Sunday Times Books LIVE Community Sign up

Login to Sunday Times Books LIVE

Forgotten password?

Forgotten your password?

Enter your username or email address and we'll send you reset instructions

Sunday Times Books LIVE

Archive for the ‘Tafelberg’ Category

“We have to stop leaving activism to activists; the time to bring in another mindset is now” – Mark Heywood at Johannesburg launch of Get Up! Stand Up!

The Johannesburg launch of social justice activist and executive director of Section 27, Mark Heywood’s, memoir Get Up! Stand Up! recently took place at the Radium Beer Hall.

Heywood was in conversation with radio presenter and award-winning author Redi Tlhabi.

Surrounded by newspaper-headings with captions such as ‘Your bra can kill you’ and ‘The politics of a blowjob’, with the less-than-faint tones of Bob Marley in the background, Heywood and Tlhabi’s point of entry revolved around Heywood’s strained relationship with his father and how their different ideologies and value systems motivated his commitment to combat social injustices.

Heywood was born in Nigeria but raised in Gaborone, Botswana. His father – who comes from a working-class background – was a manager at Barclays Gaborone and is described by Heywood as a cold, prejudiced and unfeeling man.

Heywood’s first act of challenging the political status quo was as a teenager at a golf club in Gaborone where he – along with a few young, black caddies – drunkenly sang Nkosi sikelel’ iAfrika. Heywood senior did not take kindly to this…

After an incident where he was threatened by the security police in Johannesburg’s Carlton Centre, Heywood left the country for England and became involved with the UK miners’ strike, which he described as “a baptism”.

Throughout his discussion with Tlhabi, Heywood stressed the importance and necessity of creating a just, equal society independent of a governing body, or established activists.

Heywood strongly criticised Thabo Mbeki’s HIV/AIDS-denialism, adding that over 300 000 HIV-related deaths could have been prevented during Mbeki’s tenure owing to insufficient access to antiretrovirals. It was after having met, and befriending, Zackie Achmat and Edwin Cameron that Heywood realised what a massive threat HIV would be to South Africa and South Africans regarding equality and dignity.

The topic of non-racialism was raised by an audience member, to which Heywood replied that we, as South Africans, have to re-prove non-racialism and rebuild the sense of trust which existed during the struggle period of the 1980s.

After a raucous rendition of “Happy Birthday” (Heywood had celebrated his birthday the previous day), Heywood and Tlhabi left the stage to chat with the crowd, pose for many-a selfie, and – in Tlhabi’s case – sway her hips and sing along to Redemption Song.

Aitsa!


» read article

UJ Prize for South African Writing shortlist announced

The University of Johannesburg has announced the shortlist of its annual literary award. Approximately 60 works were submitted, from which the following books were selected for the shortlist:

Main Prize:
Pleasure by Nthikeng Mohlele
The Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso
Sigh, the Beloved Country by Bongani Madondo

Debut Prize:
The Yearning by Mohale Mashigo
Loud and Yellow Laughter by Sindiswa Busuku-Mathese
Tjieng Tjang Tjerries and Other Stories by Jolyn Philips
The Keeper of the Kumm by Sylvia Vollenhoven

The prizes are not linked to a specific genre. This may make the evaluation more challenging in the sense that, for example, a volume of poetry, a novel and a biographical work must be measured against one another, but the idea is to open the prize to as many forms of creative writing as possible.

The main prize is R75 000.

The debut prize is R35 000.

A formal prize-giving ceremony will be held at a function later in the year.

Pleasure

Book details

 
 
The Woman Next Door

 
 
 

Sigh The Beloved Country

 
 
 

The Yearning

 
 
 

Loud and Yellow Laughter

 
 
 

Tjieng Tjang Tjerries and other stories

 
 
 

Keeper of the Kumm


» read article

Casterbridge Lifestyle Centre to again host the Lowveld Book Festival

Due to the success of the inaugural Lowveld Book Festival last year, the festival will once more take place at Casterbridge Lifestyle Centre in White River, Mpumalanga, from 18 to 20 August 2017.

The Lowveld is not only home to many of South Africa’s literary talents, but is also the setting for a vast array of books and poems.

The response from publishers, authors and visitors was overwhelmingly positive last year, and this year visitors can look forward to a host of interesting authors, including Karina Szcuzurek (The Fifth Mrs Brink), Tony Park, Adam Cruise, Athol Williams, Bridget Hilton-Barber, Elaine Pillay, Tracy Todd, Mercy Dube, Mario Cesare, Jayne Bauling, Derick van der Walt, DJ Sbu and Isabella Morris to name a few, as well as a socio-political discussion, various workshops and poetry readings.

Tony Park
Tony is the author of 13 novels, set in Africa, and six biographies. His 14th novel, The Cull, about an elite anti-poaching squad, is due for release in October 2017.

Adam Cruise
Adam is a conservation and travel writer, who works for a variety of magazines and newspapers. His books include the well-received Louis Botha’s War in 2015 and In the Pursuit of Solitude (2012). Adam has just moved back to South Africa, to Sabie, after spending a few years writing and indulging in the Mediterranean culture on the French Riviera.

Athol Williams
Athol is an award-winning poet and social philosopher. He is the author of Pushing Boulders: Oppressed to Inspired, which tells of his journey from poverty to earning master’s degrees from five of the world’s top universities including Harvard, Oxford and LSE. He is the only person to be awarded the Sol Plaatje EU Poetry Award twice, was a winner of a poetry prize at Oxford, and was a runner-up for the 2016 SA Literary Award for Poetry. He has published three books of poetry and is the author of the Oaky series of children’s books. He is currently a doctoral candidate Oxford University.

Bridget Hilton-Barber
Bridget’s colourful career in the media spans more than two decades. Former travel correspondent for Radio 702 and former editor of South African Airways’ (SAA) magazine Sawubona, she is best known for her wild and wacky travel writing and books. Her first memoir, Garden of My Ancestors was a bestseller. Now in her ninth book, a political memoir, Bridget takes you on a poignant journey back to her life as a student activist in the final days of apartheid in the mid 80s where she was betrayed by a police spy and ended up in jail.

Elaine Pillay
Elaine has written academic books and short stories. Zwai and the Little Creature is her first children’s book. In March 2017, she represented South Africa in Fiji Islands at the Centennial Celebration of the Abolition of Indentured Labour in Fiji.

Mario Cesare
Mario’s career has taken him from Timbavati and Mala Mala to Olifants River. His memoir – Man-eaters, Mambas and Marula Madness – provides a wealth of lessons on conservation and stories of life in the bush, as it is enjoyed only by those fortunate enough to live on a Big Five reserve.

More recently, Mario wrote The Man with the Black Dog, a touching story of a man and his faithful canine companion. With a naturalist’s eye for detail and the bigger picture of managing a fragile ecosystem through years of drought and plenty, Mario brings a storyteller’s delight – and a dash of Italian passion – to sharing his world.

Jayne Bauling
Jayne’s 25th book will be published during 2017 – Game Plan, the third novel in her Soccer Season trilogy for Cover2Cover Books. Her first 17 novels were romances, published by Mills & Boon in the UK, and translated into over 20 languages. In recent years, her focus has been on writing for youth. Her YA novels have been awarded the Macmillan Writers Prize for Africa, the Sanlam Gold Prize for Youth Literature and the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award. One of them, Dreaming of Light (NB Publishers), was chosen to represent South Africa on the 2014 IBBY Honour List, and was also shortlisted for the Media24 M.E.R Prize for best youth novel. Two of her novels have been DBE-approved as high school set-works. Her short stories for adults and youth have been published in a number of anthologies and literary journals, and two have been shortlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, while she has twice had stories for younger children shortlisted for the Golden Baobab prize. She has won poetry prizes from SAfm Radio and People Opposing Women Abuse. She also writes stories for FunDza Literacy Trust. A former Johannesburger, Bauling now lives in White River, Mpumalanga.

A bumper programme

The organisers’ goal is to reach out to the surrounding rural schools and expose children to the joy of stories and reading; to encourage teenagers to read more, whether electronic or printed books; and to support local writers and illustrators through workshops hosted by published authors.

“We hope to draw visitors and well-known authors from across the country to White River and introduce them to the creative talent resident here, as well as to motivate local authors and artists by uncovering their work and exposing them to a wider world of literature,” explains Louis van der Merwe, Chairman of the Lowveld Book Festival.

A balanced programme is promised, with the inclusion of poetry, folklore, workshops, storytelling and story-time for youngsters, panel discussions, historical Lowveld literature, interviews with authors, YA literature, performing art and a book fair.

South African authors will be selling and autographing their latest publications and authors will be slotted into events to ensure interesting discussions that grapple with the issues confronting South African literature and reading.

The Lowveld Book Festival is a multi-cultural event that will encourage a love of reading and acknowledge the role played by writers and poets in society, and we seek financial partners who embrace this important objective.

The full programme and information about ticket sales will be available from mid-June at www.lowveldbookfestival.co.za. For more information, follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or email lowveldbookfestival@gmail.com.

The Fifth Mrs Brink

Book details

 
 
 

Louis Botha's War

 
 
 

In the Pursuit of Solitude

 
 
 

Pushing Boulders

 
 
 

Garden of My Ancestors

 
 
 

Man-eaters, Mambas and Marula Madness

 
 
 

Dreaming of Light


» read article

10 books to read this Freedom Day

23 years ago, on the 27th of April 1994, South Africa celebrated its first non-racial democratic election, with Nelson Mandela inaugurated as the first black president of South Africa on Tuesday 10 May at the Union Building in Pretoria.

We recommend the following books, both works of fiction and non-fiction, as an introduction to South Africa’s apartheid history and the country’s transition to democracy:

Freedom in Our LifetimeFreedom in our Lifetime
Anton Lembede, edited by Robert R Edgar and Luyanda ka Msumza

When a group of young political activists met in 1944 to launch the African National Congress Youth League, it included the nucleus of a remarkable generation of leaders who forged the struggle for freedom and equality in South Africa for the next half century: Nelson Mandela, Oliver Tambo, Walter Sisulu, Ellen Kuzwayo and AP Mda. It was Anton Lembede, however, whom they chose as their first president.

Lembede, who had just begun practicing law in Johannesburg, was known for his sharp intellect, fiery personality, and unwavering commitment to the struggle at hand.

His untimely death in 1947 at the age of 33 sent a wave of grief through the Congress Youth, who had looked to him for moral as well as political leadership. With the publication of Freedom in our Lifetime, we acknowledge Lembede’s early contribution to the freedom movement, in particular his passionate and eloquent articulation of the African-centered philosophy he called “Africanism”.
 
 

Long Walk to FreedomLong Walk to Freedom
Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela is one of the great moral and political leaders of our time: an international hero whose lifelong dedication to the fight against racial oppression in South Africa won him the Nobel Peace Prize and the presidency of his country. Since his triumphant release in 1990 from more than a quarter-century of imprisonment, Mandela has been at the center of the most compelling and inspiring political drama in the world. As president of the African National Congress and head of South Africa’s anti-apartheid movement, he was instrumental in moving the nation toward multiracial government and majority rule. He is revered everywhere as a vital force in the fight for human rights and racial equality.

Long Walk to Freedom is his moving and exhilarating autobiography. Here for the first time, Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela tells the extraordinary story of his life–an epic of struggle, setback, renewed hope, and ultimate triumph.
 
 
Country of My Skull
Antjie Krog

Ever since Nelson Mandela dramatically walked out of prison in 1990 after twenty-seven years behind bars, South Africa has been undergoing a radical transformation. In one of the most miraculous events of the century, the oppressive system of apartheid was dismantled. Repressive laws mandating separation of the races were thrown out. The country, which had been carved into a crazy quilt that reserved the most prosperous areas for whites and the most desolate and backward for blacks, was reunited. The dreaded and dangerous security force, which for years had systematically tortured, spied upon, and harassed people of color and their white supporters, was dismantled. But how could this country–one of spectacular beauty and promise–come to terms with its ugly past? How could its people, whom the oppressive white government had pitted against one another, live side by side as friends and neighbors?

To begin the healing process, Nelson Mandela created the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, headed by the renowned cleric Archbishop Desmond Tutu. Established in 1995, the commission faced the awesome task of hearing the testimony of the victims of apartheid as well as the oppressors. Amnesty was granted to those who offered a full confession of any crimes associated with apartheid. Since the commission began its work, it has been the central player in a drama that has riveted the country. In this book, Antjie Krog, a South African journalist and poet who has covered the work of the commission, recounts the drama, the horrors, the wrenching personal stories of the victims and their families. Through the testimonies of victims of abuse and violence, from the appearance of Winnie Mandela to former South African president P. W. Botha’s extraordinary courthouse press conference, this award-winning poet leads us on an amazing journey. Country of My Skull captures the complexity of the Truth Commission’s work. The narrative is often traumatic, vivid, and provocative. Krog’s powerful prose lures the reader actively and inventively through a mosaic of insights, impressions, and secret themes. This compelling tale is Antjie Krog’s profound literary account of the mending of a country that was in colossal need of change.
 
 
I Write What I Like
Steve Biko

“The most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.” Like all of Steve Biko’s writings, those words testify to the passion, courage, and keen insight that made him one of the most powerful figures in South Africa’s struggle against apartheid. They also reflect his conviction that black people in South Africa could not be liberated until they united to break their chains of servitude, a key tenet of the Black Consciousness movement that he helped found.

I Write What I Like contains a selection of Biko’s writings from 1969, when he became the president of the South African Students’ Organization, to 1972, when he was prohibited from publishing. The collection also includes a preface by Archbishop Desmond Tutu; an introduction by Malusi and Thoko Mpumlwana, who were both involved with Biko in the Black Consciousness movement; a memoir of Biko by Father Aelred Stubbs, his longtime pastor and friend; and a new foreword by Professor Lewis Gordon.

Biko’s writings will inspire and educate anyone concerned with issues of racism, postcolonialism, and black nationalism.
 
 
A Passion for Freedom
Mamphela Ramphele

The richly anecdotal story of an extraordinary life – when baby Mamphela was born to teacher parents in the rural village of Kranspoort few would have predicted that she would become not only a medical doctor, but an international leader and the founder of not one but two new political movements. As a young woman, Mamphela was instrumental in creating the ideology of Black Consciousness with her partner, Steve Biko. As an accomplished and well-off businesswoman who had reached the pinnacle of success, this year she felt compelled to start Agang SA, to provide South African voters with an alternative to the inept and increasingly corrupt ANC.

In this very readable autobiography, Mamphela Ramphele vividly describes her rural childhood, her extended family, her first loves and losses – after the death of her firstborn, she nearly lost her and Steve’s baby after his death by torture – and her subsequent successes in both politics and business.

 
 
Cry, the Beloved CountryCry, the Beloved Country
Alan Paton

Cry, the Beloved Country is one of the most famous and important novels in South Africa’s history, was an immediate worldwide bestseller in 1948. Alan Paton’s impassioned novel about a black man’s country under white man’s law is a work of searing beauty.

“Cry, the beloved country, for the unborn child that is the inheritor of our fear. Let him not love the earth too deeply. Let him not laugh too gladly when the water runs through his fingers, nor stand too silent when the setting sun makes red the veld with fire. Let him not be too moved when the birds of his land are singing, nor give too much of his heart to a mountain or valley. For fear will rob him of all if he gives too much.”

The eminent literary critic Lewis Gannett wrote, “We have had many novels from statesmen and reformers, almost all bad; many novels from poets, almost all thin. In Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country the statesman, the poet and the novelist meet in a unique harmony.”

Cry, the Beloved Country is the deeply moving story of the Zulu pastor Stephen Kumalo and his son, Absalom, set against the background of a land and a people riven by racial injustice. Remarkable for its lyricism, unforgettable for character and incident, Cry, the Beloved Country is a classic work of love and hope, courage and endurance, born of the dignity of man.
 
 
July's PeopleJuly’s People
Nadine Gordimer

For years, it has been what is called a ‘deteriorating situation’. Now all over South Africa the cities are battlegrounds. The members of the Smales family – liberal whites – are rescued from the terror by their servant, July, who leads them to refuge in his native village.

What happens to the Smaleses and to July – the shifts in character and relationships – gives us an unforgettable look into the terrifying, tacit understandings and misunderstandings between blacks and whites.
 
 
 
 
 

Tomorrow is Another Country
Tomorrow is Another Country
Allister Sparks

The companion to Allister Sparks’s award-winning The Mind of South Africa, this book is an extraordinary account from South Africa’s premier journalist of the negotiating process that led to majority rule.

Tomorrow is Another Country retells the story of the behind-the-scenes collaborations that started with a meeting between Kobie Coetsee, then minister of justice, and Nelson Mandela in 1985. By 1986, negotiations involved senior government officials, intelligence agents, and the African National Congress. For the next four years, they assembled in places such as a gamepark lodge, the Palace Hotel in Lucerne, Switzerland, a fishing hideaway, and even in a hospital room.

All the while, De Klerk’s campaign assured white constituents nothing would change. Sparks shows how the key players, who began with little reason to trust one another, developed friendships which would later play a crucial role in South Africa’s struggle to end apartheid.
 

The Smell of Apples
The Smell of Apples
Mark Behr

Set in the bitter twilight of apartheid in South Africa in the 1970s, The Smell of Apples is a haunting story narrated by eleven-year-old Marnus Erasmus, who records the social turmoil and racial oppression that are destroying his own land.

Using his family as a microcosm of the corroding society at large, Marnus tells a troubling tale of a childhood corrupted, of unexpected sexual defilements, and of an innocence gone astray.
 
 
 
 
 

Kaffir Boy
Kaffir Boy
Mark Mathabane

Mark Mathabane was weaned on devastating poverty and schooled in the cruel streets of South Africa’s most desperate ghetto, where bloody gang wars and midnight police raids were his rites of passage. Like every other child born in the hopelessness of apartheid, he learned to measure his life in days, not years. Yet Mark Mathabane, armed only with the courage of his family and a hard-won education, raised himself up from the squalor and humiliation to win a scholarship to an American university.

This extraordinary memoir of life under apartheid is a triumph of the human spirit over hatred and unspeakable degradation. For Mark Mathabane did what no physically and psychologically battered “Kaffir” from the rat-infested alleys of Alexandra was supposed to do — he escaped to tell about it.

Book details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


» read article

Jacket Notes: Lesley Smailes on why she needed to write about living 10 years in a cult in Cult Sister

Published in the Sunday Times

Cult Sister•Cult Sister
Lesley Smailes (Tafelberg)

Driven by a need for acceptance and a desire to be clean from all the drama of my high-school years, I gave my life to God after I wrote my final matric exam. Soon after finishing school I left on an overseas trip that, instead of being a gap-year, stretched into 10 years of being in a cult in America.

My long-suffering mother suggested I write a book after I returned to South Africa, but it was only 15 years later that I could write it. I wrote with the intention of exposing life in “the Church” – the cult I became part of. There’s plenty of information online about the Jim Roberts Group, but nothing as personal or as revealing as my story. I wanted to share some of the testimonies that surprised and wowed me on that long, strange journey.

My decade in the group radically changed me. It was not a fun, easy 10 years, but it sure was an interesting time. I married a man I hardly knew. I learned more than any university could have taught me. I acquired vital survival skills.

I lived out of a back pack I made myself. We gleaned all the fabric, zips, webbing and buckles for it from factory dumpsters and made designer gear like the camping shops sell. I felt like a fashionable baglady! Not only did we find stuff for camping gear in dumpsters, we found our food there too. Today this is now a hip trend called Freeganism. But we were the originals.

I had all three of my children at home in the cult. I discuss real women’s issues like birth, miscarriage, rape and abortion. I write about the complex inner workings of the church from a married sister’s point of view.

My story, though, is one of hope, forgiveness and healing.

I used the letters I had written to my mom as the skeleton of my book. They helped jog my memory. Memories are such elusive things: hiding, tucked away in the recesses of our mind, lurking in the background and waiting to be brought into the light.

I believe our testimonies are powerful and can help save us from ourselves if we choose to remember them and learn the valuable lessons they are meant to teach us.

Book details


» read article

Redakteur van Taalgenoot deel sy 10 gunsteling-boeke

Johan Jack Smith, die redakteur van Taalgenoot, het onlangs geskryf dat hy deesdae baie meer waardering het vir boeke wat hy destyds op skool gelees het, en hoe sy voorliefde vir lees deur R.R. Ryger se Beertjie en sy Boytjies geprikkel is.

Vandag kyk ek anders na Kringe in ’n Bos, Fiela se Kind en Die jaar toe my ma begin sing het. Ek het meer waardering. Maar as tiener was ek keelvol vir tragiese verhale, diere wat uitsterf en die hartseer en foltering van die Afrikaner. Dit het my nie oortuig om vakansietye televisie, video’s en videospeletjies vir ’n boek op te gee nie.

Smith is tot vandag toe nog ‘n groot liefhebber van Afrikaanse letterkunde, maar hy voeg by dat hy ook maar probeer om meer Engels te lees.

Klik hier vir Smith se lys van top 10 gunsteling boeke, hoekom dit ietwat moeilik is om vir ‘n peuter aan boeke te voorstel, en hoe ‘n naweek wat hy in die hospitaal moes deurbring hom aan’t die lees gekry het…
 

Beertjie en sy Boytjies

 
 
 

Fiela se KindBook details

 
 
 
Kringe in 'n Bos

 
 
 

Die jaar toe my ma begin sing het


» read article

Antjie Krog bekroon met Hertzogprys


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Die Raad van die Suid-Afrikaanse Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns het onlangs die bekronings vir hul jaarlikse toekennings aan diegene wat ‘n besonderse bydra tot die wetenskap, tegnologie en kunste in Afrikaans gelewer het aangekondig.

Dié raad is ‘n organisasie wat hom beywer vir die bevordering van wetenskap, tegnologie en die kunste, as ook om die belange van Afrikaans te dien.

Die Hertzogprys

Die stigting van die Raad van Suid-Afrikaanse Akademie word aan generaal J.B.M. Hertzog toegeskryf; ‘n voorstander vir Afrikaans-Nederlands. Die gesogte Hertzogprys vir letterkunde is na die generaal vernoem en staan vandag nog bekend as die vernaamste prestigeprys in die Afrikaanse letterkunde.

Die Hertzogprys is vanjaar toegeken aan die gerekende skrywer en digter Antjie Krog vir haar bundel Mede-wete.

Eugène Maraisprys

Die Eugène Maraisprys word toegeken vir ‘n eerste of vroeë letterkundige werk. Die skrywer wat vir sy of haar werk vereer word, kan slegs een maal dié toekenning ontvang.

Eugène Maraisprys 2015: Lien Botha is die 2015 Eugène Maraisprys toegeken vir haar roman Wonderboom. Slegs boeke wat in 2015 verskyn het, is in aanmerking geneem vir hierdie besonderse toekenning.

Eugène Maraisprys 2016: Amy Jephta is toegeken vir haar drama, Kristalvlakte wat in 2016 verskyn het en Bibi Slippers is ook vereer vir haar 2016 debuut-digbundel, Fotostaatmasjien.

Die bekroondes sal hul pryse onderskeidelik in Stellenbosch (Woensdag 21 Junie) en Pretoria (Vrydag 29 September) ontvang.

Mede-wete

Book details

 

Wonderboom

 
 

Kristalvlakte

 
 
 

Fotostaatmasjien


» read article

Seven books to read in the light of Pravin Gordhan’s dismissal

President Jacob Zuma’s dismissal of Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan on 30 March 2017 has been met with opposition from South African politicians and citizens alike.

The following seven books serve as recommended background reading on South Africa’s socio-political history, including its state of affairs since Zuma’s presidency:

South Africa's Corporatised Liberation South Africa’s Corporatised Liberation
Dale T. McKinley
South Africa’s democracy is in trouble. The present situation is, in objective terms, a house divided; a house that is tottering on rotten foundations. Despite the more general advances that have been made under the ANC’s rule since 1994, power has not only remained in the hands of a small minority but has increasingly been exercised in service to capital. The ANC has become the key political vehicle – in party and state form as well as application – of corporate capital: domestic and international, black and white, local and national, and constitutive of a range of different fractions. As a result, ‘transformation’ has largely taken the form of acceptance of, combined with incorporation into, the capitalist ‘house’, now minus its formal apartheid frame.

What has happened in South Africa over the last 22 years is the corporatisation of liberation, the political and economic commodification of the ANC and societal development. Those in positions of leadership and power within the ANC have allowed themselves to be lured by the siren calls of power and money, to be sucked in by the prize of ‘capturing’ institutional sites of power, to be seduced by the egoism and lifestyles of the capitalist elite.

This book tells that ‘story’ by offering a critical, fact-based and actively informed holistic analysis of the ANC in power, as a means to: better explain and understand the ANC and its politics as well as South Africa’s post-1994 trajectory; contribute to renewed discussion and debate about power and democracy; and help identify possible sign-posts to reclaim revolutionary, universalist and humanist values as part of the individual and collective struggle for the systemic change South Africa’s democracy needs.

Policy, Politics and Poverty in South AfricaPolicy, Politics and Poverty in South Africa
Jeremy Seekings & Nicoli Nattrass
Along with inequality and unemployment, poverty is seen as South Africa’s biggest challenge with over half of South Africans living below the national poverty line. Poverty is arguably the most pressing social, economic and political problem faced in South Africa. When South Africa finally held its first democratic elections in 1994, the country had a much higher poverty rate than in other countries at a similar level of development. While the exclusion of the poor occurs in very many countries, in South Africa it has a distinctive extra dimension. Here, poverty has been profoundly racialised by law, by social practice, and by prejudice. This was the legacy of apartheid. Over twenty years later, poverty is still widespread. Poverty, Politics & Policy in South Africa explains why poverty has persisted in South Africa since 1994.

In the book, authors Jeremy Seekings and Nicoli Nattrass demonstrate who has and who has not remained poor, how public policies both mitigated and reproduced poverty, and how and why these policies were adopted. Their analysis of the South African welfare state, labour market policies and the growth path of the South African economy challenges conventional accounts that focus only on ‘neoliberalism’. They argue, instead, that the ANC government’s policies have been, in important respects, social democratic.

The book shows how social-democratic policies both mitigate and reproduce poverty in countries like South Africa, reflecting the contradictory nature of social democracy in the global South.

Dead President WalkingDead President Walking
Zapiro

Zapiro comes of age in this 21st annual. Zuma once again takes centre stage for all the wrong reasons along with his cronies the Guptas and his nemesis Malema. It’s the year of the hashtag. #RhodesMustFall begat #FeesMustFall, also #Racism/#Sexism and #ZumaMustFall. With Nenegate and SARS wars, it’s the rand that’s really falling. Meanwhile, Pravin and Thuli fight the good fight.

Each cartoon is worth a thousand words and helps us make sense of our crazy, beautiful country where fact is indeed stranger than fiction.
 
 

How Long will South Africa Survive? How Long will South Africa Survive?
RW Johnson

In 1977, RW Johnson’s best-selling How Long Will South Africa Survive? provided a controversial and highly original analysis of the survival prospects of apartheid. Now, after more than twenty years of ANC rule, he believes the situation has become so critical that the question must be posed again.
‘The big question about ANC rule’, he writes, ‘is whether African nationalism would be able to cope with the challenges of running a modern industrial economy. Twenty years of ANC rule have shown conclusively that the party is hopelessly ill-equipped for this task. Indeed, everything suggests that South Africa under the ANC is fast slipping backward and that even the survival of South Africa as a unitary state cannot be taken for granted. The fundamental reason why the question of regime change has to be posed is that it is now clear that South Africa can either choose to have an ANC government or it can have a modern industrial economy. It cannot have both.’ Johnson’s analysis is strikingly original and cogently argued. He has for several decades now been the senior international commentator on South African affairs, known for his lucid analysis and complete lack of deference towards the conventional wisdom. (Also available as an eBook.)

Goodnight Zzzuma! Goodnight Zzzuma
Anonymous

Tucked up in bed, President Zuma says goodnight to all the familiar things in his softly lit world. Goodnight to the pictures of his favourite wives, to the Gupta brothers and to the helipad at Nkandla. To everything, one by one, he says goodnight.
Generations of children have been lulled to sleep with Margaret Wise Brown’s and illustrator Clement Hurd’s classic bedtime story Goodnight Moon. In 2008, Little Brown US published the New York Times bestseller, Goodnight Bush. It became a runaway bestseller and viral sensation. In 2009 Bush left office. Now it is our turn, with Goodnight Zzzuma! A must-read for anyone still possessing a sense of outrage.

Clever Blacks, Jesus and NkandlaClever Blacks, Jesus and Nkandla
Gareth van Onselen

Gareth van Onselen has put together a comprehensive collection of Zuma’s most controversial – and often contradictory – public statements. With some 350 quotes collected along ten themes that define Zuma’s personal beliefs, Clever Blacks, Jesus and Nkandla documents some of Zuma’s most notorious moments. It aims to serve as both an easy guide to Zuma’s personal philosophy and a reference point for some of the debates that have defined his political career. The quotes represent one of the fundamental fault lines that run through South African discourse today – a society trapped between its Third World realities and its much-vaunted First World ambitions. In many ways, Zuma is the epicentre around which the subsequent debate has unfolded. (Also available as an eBook.)
 
 
 

When Zuma GoesWhen Zuma Goes
Ralph Mathekga

South Africa has been in the grip of the ‘Zunami’ since May 2009: Scandal, corruption and allegations of state capture have become synonymous with the Zuma era, leaving the country and its people disheartened. But Jacob Zuma’s time is running out. What impact will his departure have on South Africa, its people and on the ruling party? Can we fix the damage, and how? Ralph Mathekga answers these questions and more as he puts Zuma’s leadership, and what will come after, in the spotlight.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Book details


» read article

Jacket Notes: “In this man we are offered a cracked-mirror version of ourselves as a nation” – Ralph Mathekga on When Zuma Goes

Published in the Sunday Times

 

When Zuma GoesWhen Zuma Goes
Ralph Mathekga (Tafelberg)

South Africa’s democracy counts among the most celebrated world experiences since the collapse of the Soviet Union in the ’90s. Just over two decades later, it’s interesting to observe how we South Africans have been relating to our democracy. This inspired me to write When Zuma Goes, which I have been working on since 2007.

I’m fascinated by the complexity of South African society. The majority of people are conservative — across racial lines. Our constitution, however, is one of the most progressive when it comes to the protection of human rights. South Africans have thus far improvised and reoriented themselves to co-exist in a system of law that challenges their orthodox predisposition.

We are stranded in the middle of democracy and we have to keep on pushing forward, embracing the values that come with the democratic system, despite our misgivings and occasional frustrations with it. As a nation, we are reluctant democrats, to some degree. We embrace democracy when it favours us, and at times show half-hearted commitment when it comes to uncomfortable issues such as transformation, affirmative action, abortion, and same-sex relationships.

What I find curious about South Africans is that we love being politically correct – until it’s brought to our doorstep. We like to declare our commitment to racial harmony, towards transformation, until we are personally affected. This is when we stick our heads back in the sand. But there is one man who is consistent and open about his beliefs.

This is the man who openly expresses his frustrations with democracy and never holds back. In this man we are offered a cracked-mirror version of ourselves as a nation. It is in this man that we are faced with that uncomfortable part of us. This is the man whose political leadership since 2007 has got me thinking: what if we are just sophisticated versions of Jacob Zuma? This is man on whose leadership I decided to anchor my book; where I aim to reflect on us as a nation and how we relate to institutions of democracy and its value system.

As I write these lines, it’s 3am. This is the time I always wake up and say to myself: “Now you are Jacob Zuma. Think like him and try to find logic in his methods.” I hope my book brings out a kind of logic as a way to reflect on this great nation.

Book details


» read article

Lank verwagte Eindspel tref die rakke

Eindspel

Aanhangers van Wilna Adriaanse se immgergewilde Dubbelspel (2014) kan al die dae begin aftel tot hulle weer met Ellie McKenna kennis maak.

In Eindspel word die leser weer aan Ellie voorgestel, wat deesdae ‘n salige bestaan op die platteland maak. Sy help selfs uit as kerkorrelis en geniet die alledaagse lewe.

Tog bly die nimmereindigende soektog na haar pa se moordenaar by haar spook.

Een Sondag stap twee vreemde mans by die kerk in en Ellie weet met die eerste oogopslag dat hulle opsoek is na haar…

Berei jou voor vir ‘n boeiende spanningsverhaal soos net Adriaanse kan!

Book details


» read article