from this year’s South African Book Fair:

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An Exceptionally Simple Theory (of Absolutely Everything)WastedFriday 10 AM (Brink Room)

Get published!

Mark Winkler talks about how he broke through the lit barrier and two publishers give their tips and suggestions on how to get published.
 
 
 

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Walter and Albertina SisuluFriday 12 PM (Achebe Room)

Why is it important to talk to children in their own language?

In this insightful talk, Elinor Sisulu, NLSA & PUO discuss “Children’s literature publishing in indigenous languages: How do we achieve a quantum leap?” Facilitated by the Puku Children’s Literature Foundation.
 
 
 

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Meaning in LifeThe Arrogance of PowerOn the PostcolonyWhat is Slavery to Me?Education, Economy and Society

Saturday 9:30 AM (Anglo Auditorium)

Goodbye to all that: Decolonising culture and institutions

Thaddeus Metz, Xolela Mangcu, Achille Mbembe & Pumla Gqola, chaired by Salim Vally. In conjunction with the M&G Literary Festival.
 
 

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The ReactiveThe Dream HouseFalse RiverWhat Will People Say

Saturday 11:30 AM (Gordimer Room)

The power of family

Leon de Kock discusses the sometimes complicated, sometimes supportive nature of the family with novelists Masande Ntshanga, Craig Higginson, Dominique Botha & Rehana Rossouw.
 
 

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101 DetectivesBroken MonstersPostcards from Soweto

Saturday 1 PM (Gordimer Room)

Stories from the street

Novelists Ivan Vladislavić, Lauren Beukes & Mokone Molete talk about their cities and the role they play in their lives. Moderated by Bontle Senne.
 
 

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A Flawed FreedomRace, Class and PowerThe Limits of Democratic Governance in South AfricaWhat Will People SaySouth Africa's Suspended Revolution

Saturday 1:30 PM

South Africa at a fork in the road (Anglo Auditorium)

John Saul, Steven Friedman, Louis Picard & Rehana Rossouw, chaired by Adam Habib. In conjunction with the M&G Literary Festival.
 
 

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Hugless Douglas Goes to Little SchoolSaturday 2 PM

Do you want to be an illustrator? (Alice’s Room)

Join award-winning David Melling as he shows you how he came to illustrate books, how he makes characters come to life and how you can learn to do the same. Interactive and fun! Age 7+
 
 

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Sunday 9:30 AM

South African fiction publishing at 21 (Brink Room)

Gatekeeping or rainmaking? – Fourie Botha (Umuzi), Bridget Impey (Jacana), Thabiso Mahlape (The Blackbird), Palesa Morudu (Cover2Cover), Debra Primo (UKZN Press) & David Robbins (Porcupine Press), chaired by Raks Seakhoa. In conjunction with the M&G Literary Festival.
 
 

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10 AM (Alice’s Room)

The Trouble With Cats (DC)

Wonder Woman races to save Batman & Superman from her arch-enemy, Cheetah on an island off the coast of Mozambique. The story takes a twist to Soweto where a young girl has to find her inner heroine & save the day. Lauren Beukes & art by Mike Maihack. Suitable for age 5+ & includes a brief talk on how comics are made. Grown-up comic fans welcome. Dressing up as a super hero is encouraged!
 
 

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African Delights101 DetectivesStrange PilgrimagesThe Reactive

11:30 AM (Gordimer Room)

Shorts

Siphiwo Mahala talks to Ivan Valdislavić, Achmat Dangor & Masande Ntshanga about the art of the short story.
 
 

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The RaftThe LegacyBroken MonstersDark Windows

1 PM (Gordimer Room)

Science fiction, fantasy and horror – what are the rules of this new reality?

Speculative fiction is explored by Fred Strydom, Melissa Delport & Lauren Beukes. Chaired by Louis Greenberg.
 
 

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Bad SexArctic SummerThe Texture of ShadowsWay Back HomeGreen Lion101 Detectives

1:30 PM (Anglo Auditorium)

The South African novel at 21

Leon de Kock discusses with novelists Damon Galgut, Mandla Langa, Niq Mhlongo, Henrietta Rose-Innes and Ivan Vladislavić. In conjunction with the M&G Literary Festival.
 
 

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2:30 PM (Achebe Room)

Want to try your hand at professional editing?

Join this 50-minute hands-on workshop to see if editing is meant for you. “A lightning tour of the skill of editing” will have exercises and questions, so come expecting to be challenged … and supported. Please book early as we will need to restrict the number of participants to 25.
 
 

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3 PM (Alice’s Room)

A dress-up “Mad Hatter’s Tea Party”

In celebration of Alice in Wonderland’s 150th anniversary and the launch of Alice in isiZulu, with readings in both English and isiZulu. The Queen of Tarts, Tina Bester, will be serving it up! Prizes for the best-dressed! On the guest list – the Gruffalo, Wally, Floppy, Peter Rabbit and more … The grand finale to the bookfair!
 
 

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Empire, War & Cricket in South AfricaArctic SummerDF Malan and the Rise of Afrikaner NationalismThe Texture of ShadowsStrange Pilgrimages

4 PM (Anglo Auditorium)

The Monuments Men: Rewriting reputation – Rhodes, Malan, Mandela & EM Forster

Dean Allen, Damon Galgut, Lindie Koorts & Mandla Langa, chaired by Achmat Dangor. In conjunction with the M&G Literary Festival.
 
 

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102 Writers and Illustrators Confirmed for 2015 Open Book Festival (So Far)

Confirmed authors for the 2015 Open Book Festival

 

The Book Lounge and the Fugard Theatre have announced the fifth edition of the Open Book Festival, and have released the names of the 82 local and 20 international participants confirmed so far.

The year’s Open Book will take place from 9-13 September in Cape Town. Venues include The Fugard Theatre, Homecoming Centre, Cape Town Central Library and The Book Lounge.

Mervyn Sloman, festival director, says: “We’re thrilled to announce a fantastic line-up for the fifth edition of Open Book. Festival goers have a wealth of stimulating and entertaining experiences to look forward to. South African writers will be sharing the stage with authors from Congo, Denmark, France, Kenya, Netherlands, Nigeria, Norway, Russia, Sweden, Ukraine, United Kingdom, USA and Zimbabwe.

“We’re in the process of finalising the events that make up the festival and the programme will be available at the beginning of August.”

Tickets will be available from early August.

Note: The list of participants below is not final

Home RemediesBroken MonstersShouting in the DarkKopskootDevil's HarvestLion Heart

Confirmed South African authors:

Diane Awerbuck

Lauren Beukes

Elleke Boehmer

Lien Botha

Andrew Brown

Mary Burton

Kay Carmichael

Justin Cartwright

PapwaNaweekThe Last Road TripWhat About MeeraBest White and Other Anxious DelusionsThe Chameleon House

Maxine Case

Toast Coetzer

Gareth Crocker

Raphael D’Abdon

ZP Dala

Rebecca Davis

Melissa de Villiers

Jean de Wet

To Quote MyselfThe FetchShades of DarknessThe Impossible FiveThe Ghost-Eater and Other StoriesDance with Suitcase

Khaya Dlanga

Finuala Dowling

Jonty Driver

Justin Fox

Genna Gardini

Dawn Garisch

Lost and Found in JohannesburgA Renegade called SimphiweThe Search for the Rarest Bird in the WorldBeastkeeperThe Dream HouseJozi

Mark Gevisser

Pumla Gqola

Vernon RL Head

Cat Hellisen

Joey Hi-Fi

Derrick Higginbotham

Craig Higginson

Perfect Hlongwane

TakelwerkThe Space Between the Space BetweenAlphabet of DemocracySynapseGood Morning, Mr MandelaThe Texture of Shadows

Nic Hoekstra

Daniel Hugo

Gerhard Human

John Hunt

Anton Kannemeyer

Antjie Krog

Jacqui L’Ange

Zelda la Grange

Mandla Langa

Debbie Loots

CobraDub StepsBlood tiesRusty BellThe Violent Gestures of LifeThe Alphabet of Birds

Danelle Malan

Anthony Marshall-Smith

David McLennan

Deon Meyer

Andrew Miller

Paul Mills

Zimkitha Mlanzeli

Nthikeng Mohlele

Tauriq Moosa

Tshifhiwa Given Mukwevho

SJ Naudé

One Hand Washes the Other Power PlaySharp EdgesChants of FreedomHere I AmThe Spiral House

Chris Nicholson

Mike Nicol

Su Opperman

SA Partridge

Mathews Phosa

PJ Powers

Shirmoney Rhode

Claire Robertson

Green LionWhat Will People SayWhat Hidden LiesA Slim, Green SilenceTokoloshe SongBanquet at Brabazan

Henrietta Rose-Innes

Rehana Rossouw

Michele Rowe

Beverly Rycroft

Andrew Salomon

Patricia Schonstein

Stephen Segerman

Katleho Shoro

In die blou kampA Man of Good HopeSkuldigThe RaftChokers en survivorsThe Swan Whisperer

Dana Snyman

Jonny Steinberg

Martin Steyn

Craig Bartholomew Strydom

Fred Strydom

Onkgopotse JJ Tabane

Nathan Trantraal

Marlene van Niekerk

JudaskusThis One TimeThings I Thought I KnewWastedIt Might Get Loud

Rudie van Rensberg

Alex van Tonder

Anja Venter

Mandy J Watson

Kathryn White

Mark Winkler

Ingrid Winterbach

 
 
International authors:

Never Tickle a TigerSex and the CitadelWe Are All Completely Beside OurselvesA Place Called WinterThe Book of MemoryWords Will Break Cement

Marc Boutavant (France)

Shereen El Feki (UK)

Karen Joy Fowler (USA)

Patrick Gale (UK)

Petina Gappah (Zimbabwe)

Masha Gessen (Russia)

The Hormone FactoryUkraine DiariesThe Lights of Pointe-NoireH is for HawkThe House That Jack BuiltLives of Others

Saskia Goldschmidt (Netherlands)

Andrey Kurkov (Ukraine)

Alain Mabanckou (Congo)

Helen Macdonald (UK)

Jakob Melander (Denmark)

Neel Mukherjee (UK)

Foreign Gods, Inc.Into a Raging BlazeDustThe Sleeper and the SpindleOne of UsFind MeReliquaria

Okey Ndibe (Nigeria)

Andreas Norman (Sweden)

Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor (Kenya)

Chris Riddell (UK)

Asne Seierstad (Norway)

Laura van den berg (USA)

RA Villanueva (USA)

Svante Weyler (Sweden)

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South Africans Need to Be Uncomfortable – Alan Paton Award Winner Jacob Dlamini “Echoes Antjie Krog” in His Acceptance Speech

Jacob Dlamini

 
AskariJacob Dlamini was announced as the winner of the 2015 Alan Paton Award on Saturday night, for his book Askari: A story of collaboration and betrayal in the anti-apartheid struggle, and took the opportunity to stress that South Africans should “notice the kak” that exists around them in their country.

The Alan Paton Award, in its 26th year, recognises books that demonstrate “the illumination of truthfulness, especially those forms of it that are new, delicate, unfashionable and fly in the face of power; compassion, elegance of writing, and intellectual and moral integrity”. It is awarded concurrently with the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize, which went to Damon Galgut for Arctic Summer. Both winners receive R100 000.

The judges called Askari “a considered examination of South Africa after 20 years of democracy”, and an “exceptionally brave, groundbreaking book, learned without being ponderous, with an insistent moral compass”.

Jonny Steinberg received an honourable mention from the judges for his book, A Man of Good Hope.

Read Dlamini’s acceptance speech, in which he responds in part to keynote speaker Antjie Krog’s comments:

Jacob Dlamini

A few days ago a friend asked if he should pray for me. And I said, well, I don’t know, if you’re so inclined, maybe, but it’s such a strong list, that whoever wins this evening, will have deserved the prize. So I’m honoured to have been among the people shortlisted for this prize. It’s been a remarkable year for non-fiction in South Africa.

I just want to echo what Antjie said. I’ve been away from South Africa for 12 years now, but I come home quite often, and I know that I’ve been back home for too long when I stop noticing the beggars on the street. That’s when I know that I’ve been back home too long. When I come back and it still registers, that there’s something going on in this country, that it’s not right, I know that I’m trying to see this place with fresh eyes.

There’s something about this place that deadens the soul. That deadens the imagination. And of course, as you can see from the quality of the work on display here today, there are many of us who try valiantly to challenge that.

But I want to echo Antjie: I want you to be uncomfortable. There’s nothing about this country that should make us comfortable. We’ve got a lot of work to do. We need to be uncomfortable. You know that you’ve been here too long when you are comfortable. When you don’t notice the kak around you.

So with that I just want to say thank you. Thank you to Jacana, you’ve been amazing. I’m overwhelmed.

View some photos from the event:

 

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