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Archive for the ‘Zebra’ Category

Casterbridge Lifestyle Centre to again host the Lowveld Book Festival

Due to the success of the inaugural Lowveld Book Festival last year, the festival will once more take place at Casterbridge Lifestyle Centre in White River, Mpumalanga, from 18 to 20 August 2017.

The Lowveld is not only home to many of South Africa’s literary talents, but is also the setting for a vast array of books and poems.

The response from publishers, authors and visitors was overwhelmingly positive last year, and this year visitors can look forward to a host of interesting authors, including Karina Szcuzurek (The Fifth Mrs Brink), Tony Park, Adam Cruise, Athol Williams, Bridget Hilton-Barber, Elaine Pillay, Tracy Todd, Mercy Dube, Mario Cesare, Jayne Bauling, Derick van der Walt, DJ Sbu and Isabella Morris to name a few, as well as a socio-political discussion, various workshops and poetry readings.

Tony Park
Tony is the author of 13 novels, set in Africa, and six biographies. His 14th novel, The Cull, about an elite anti-poaching squad, is due for release in October 2017.

Adam Cruise
Adam is a conservation and travel writer, who works for a variety of magazines and newspapers. His books include the well-received Louis Botha’s War in 2015 and In the Pursuit of Solitude (2012). Adam has just moved back to South Africa, to Sabie, after spending a few years writing and indulging in the Mediterranean culture on the French Riviera.

Athol Williams
Athol is an award-winning poet and social philosopher. He is the author of Pushing Boulders: Oppressed to Inspired, which tells of his journey from poverty to earning master’s degrees from five of the world’s top universities including Harvard, Oxford and LSE. He is the only person to be awarded the Sol Plaatje EU Poetry Award twice, was a winner of a poetry prize at Oxford, and was a runner-up for the 2016 SA Literary Award for Poetry. He has published three books of poetry and is the author of the Oaky series of children’s books. He is currently a doctoral candidate Oxford University.

Bridget Hilton-Barber
Bridget’s colourful career in the media spans more than two decades. Former travel correspondent for Radio 702 and former editor of South African Airways’ (SAA) magazine Sawubona, she is best known for her wild and wacky travel writing and books. Her first memoir, Garden of My Ancestors was a bestseller. Now in her ninth book, a political memoir, Bridget takes you on a poignant journey back to her life as a student activist in the final days of apartheid in the mid 80s where she was betrayed by a police spy and ended up in jail.

Elaine Pillay
Elaine has written academic books and short stories. Zwai and the Little Creature is her first children’s book. In March 2017, she represented South Africa in Fiji Islands at the Centennial Celebration of the Abolition of Indentured Labour in Fiji.

Mario Cesare
Mario’s career has taken him from Timbavati and Mala Mala to Olifants River. His memoir – Man-eaters, Mambas and Marula Madness – provides a wealth of lessons on conservation and stories of life in the bush, as it is enjoyed only by those fortunate enough to live on a Big Five reserve.

More recently, Mario wrote The Man with the Black Dog, a touching story of a man and his faithful canine companion. With a naturalist’s eye for detail and the bigger picture of managing a fragile ecosystem through years of drought and plenty, Mario brings a storyteller’s delight – and a dash of Italian passion – to sharing his world.

Jayne Bauling
Jayne’s 25th book will be published during 2017 – Game Plan, the third novel in her Soccer Season trilogy for Cover2Cover Books. Her first 17 novels were romances, published by Mills & Boon in the UK, and translated into over 20 languages. In recent years, her focus has been on writing for youth. Her YA novels have been awarded the Macmillan Writers Prize for Africa, the Sanlam Gold Prize for Youth Literature and the Maskew Miller Longman Literature Award. One of them, Dreaming of Light (NB Publishers), was chosen to represent South Africa on the 2014 IBBY Honour List, and was also shortlisted for the Media24 M.E.R Prize for best youth novel. Two of her novels have been DBE-approved as high school set-works. Her short stories for adults and youth have been published in a number of anthologies and literary journals, and two have been shortlisted for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, while she has twice had stories for younger children shortlisted for the Golden Baobab prize. She has won poetry prizes from SAfm Radio and People Opposing Women Abuse. She also writes stories for FunDza Literacy Trust. A former Johannesburger, Bauling now lives in White River, Mpumalanga.

A bumper programme

The organisers’ goal is to reach out to the surrounding rural schools and expose children to the joy of stories and reading; to encourage teenagers to read more, whether electronic or printed books; and to support local writers and illustrators through workshops hosted by published authors.

“We hope to draw visitors and well-known authors from across the country to White River and introduce them to the creative talent resident here, as well as to motivate local authors and artists by uncovering their work and exposing them to a wider world of literature,” explains Louis van der Merwe, Chairman of the Lowveld Book Festival.

A balanced programme is promised, with the inclusion of poetry, folklore, workshops, storytelling and story-time for youngsters, panel discussions, historical Lowveld literature, interviews with authors, YA literature, performing art and a book fair.

South African authors will be selling and autographing their latest publications and authors will be slotted into events to ensure interesting discussions that grapple with the issues confronting South African literature and reading.

The Lowveld Book Festival is a multi-cultural event that will encourage a love of reading and acknowledge the role played by writers and poets in society, and we seek financial partners who embrace this important objective.

The full programme and information about ticket sales will be available from mid-June at www.lowveldbookfestival.co.za. For more information, follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or email lowveldbookfestival@gmail.com.

The Fifth Mrs Brink

Book details

 
 
 

Louis Botha's War

 
 
 

In the Pursuit of Solitude

 
 
 

Pushing Boulders

 
 
 

Garden of My Ancestors

 
 
 

Man-eaters, Mambas and Marula Madness

 
 
 

Dreaming of Light


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Shortlist for Short Sharp Stories Awards announced

The shortlist for the Short.Sharp.Stories Awards has been announced.

The Short.Sharp.Stories Awards is an annual short story competition made possible by the National Arts Festival.

This year’s theme is “Trade Secrets.”

The judges have focused in the main on how successfully the story speaks to the brief, and have chosen stories which showcase a range of South African ‘voices’.

Congratulations to the following writers whose stories will be included in Trade Secrets and who are on the short list for this year’s awards.

2017 Short Sharp Stories Awards shortlist:

Olufemi Agunbiade
Darrel Bristow-Bovey
Jumani Clarke
Linda Daniels
Frieda-Marie De Jager
Ntsika Gogwana
Amy Heydenrych
Mishka Hoosen
Bobby Jordan
Sean Mayne
Mapule Mohulatsi
Sally Anne Murray
Kamil Naicker
Sally Partridge
Pravasan Pillay
Megan Ross
Andrew Salomon
Stephen Symons
Philisiwe Twijnstra
Philip Vermaas
Michael Yee

Trade Secrets will be published in June/July.

One Midlife Crisis and a Speedo

Book details

 

Call it a Difficult Night

 
 
 

Sharp Edges

 
 
 

Tokoloshe Song

 
 
 

Questions for the Sea

 


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2016 Bloody Book Week crime fiction festival – programme revealed

2016 Bloody Book Week crime fiction festival - programme revealed
The Sunday Times Big Pub Quiz BookDark ForcesA Time Of Torment
DominionRecipes for Love and Murder: A Tannie Maria MysteryCold Case ConfessionThe Griekwastad MurdersA Citizen's Guide To Crime Trends In South Africa

 
Alert! The programme for the 2016 Bloody Book Week has been released, including international authors Stephen Leather, John Connolly and Jennifer Ridyard as well as local luminaries Sally Andrew, Alex Eliseev, Jacques Steenkamp, Anine Kriegler and Larry Benjamin.

The festival, which focuses on crime fiction and is organised by Jenny Crwys-Williams’s company Jenny & Co, will take place from Thursday, 28 July to Sunday, 31 July in venues around Johannesburg.

Check out the programme:

THURSDAY 28 JULY 2016

The Bloody Crime Quiz with Quiz Master Larry Benjamin

We test your knowledge of all things criminal. Crime cases, crime books, crime writers and of course, Jack Reacher! And Sally Andrews, author of Recipes for Love and Murder. Come have some fun.

Where: Stanley Beer Yard, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 6:30 for 7 PM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 long: 28.001041
Cost: R250 pp (price includes a prego roll and a glass of wine)
Bookings: bookings@jennyandco.co.za

* * * * *

FRIDAY 29 JULY 2016

The Boys’ Own Breakfast with Stephen Leather chatting to Ben Williams

Be among the first in South Africa to read Stephen Leather’s latest book, Dark Forces.

Where: The Social Kitchen, Exclusive Books, Hyde Park
Time: 7 – 9 AM
Bookings: For Fanatics members only. To get a free seat, check correspondence from Fanatics and click to enter the draw ASAP.

* * * * *

The Girls’ Own Roedean Breakfast with John Connolly

Where: Roedean Senior School Library, Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown
Time: 7:15 for 7:30 AM
GPS: lat: -26.1779935 long: 28.0476069
Cost: R120 pp
Bookings: For old girls only. 011 647 3203 or SAORA@roedeanschool.co.za

* * * * *

The Teenagers’ Own Adventure Time with John Connolly & Jennifer Ridyard

Where: The Auditorium, Roedean Senior School, Princess of Wales Terrace, Parktown
Time: 10:45 – 11:50 AM
Bookings: For senior school pupils only

* * * * *

Veldskoene, Tannie Maria & Death on Route 62 with Sally Andrew

A first novel that wormed its way instantaneously into all our hearts – plus one of Tannie Maria’s best cakes!

Where: Delta Cafe, 20 Marlborough Road, Craighall Park
Time: 10 for 10:30 AM
Cost: R205 pp
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

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Cold Case Justice with Alex Eliseev

Cocktails, canapes and readings from an extraordinary case.

Where: The Lobby, 54 on Bath, Rosebank
Time: 6 for 6:30 PM
Cost: R150 pp
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

Music & Murder with John Connolly & music man Charles Leonard

A unique evening of murderous music and tales.

Where: Stanley Beer Yard, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 5:30 – 7:30 PM, after which the public can join in!
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R195 pp (includes welcome drink)
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

SATURDAY 30 JULY 2016

In Their Own Words with Alex Eliseev

The cold case of the century through the words of the protagonists.

Where: JoziHub, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 10 – 11 AM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R90 pp (does not include drinks)
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

Konfyt and Murder with Sally Andrew & Andre Croucamp

In which author Sally Andrew is quizzed by delicious dress designer Andre Croucamp on veldskoene, dressing down and much, much more!

Where: Bean There Coffee Company, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 10 – 11 AM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R115 pp (does not include drinks)
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

Fresh Blood: Past, Present and Future with John Connolly

Raconteur and writer John Connolly talks crime fiction across the decades with Jenny Crwys-Williams.

Where: Antiques & Heritage of Europe, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 10 – 11 AM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R115 pp (does not include drinks)
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

Mind Over Murder with police forensic psychologist Gerard Labuschagne, Jacques Steenkamp and joint author of A Citizen’s Guide to Crime Trends in South Africa Anine Kriegler

Three experts in their field discuss crime SA-style.

Where: JoziHub, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R90 pp
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

In Conversation: Jenny Crwys-Williams engages with Stephen Leather: his life, his adventures, his books, and all …

Will Stephen Leather tell all to Jenny Crwys-Williams?

Where: Antiques & Heritage of Europe, 44 Stanley Precinct, Milpark
Time: 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R115 pp
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

A Winter’s Tale … Dinner with John Connolly and Writers Write

Where: The Bowery, 3 Sandown Valley Crescent, Sandton
Time: 6 for 6:30 PM
Cost: R320 pp
Bookings: news@writerswrite.co.za

* * * * *

SUNDAY 31 JULY 2016

The Killer Lunch: A Murderous Mix

Fancy having one of SA’s hottest crime writers at your table? Join Jenny Crwys-Williams and forensic psychologist Gerard Labuschagne plus eight authors in celebrating the world’s most popular literary genre: crime writing.

Where: Il Giardino, Stanley precinct, Milpark
Time: 12:30 for 1 PM
GPS: lat: -26.202209 – long: 28.001041
Cost: R480 pp
Bookings: www.webtickets.co.za

* * * * *

Book details


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Ahmed Kathrada calls for President Jacob Zuma to resign

Ahmed Kathrada, former political prisoner and anti-apartheid activist, author and living political legend, has written an open letter to President Jacob Zuma.

In the letter, Kathrada describes himself as a “loyal and disciplined member of the ANC and broader Congress movement since the 1940s”, loathe to speak out publicly “about any differences I may harbour against my leaders and my organisation, the ANC”.

However, Kathrada adds: “Today I have decided to break with that tradition.”

The final words of the letter are: “Today I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign.”

Read the letter in full:

Dear Comrade President Zuma

I have agonised for a while before writing this letter to you.

I am just a rank-and-file member of my ANC Branch. However, even before the ANC opened its membership to non-Africans in the 1969. I was involved in the activities of the ANC, the South African Indian Congress, the SACP and Umkhonto we Sizwe.

-In the Defiance Campaign Trial of 1952, I was among the 20 accused who were sentenced to 9 months imprisonment, suspended for 2 years.

-In the Treason Trial- 1956-1961. Of the original 156 accused, I was among the last 30 who were finally acquitted in 1961.

-In the 1963-1964 Rivonia Trial I was among the 8 accused sentenced to Life Imprisonment. Together with Comrade Walter Sisulu and others I was released in 1989. Comrade Madiba was released about 4 months later.

I am immensely grateful to the ANC for the privilege of serving on the first NEC after its unbanning. In 1997, I stepped down. I also benefited from the experience of serving for one term as Parliamentary Counsellor to President Mandela, after which I stepped down.

I am of course aware that this does not automatically bestow on me the right to address this letter to the President.

However, in all these years it never occurred to me that the time would come when I would feel obliged to express my concerns to the Honourable President. It is, therefore, painful for me to write this letter to you. I have been a loyal and disciplined member of the ANC and broader Congress movement since the 1940s.

I have always maintained a position of not speaking out publicly about any differences I may harbour against my leaders and my organisation, the ANC. I would only have done so when I thought that some important organisational matters compel me to raise my concerns.

Today I have decided to break with that tradition.

The position of President is one that must at all times unite this country behind a vision and programme that seeks to make tomorrow a better day than today for all South Africans. It is a position that requires the respect of all South Africans, which of course must be earned at all times.

I did not speak out against Nkandla although I thought it wrong to have spent public money for any President’s private comfort. I did not speak out though I felt it grossly insulting when my President is called a “thief” or a “rapist”; or when he is accused of being “under the influence of the Guptas”. I believed that the NEC would have dealt with this as the collective leadership of the ANC.

When I learnt of the dismissal of Minister Nene and the speculated reasons for this I became very worried. I’m fully aware, it is accepted practice that the appointment and dismissal of Ministers is the prerogative of the President. This might be technically correct but in my view it is against the best traditions of our movement. My concern was amplified when it emerged that the Deputy Finance Minister reported that he was offered the Finance Minister post by members of the Gupta family. The people’s interest must at all times remain supreme.In this instance it was clearly not the case. The resultant crisis that the country was plunged into was clearly an indication that the removal of the Minister was not about the interests of the people.

The unanimous ruling of the Constitutional Court on the Nkandla matter has placed me in an introspective mode and I had to ask myself some very serious and difficult questions. Now that the court has found that the President failed to uphold, defend and respect the Constitution as the supreme law, how should I relate to my President?

If we are to continue to be guided by growing public opinion and the need to do the right thing, would he not seriously consider stepping down?

I am not a political analyst, but I am now driven to ask: “Dear Comrade President, don’t you think your continued stay as President will only serve to deepen the crisis of confidence in the government of the country?”

And bluntly, if not arrogantly; in the face of such persistently widespread criticism, condemnation and demand, is it asking too much to express the hope that you will choose the correct way that is gaining momentum, to consider stepping down?

If not, Comrade President, are you aware that your outstanding contribution to the liberation struggle stands to be severely tarnished if the remainder of your term as President continues to be dogged by crises and a growing public loss of confidence in the ANC and government as a whole.

I know that if I were in the President’s shoes, I would step down with immediate effect. I believe that is what would help the country to find its way out of a path that it never imagined it would be on, but one that it must move out of soon.

To paraphrase the famous MK slogan of the time, “There comes a time in the life of every nation when it must chose to submit or fight”. Today I appeal to our President to submit to the will of the people and resign.

Yours comradely

Ahmed M Kathrada – 31st March, 2016

Related news:

 

Selected books by Ahmed Kathrada:

MandelaA Simple FreedomNo Bread for MandelaMemoirsA Free Mind

Book details


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Jenny Crwys-Williams Reveals Her 2015 Book of the Year Shortlists

 
Jenny Crwys-Williams has announced the shortlists for her Book of the Year, in the categories Cookbooks, Fiction, Non-fiction and Coffee Table Books.

The overall winners will be announced on Saturday, 5 December, at the Jenny & Co Big Book Brunch.

One lucky winner, who accurately predicts the winning book at the brunch, will walk away with a hamper of all the books on the shortlist.

Crwys-Williams calls the list “a great guide to seriously enticing reads you might want to buy as Christmas gifts or, of course, to treat yourself”.

* * * * *

From Jenny & Co:

COOKBOOKS OF THE YEAR

The Simple Secrets To Cooking Everything BetterThe Simple Secrets to Cooking Everything Better by Matt Preston
Even if you wanted to, you couldn’t keep either Matt Preston or Aussie publishing down. Both are the real thing. I wish I could find a fault with this generously-sized book, but I can’t. Filled with quirky humour, excellent artwork and Matt’s own recipes, I would give this book to anyone filled with confidence that they’d thank me forever. And I love his double page cooking secrets which divide the book with witty common sense.
 
 
 
More Life's a Beach CottageMore Life’s a Beach Cottage by Neil Roake
By the time I finished paging through this book I was slavering for banana plantations, South Coast heat, dolphins, sand so hot you scream and the world’s most lethal Bloody Marys you will probably never recover from, as you run across it. This book is so deliciously chilled you will probably emigrate south.
 
 
 
My Kind Of FoodMy Kind of Food by John Torode
John Torode is another down to earth Aussie who’s made it seriously big on Masterchef UK. Here’s his rip on contemporary family classics culled from his Oz childhood and his London foodie experiences. This is so simple you will want to faint – but you won’t because someone else will step in and fill that void. Clean, straightforward, touched with the NOW, a perfect wedding to build a dream on or just keeping up with the direction modern food is taking.
 
 
 
Mariana's Country KitchenMariana’s Country Kitchen: Food Through the Seasons by Mariana Esterhuizen, photography by Stephen Inggs
One of my small discoveries was finding Stanford, closer to Hermanus than to anywhere else. Enchanting un-tarred streets and still relatively untouched by decor luvvies, this book is all about what food ought to be. Which is why people queue to get into her bistro, Mariana’s. Filled with Cape hospitality and organic love, this is wholesome heaven made even more blissful by Stephen Inggs’ “I want it NOW” photography.
 
 
Anna Peters' Year of Cooking DangerouslyAnna Peters’ Year of Cooking Dangerously by Kathryn White
No-one thinks this is a cookbook, but it is. Anna Peters loses her man and tries to cook her way back into his heart. From culinary disaster after disaster and love affair after love affair, Anna expands her culinary repertoire until even the simpletons among us could make love and a souffle at the same time. You’ve got to love this book.
 
 
 
 
 
 
FICTION BOOKS OF THE YEAR

What Will People SayWhat Will People Say? by Rehana Rossouw
A sure-fire short listed novel for next year’s Sunday Times Fiction Award. The year is 1986 and you can hear the music pumping. Apartheid was dying but it still bit as it walked alongside the poverty of the Cape Flats where the tumult of the revolution was in full swing. Ten years ago, Soweto was aflame. Now it is time for the first of many commemorations as families struggled to bring their children up decently in the midst of perfectly envisaged gang wars. I fell in love with Nadia David’s An Imperfect Blessing set in the same period in the same city – and I’ve fallen in love with this fine novel.
 
 
The ReactiveThe Reactive by Masande Ntshanga
If ever there was a generational book, it is this one. Up for prizes everywhere, not just in South Africa, Ntshanga is someone to watch. Set in Cape Town, a city that has lost its shimmer, filled with the young and drifting, drugs, urban decay – and yet, the links with past, more settled lives inexorably call. The book quivers with life, with prose that delights, with a story that is both poignant and intimate and infinitely memorable.
 
 
 
A Brief History of Seven KillingsA Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James
What is there to say that the Man Booker judges didn’t say about this simply extraordinary novel woven around an attempted assassination of Bob Marley? Almost too big (nearly 800 pages) to gulp down without pausing to consider what you have read, anyone turning the pages will delight in the lyricism of the language, the audacity of the plot and the delight in reading something that is an instant international classic. From now on, my conversations will begin with: “Yes, but have you read A Brief History of Seven Killings?”
 
 
The Dream HouseThe Dream House by Craig Higginson
Eschewing the Western Cape and giving us a break from the Karoo, Craig Higginson’s novel is set somewhere around Nottingham Road in the Midlands. Dark is falling, an old woman sits in her wheelchair as her farmhouse is disinterred ahead of her move to Durban. She listens intently as the kitchen door quietly opens. She shows no fear as a man walks into her sitting room, carrying a silent menace with him. So begins a beautifully crafted and immersing novel asking uneasy and provocative questions that insist on responses.
 
 
Up Against the NightUp Against The Night by Justin Cartwright
Justin Cartwright left South Africa for Europe 40 years ago but he comes back often enough to keep the pulse racing and for his novelist’s eye to examine what is happening here. Frank (like Cartwright) is descended from Piet Retief and like Cartwright returns to the country of his birth every now and again. He decides to take his new love to KwaZulu Natal to see if it ‘talks’ to him. In the meantime, and so acutely observed I was in stitches, Frank’s errant nephew, just escaped from the Scientologists in the US, returns asking for alms and family bonding. The result is a novel of great power, hilarious scenes and deadly descriptions of our democracy.
 
 
 
NON-FICTION BOOKS OF THE YEAR

Stoked!Stoked! by Chris Bertish
If ever there was a South African story of great endeavour, this is it. After all, this skinny Cape Town boy managed to win the Mavericks Big Wave Invitational surfing event without any sponsorship at all. Now he is famous not only in the surfing world but in the real one as well, inspiring not only the thousands of wannabe surfers but also people whose dreams are more modest and who surf alongside Chris and achieve in their own field. Beautifully written, this book will make your pulse race and then some!
 
 
On the MoveOn the Move by Oliver Sacks
As the neurologist, writer and Renaissance man, Oliver Sacks was dying, he continued to write, he continued to love and he continued to wring as much as he could out of every remaining second, questioning the way his brain was working, as he had done for most of his life. This is just a glory of a memoir and it reminds me inexorably of Christopher Hitchen’s last book, written almost entirely as he was dying and as irreverent as ever. On the Move has been described as “filled with his restless energy” but there is so much more to this touching and sometimes astonishing memoir that will linger with you – and with the stories of some of his patients.
 
 
Burchell's TravelsBurchell’s Travels by Susan Buchanan
What a rare plant this book is: filled with the drawings and paintings by one of South Africa’s most outstanding naturalists, William John Burchell. By the time his extraordinary four year journey through the Cape ended, he had covered 7 000 mostly unexplored terrain in his ox waggon filled with the impedimenta of science. He collected over 50 000 plant and animal specimens – but that is the least of this book which takes us back to an unspoiled country of extraordinary beauty. His paintings are so vivid it is almost possible to walk within them. This is a book to pour over and wonder.
 
 
Empire, War & Cricket in South AfricaEmpire, War and Cricket by Dean Allen
Little did Dean Allen know when he drove to Matjiesfontein for a short break that he would discover so many stories! He ended up writing a best selling book about a village built by a canny Scot, discovered once-famous cricket matches were played on the stony fields and, as he disinterred the past of the one-time health resort, that he would bring back to life of an era of high colonialism in this outpost of the Karoo where anything seemed possible for the settlers, even if history ended up by mostly bypassing everything they created here. Fascinating, and a really great read.
 
 
We Have Now Begun Our DescentWe Have Now Begun Our Descent by Justice Malala
Justice Malala has written veritable fury of a book, his anger almost tripping him up it is so powerful. Dissecting South Africa’s current plight, he spares no-one as he analyses the state of this nation and rips into the corruption he (and we) see all around him. Unlike so many books attempting to explain our politics, lack of vision and deplorable education, Malala ends his book with a paean of thanks to Thuli Madonsela and, in his last chapter, outlines how we could become again a respected and respectable modern nation. I found it breathlessly inspirational and quite terrifying.
 
 
COFFEE TABLE BOOKS OF THE YEAR

nullMozambique by Moira Forjaz
This photographic book spans a decade in the life of Mozambique (1975-1985) and Moira Forjaz, the photographer and observer, has brought that country to life,from forgotten Portuguese and Arab forts to fishermen bringing in their catch, from modest houses to the struggle as we catch glimpses of Graca Machel in khaki military gear to Ruth First, from troubadours and to lonely old men sipping their coffee in deserted cafes. It is a beautiful and sensitive memoir about a time in a near neighbour’s history in a time of revolution.
 
 
A City RefractedA City Refracted by Graeme Williams
Joburg as you’ve never seen it before, dreamscapes and shadows and colours, some glimpsed at the end of a long corridor or through a half open door. Beautifully produced, this is a unique and artistic depiction of a complex, energetic city where the buzz never stops.
 
 
 
 
365 Postcards for Ants365 Postcards by Lorraine Loots
Easily the most beautiful of this year’s crop of coffee table books is this very little jewel hiding behind a modest white cover which gives no hint of the magic which lies within. For 365 days Lorraine painted a miniature painting and here they all are: meerkats and beer, Cape buildings and bontebuck, picnic baskets and the Vredehoek quarry, malachite kingfishers imprisoned on the page but just waiting to fly – it is just a diamond from beginning to end. If ever there was a magical book this is it.
 
 
We are the ChampionsWe are the Champions: The Champion Trees of South Africa by Enrico & Erna Liebenberg
This is a truly wonderful photographic record of all of South Africa’s 75 Champion Trees – and you all know how much I adore trees! It is the first extensive and complete collection of full-tree photographs of the wonderful tree heritage of this country. Did you know The oldest known measured tree is 1,800 years old? Or that The oldest planted Oak tree is 300 years old?
This fantastic book includes Champions such as the Post Office Tree, The Slave Tree, the Ruth Fischer tree and Marriott’s Lane. A perfect gift for every tree-lover and conservationist, and anyone who believes in protecting South Africa’s natural heritage for future generations.
 
 
Ultimate Star WarsUltimate Star Wars by Ryder Windham and Patricia Barr, forward by Anthony Daniels
Who DOESN’T love Star Wars?? This is a luscious and comprehensively detailed book with an unparalleled selection of Star Wars information – planets, cities, characters, space vehicles, blasters – you name it, this book has got it. Packed full of facts, info and gorgeous photos from all 6 Star Wars movies – it’ll keep kids, boys, men and every Star Wars devotee on the planet engrossed for hours. The only drawback? I’ll have to start saving for the Episode VII reference book which is sure to follow. An utter delight, and worth every penny.

Ends

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The 2015 Mail and Guardian Literary Festival Programme

The 2015 Mail & Guardian Literary Festival 1-2 August, 2015

 
The annual Mail & Guardian Literary Festival will run from 1-2 August at the Turbine Hall in Newtown Johannesburg, as part of the 2015 South African Book Fair.

Have a look at this year’s programme:

The Arrogance of PowerOn the PostcolonyEducation, Economy and Society

Saturday August 1, 9.30am
Goodbye to all that: Decolonising culture and institutions

Panel: Xolela Mangcu, Achille Mbembe, Leigh-Ann Naidoo and Thaddeus Metz
Chair: Salim Vally

Capitalist CrusaderHow South Africa WorksBRICS: An Anti-Capitalist CritiqueRaising the Bar

Saturday August 1, 11.30am
It’s the economy, stupid!

Panel: Herman Mashaba, Greg Mills and Patrick Bond
Chair: Songezo Zibi

Race, Class and PowerThe Limits of Democratic Governance in South AfricaWhat Will People SayA Flawed FreedomSouth Africa's Suspended Revolution

Saturday August 1, 1.30pm
South Africa at a fork in the road

Panel: Steven Friedman, Louis Picard, Rehana Rossouw and John Saul
Chair: Adam Habib

The Joburg BookThe Origins of Non-racialism

Saturday August 1, 3.30pm
Future perfect: Transforming Jo’burg from apartheid city to a city for all

Panel: Nechama Brodie, David Everatt, Zayd Ebrahim and Rashid Seedat.
Chair: Zeblon Vilakazi

The Seed ThiefAskarinullAntjie Krog and the Post-Apartheid Public SphereDiary of a Guji GirlPlatinum

Sunday August 2, 9.30am
South African fiction publishing at 21: Gatekeeping or rainmaking?

Panel: Fourie Botha (Umuzi), Bridget Impey (Jacana), Thabiso Mahlape (The Black Bird), Debra Primo (UKZN Press) and David Robbins (Porcupine Press)
Chair: Bronwyn Law-Viljoen

Antjie Krog and the Arrogance of PowerThe<br />
Post-Apartheid Public SphereMagema Fuze21 at 21The ANC Women's League

Sunday August 2, 11.30am
Black and white in colour: Why race (still) matters

Panel: Anthea Garman, Lewis Gordon, Xolela Mangcu, Hlonipha Mokoena and Melanie Verwoerd
Chair: Shireen Hassim

Arctic SummerThe Texture of ShadowsWay Back HomeGreen Lion101 DetectivesBad Sex

Sunday August 2, 1.30pm
The South African novel at 21
Panel: Damon Galgut, Mandla Langa, Niq Mhlongo, Henrietta Rose-Innes and Ivan Vladislavic
Chair: Leon de Kock

Empire, War & Cricket in South AfricaArctic SummerDF Malan and the Rise of Afrikaner NationalismThe Texture of ShadowsStrange Pilgrimages

Sunday August 2, 3.30pm
The Monuments Men: Rewriting reputation – Rhodes, Malan, Mandela & EM Forster

Panel: Dean Allen, Damon Galgut, Lindie Koorts and Mandla Langa
Chair: Achmat Dangor
 

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Tickets are available at webtickets.co.za and at the door on the day.

Programmes for the M&G Literary Festival and the South African Book Fair are online: southafricanbookfair.co.za

*Note Raks Seakhoa will no longer chair the South African fiction publishing at 21: Gatekeeping or rainmaking? panel. It will now be chaired by Bronwyn Law-Viljoen.
 

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Article by Tim Noakes Pulled from British Journal of Sports Medicine

The Real Meal RevolutionTim Noakes chews the fatChallenging BeliefsLore of Running

 
It seems that wherever Tim Noakes is involved, controversy is sure to follow.

The latest news concerning the main man behind The Real Meal Revolution is that an article in which he argues that “eating carbohydrates, especially refined ones, explained the rise of obesity rather than a lack of exercise” has been removed from the British Journal of Sports Medicine, which stated: “The paper has been temporarily removed following an expression of concern.”

It was claimed that Noakes did not declare a conflict of interest – something that is expected in medical research.

Rand Daily Mail reported on the matter:

It appears the controversy is because Noakes did not declare a conflict of interest [his diet book] — a common practice in medical research.

Noakes has sold 150000 copies of his book Real Meal Revolution, promoting a low-carb lifestyle. But he has also published three other books, and one promotes exercise.

Noakes said on twitter that in 42 years of publishing he has never needed to declare his books.

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The 15 Best Local Book Covers of 2014

What makes a good book cover? Often covers that seem ugly are in fact cleverly designed to attract your eye, and sometimes covers that look beautiful do not stand out on the shelf. It’s a very tricky business. Nonetheless, we’ve chosen the 15 best local book covers from 2014 – “best” in this case simply meaning the covers we liked the most.

Have we left any out? It’s quite possible. Let us know in the comments, or on Facebook or Twitter.

London – Cape Town – JoburgLondon – Cape Town – Joburg by Zukiswa Wanner
Designer: Russell Stark
Book homepage
EAN: 9780795706301
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Half of One ThingHalf of One Thing by Zirk van den Berg
Designer: Michiel Botha
Book homepage
EAN: 9780143538622
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tales of the Metric SystemTales of the Metric System by Imraan Coovadia
Designer: Joey Hi-Fi
Book homepage
EAN: 9781415207239
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Antjie KrogAntjie Krog: An Ethics of Body and Otherness edited by Judith Lütge Coullie and Andries Visagie
Designer: Nicolene van Loggerenberg
Book homepage
EAN: 9781869142537
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A Man of Good HopeA Man of Good Hope by Jonny Steinberg
Designer: Russell Stark
Book homepage
EAN: 9781868424429
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Broken MonstersBroken Monsters by Lauren Beukes
Designer: Joey Hi-Fi
Book homepage
EAN: 9781415202005
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Chicken ThiefThe Chicken Thief by Fiona Leonard
Designer: Russell Stark
Book homepage
EAN: 9780143538554
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Memoirs of a Born FreeMemoirs of a Born Free: Reflections on the Rainbow Nation by Malaika Wa Azania
Designer: Russell Stark
Book homepage
EAN: 9781431410224
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The ThreeThe Three by Sarah Lotz
Designer: Ben Summers
Book homepage
EAN: 9781444770377
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Love Tastes Like StrawberriesLove Tastes Like Strawberries by Rosamund Haden
Designer: Marius Roux
Book homepage
EAN: 9780795706639
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Spiral House The Spiral House by Claire Robertson
Designer: Joey Hi-Fi
Book homepage
EAN: 9781415203842
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
To The Black Women We All KnewTo The Black Women We All Knew by Kholofelo Maenetsha
Designers: Artwork by Tammy Griffin, lettering by Jesse Breytenbach
Book homepage
EAN: 9781920590079
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Alphabet of BirdsThe Alphabet of Birds by SJ Naudé
Designer: Jacques Kaiser
Book homepage
EAN: 9781415207130
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The Ties That BindThe Ties That Bind by Praba Moodley
Designer: Russell Stark
Book homepage
EAN: 9780795706691
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SkoppensboerSkoppensboer by Duane Aslett
Designer: Mike Cruywagen
Book homepage
EAN: 9780795800863
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


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Book Dash at The Book Lounge Makes a Final Push for the Thundafund Campaign

Glynis Lloyd, Kathryn Torres and Alice ToichNicola Rijsdijk and Arthur Attwell

The idea of Book Dash start barely 10 months ago, but as at the time of this publication, some 22 children’s books have been published and more than R64 000 has been raised via the Thundafund Campaign – which has been extended to Christmas Eve – to ensure that these books get into the hands of the children who most need them.

Talking at the final fundraising bash held earlier this month at The Book Lounge, Arthur Attwell said, “When we started working on this project we believed that South African literacy organisations needed to be able to give more books away that were created locally, in local languages and at much lower prices.” He was joined in a fascinating discussion with editor, Glynis Lloyd, literacy advocate, Kathryn Torres, artist, Alice Toich and publishing professional Nicola Rijsdijk.

Arthur Attwell and AidanBook Dash LogoAttwell explained that his background in the publishing industry had given him insight into how the expenses of administration, overheads and infrastructure push up the prices of books.

Driving this project with him is Tarryn-Anne Anderson and Michelle Matthews. “We figured there were enough creative types in Cape Town, also the World Design Capital, to produce beautiful children’s books on volunteer time. We gathered volunteers together, first in a very small way,” he said.

The first (unofficial) Book Dash took place at their office with two teams, including the well known children’s author Helen Brain. Within just six hours, two teams had experimented with the model to investigate its viability. This was tremendous fun and offered the team useful insights into how to run a big event. In June, some 40 industry professionals gathered at the City of Cape Town Central Library to share their expertise as writers, illustrators, designers and editors.

“By the end of the day, there were 10 new books in the world that hadn’t been in existence before,” Attwell said. “An initial sponsorship enabled us to print and donate 750 copies of the first three books on Mandela Day to the Jireh early education centre. “It was the moment when we started handing those books to small children, some as young as two years old, the circle of production is closed. You realise just how incredible it is to be part of a movement of people volunteering their time to give books away.”

At that precise moment, his two-year-old son arrived waving a book. He climbed onto dad’s lap, anticipating a story. It is no coincidence that the logo on the back of each book is that of a father reading to a child. Inherent in the vision of the project is the deeply cherished hope that the battered institution of fatherhood might benefit from this inspired image.

Attwell continued: “Aidan’s a big reason that Book Dash exists. Watching him learn to read was the first time I saw the power books have to open children’s minds, to bring the world in close.”

After the success of the Jireh Centre giveaway more sponsorship arrived via Rock Girl. The second major Book Dash went ahead with the vision of creating biographies of inspiring African women, offering strong female role models to young boys and girls.

The tales of the lives of Basetsana Kumalo, Graça Machel, Zanele Situ, Phyllis Spira, Miriam Makeba, Wangari Maathai, Sindiwe Magona, Helen Martins, Dr James Barry and Albertina Sisulu Soon another 10 books telling South African women’s stories in an accessible and age-appropriate way had been created.

“Once we’d created all these beautiful books, we didn’t want them to live as PDFs on our website. They needed to be turned into books and given to children. We had to print a lot of books and the quickest way to print thousands of books was – again – to ask the community. We needed individuals to get behind a project that was close to their hearts,” Attwell said. This brought the project to the Thundafund crowd-funding campaign.

Nicola Rijsdijk spoke about volunteering. “As a professional in publishing, you’re often working alone. You believe in fiction, in the power of words, and you believe in empathy that a reader derives from a text, but often you’re alone. Sitting in a group of people collaborating together, the creative energy is fantastic.” Alice Toich echoed her sensibilities and said, “It didn’t take long for Tarryn to persuade me. When I thought back to my childhood and the books that I’d loved, I realised what a tragedy it would have been to grow up without them. It’s great to imagine you can influence a child’s experience of reading.”

Kathryn Torres is part of closing the circle of creation via The Shine Centre. “We’re going to ensure that even the youngest of children are going to own their own book,” she said. “It’s relatively easy to get hold of second-hand books, but for a child to hold a brand new book in their hands is much harder.” She said it was tremendously important that children had books in their home, that reading wasn’t merely something one did at school.

Team Book DashGlynis Lloyd said Book Dash made it easy to do service. “It’s a defined amount of time, 12 hours, and the results are fantastic. You feel like you’re producing a book. It’s challenging professionally, because it’s a very different way of looking at and exploring book production. It raises a lot of questions about how we make books in the industry.” This is a completely different kind of process possessing both advantages and disadvantages.

She highlighted how all aspects of a children’s book are important, the written text, the visuals and design. She said, “Those three things need to work together. In conventional publishing, because of the chronological way in which books are done, we often don’t get the opportunity to really consider how those things work together. Book Dash forces you to consider how the text works with the illustrations and with the design in a positive way.”

Attwell suggested that it was hardest on the day for the illustrator, who had to produce at least 12 images in 12 hours. Each book has 12 double page spreads to tell the story. Toich spoke about the “crazy” time constraints and how they shaped her sensibilities. “A major thing to remember during the 12 hours was to avoid getting stuck on minor details. Working in watercolour, I wanted it perfect. There are these whimsical mistakes that creep in. I try to remind myself that ‘progression is better than perfection’. Let’s get to the next point. Let’s keep this rolling. That’s the energy I tried to keep going.”

Rijsdijk recalled working with Karen Lilje on Kom Terug, Kat! who had a hard time finishing the illustrations on the day. “The text could only say so much but little in-jokes arrived via the illustrations. The fact that the cat had muddied the laundry was not what I had written,” she said. “I had been able to work ahead of time, writing the story, but it was such a privilege to work with the illustrator in the moment.”

Attwell said a real anxiety had been whether the process could truly produce books of quality. He put Torres on the spot and praised the standardised size of the books that would help young readers identify them as Book Dash books. She loved the visual humour of Kom Terug, Kat! and the precise amount of text on the page, suitable for a small child. She predicted that after the parents read these books to their children, they become books that children can read to themselves and then to one another. “Often children’s first readers are dry and droll. In all these books, the local flavour, the personalities – Miriam Makeba – the gentle language is balanced with humorous illustrations,” she said.

Lloyd articulated the challenges of the second Book Dash, where she guided teams writing the biographies, saying, “The writers needed to do their research, to be sure about their facts. The responsibility as editors was to make that due respect was paid to whomever was being written about.” Rijsdijk added her considerations: “Most of the volunteers have worked in this kind of intellectual medium where you have had to confront the ethics of putting something down on paper that will affect people, and change their perspectives. This influenced the quality of the work that was produced.”

Sloman expressed his excitement on how Book Dash aims to get children’s books into children’s hands, saying, “This project is incredibly important. Hearing participants talk about their experience and how fantastic that has been is testament to the brilliance of the project, as well as the people involved. The harder part is to see this thing grow ridiculously. I want to be sitting here in six or nine months times, hearing how you have distributed 50 000 books.”

Sloman asked, “How is that possible? You have many of the elements nailed down, in terms of the creative process and cutting out superfluous costs in the production line. Is this the next step trying to get big corporate involvement? Or will that screw it up? How do we make this explode?”

Attwell lies awake at night, pondering these questions. He recently registered Book Dash as a non-profit organisation which is already unlocking possibilities for fundraising. “We’re now working with Jill Ritchie of Papillon Press, who doesn’t usually take on small new organisations,” he said.

“Folk tend to step it up a notch when they’re volunteering,” he said. “Watching people work, there was a kind of determination in everyone’s eyes to get this right.”

For those who care about this country, this is something wonderful to celebrate. There are a whole lot of things going right here. Any and all support in the last few days of the Thundafund campaign will surely make a difference.

* * * * * * * * *

Liesl Jobson (@LieslJobson) tweeted live from the event using the hashtag #livebooks:


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Facebook gallery

 

Books by authors involved in Book Dash include:

I Don't Like ChocolatePrincess Talia and the DragonVets and Pets: Jamie and the Magic WhistleMa mère était une très belle femmeFeast, Famine and PotluckThe Parade

The Little Red HenThe Whole Food AlmanacSister-SisterCtrl Z my leweAdults Only

As jy 'n ster sien verskietKilling TimeRide the TortoiseEmbracing Digital

 

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Program vir die 2014 Prins Albert Leesfees met Francois Smith, Eldridge Jason en Daniel Hugo en nog (7 – 9 November)

 
Die Prins Albert Leesfees, tans in sy derde jaar, vind vanjaar plaas van 7 tot 9 November. Die 2014 Leesfees-program sluit beide Engelse en Afrikaanse skrywers in, asook spesiale lees-en-skryfprogramme vir skoliere. Die fees word die Vrydagaand amptelik geopen by die Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg waar die meeste geleenthede sal plaasvind.

Marlene Malan skryf in Die Hoorn dat die 2014 Prins Albert Leesfees die land se “topskrywers en talle veelbesproke boeke en onderwerpe gelok” het:

Dit sluit in Francois Smith, wie se Kamphoer onlangs gepubliseer is; asook Dennis Cruywagen met Brothers in War and Peace oor die bekende tweeling Constand en Abraham Viljoen; Thomas Mollett met Bloody Lies oor die onopgeloste en opspraakwekkende moord op Inge Lotz; Eldridge Jason met Gerook, wat handel oor bendes sowel as drank- en dwelmverslawing; Marthie Maré met Legkaart van jou gesig/ Your Face Puzzle oor die invloed van jou gelaatstrekke op jou persoonlikheid; Carol Campbell met Esther’s House, ’n roman oor die agterplaasbewoner Esther Gelderblom van Oudtshoorn; die volkekundige en kultuurkenner Mathilda Burden met haar boek Ou-Kaapse Meubels; Daniel Hugo met sy vertaling van die digbundel Die Roebaijat van Omar Khajjam; asook besprekings van onder meer die nuwe roman van Marguerite Poland, The Keeper, wat deur Hugo as Die Bewaker vertaal is.

 
Hier volg die voorlopige program vir die 2014 Prins Albert Leesfees:

ZitaGerookBrothers in War and PeaceSuurlemoen!KamphoerDie roebaijat van Omar KhajjamDie bewakerThe Keeper
'n Huis vir Ester Esther's HouseHeartfruitBlack ButterfliesBloody Lies
This Must be the PlaceOu-Kaapse Meubels – Studies in styleFinding My Own Way...to Happy Legkaart van jou gesigYour Face Puzzle

Vrydag, 7 November

  • Boeke gee jou vlerke
    Anzil Kulsen, Mia Oosthuizen en Eldridge Jason gesels met leerders van Hoërskool Zwartberg.
    The Showroom Theatre
    08:00 – 09:00 en 09:30 – 10:30
    Mia Oosthuizen en Anzil Kulsen gesels met Prins Albert Primêr-leerders in die St John’s Kerksaal
    11:00 – 12:00

Saterdag, 8 November

  • Boekgesprek
    Marthie Maré in gesprek met Marlene Malan
    Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg
    09:00 – 10:00
  • Gerook
    Met Eldridge Jason
    The Showroom Theatre
    10:00
  • Kamphoer
    Francois Smith bespreek sy roman.
    Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg
    12:00 – 13:00
  • Gesprek oor vertaling
    Met Daniel Hugo, Kirby van der Merwe en Frederik de Jager
    Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg
    15:30 – 16:30
  • Ou Kaapse Meubels
    Bekendstelling van Matilda Burden se boek, met Mary Anne Botha
    Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg
    17:00 – 18:00
  • Black Butterflies
    Paula van der Oest se Nederlandse film gebaseer op Black Butterflies, ’n vertaling van Ingrid Jonker se poësie
    The Showroom Theatre
    20:00

Sondag, 9 November

  • Bloody Lies
    Thomas Mollett in gesprek met Marlene Malan en Frederik de Jager
    Jans Rautenbach Schouwburg
    10:45 – 11:45
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Boekbesonderhede


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