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Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀ shortlisted for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction

The 28-year-old Nigerian author Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀ has become the fourth African writer to be shortlisted for the annual Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. Adébáyọ̀ has been nominated for her debut novel, Stay With Me, which was published to critical acclaim in March 2017.

Fellow African authors Fiona Melrose (Midwinter) and Yewande Omotoso (The Woman Next Door) were longlisted for the award.

Titles which appeared on the longlist include The Mare by Mary Gaitskill, The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry, and Barkskins by Annie Proulx.

“It has been a great privilege to Chair the Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction in a year which has proved exceptional for writing of both quality and originality,” said Tessa Ross, 2017 Chair of Judges. “It was therefore quite a challenge to whittle this fantastic longlist of 16 books down to only six… These were the six novels that stayed with all of us well beyond the final page.”

The other five novels shortlisted for the award are The Power by Naomi Alderman, The Dark Circle by Linda Grant, The Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan, First Love by Gwendoline Riley and Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien.

Read more on this prestigious award commemorating woman writers here.
 

Stay With Me

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2017 Barry Ronge Fiction Prize longlist

Published in the Sunday Times

 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Announcing the longlists for the most prestigious annual literary awards, the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize, in association with Porcupine Ridge.

This is the 17th edition of the Sunday Times fiction prize, named for Barry Ronge, the arts commentator who was one of the founders of our literary awards. The criteria stipulate that the winning novel should be one of “rare imagination and style … a tale so compelling as to become an enduring landmark of contemporary fiction”.

Nkosinathi Sithole was awarded the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize for his book, Hunger Eats a Man, published by Penguin Books. The winners of the 2017 Alan Paton Award and Barry Ronge Fiction Prize will each receive R100 000.

Read:

 

The Barry Ronge Fiction Prize Judges

Rehana Rossouw (chair) Rossouw has been a journalist for three decades and is a commissioning editor at Business Day. She has a masters degree in creative writing from the University of the Witwatersrand. She has taught journalism and creative writing at Wits, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Institute for the Advancement of Journalism. Her debut novel, What Will People Say?, was published by Jacana in 2015. It was shortlisted for the Etisalat Prize for African Fiction in 2015.
 
 
Africa Melane
Melane is the host of the Weekend Breakfast Show on CapeTalk. He is also an ambassador for LeadSA, an initiative of Primedia Broadcasting and Independent Newspapers. Melane studied accounting at the University of Cape Town and did articles at PwC. He then went on to teach a professional development course to first-year students in the faculty of health sciences at the University of Cape Town. Melane is the chairman of MODILA, a trust that offers educational programmes to provide training in design, innovation, entrepreneurship and art studies. He also serves on the board of Cape Town Opera, Africa’s premier opera company.
 
Kate Rogan
Rogan is the owner of Love Books, an independent book shop in Johannesburg. Rogan has a degree in English from the University of Cape Town and a post-graduate degree English (Hons) from Stellenbosch University, where she studied under Michiel Heyns. She started her working life as a copywriter at 702, then moved into publishing where she was a commissioning editor at Zebra Press in its early days. She moved back to radio as a producer and for many years produced The Book Show for Jenny Crwys-Williams. In 2009 she started Love Books.
 

Chairperson Rehana Rossouw remarks on the Barry Ronge Fiction Prize longlist:

“South African authors are spoiled for choice. Their local stories are stitched into a tapestry of a landscape ranging from tropical heat to dusty dorps. The longlist this year contains titles that weave the land and the people into compelling tales. Some authors deal with historical dispossession and despair; others discover the magic hidden in thick foliage and stark dustlands. All the authors examine the essence of a people propelled by a dream and led astray by dreamers — some with deft touches and others with scream-with-laughter satire. Crime remains a distinct theme but there’s always love; often sweet and sometimes twisted. It is going to be a struggle this year to choose one winner from a list that contains works by writers presenting their country in words that strike at the heart and linger on the synapses.”

Without further ado, the longlist (scroll down for titles):

Our Fathers
Our Fathers, Karin Brynard (Penguin Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Like It Matters
Like It Matters, David Cornwell (Umuzi)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Long Wave
The Long Wave, Tom Dreyer (Penguin Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The God Who Made MistakesThe God Who Made Mistakes, Ekow Duker (Picador Africa)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In the Maid's Room
In The Maid’s Room, Hagen Engler (Jacana Media)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Travels With My Father
Travels With my Father, Karen Jennings (Holland Park)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Printmaker
The Printmaker, Bronwyn Law-Viljoen (Umuzi)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nwelezelanga
Nwelezelanga: The Star Child, Unathi Magubeni (Blackbird Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Namaste Life
Namaste Life, Ishara Maharaj (Modjaji Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Yearning
The Yearning, Mohale Mashigo (Picador Africa)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Who Killed Piet Barol?
Who Killed Piet Barol?, Richard Mason (Orion)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Period Pain
Period Pain, Kopano Matlwa (Jacana Media)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Little Suns
Little Suns, Zakes Mda (Umuzi)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Midwinter
Midwinter, Fiona Melrose (Little, Brown)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pleasure
Pleasure, Nthikeng Mohlele (Picador Africa)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hamba Sugar Daddy
Hamba Sugar Daddy, Nape `a Motana (Jacana Media)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agents of the State
Agents of the State, Mike Nicol (Umuzi)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Woman Next Door
The Woman Next Door, Yewande Omotoso (Chatto & Windus)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Outside the Lines
Outside the Lines, Ameera Patel (Modjaji Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bone Meal for RosesBone Meal for Roses, Miranda Sherry (Head of Zeus)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Peculiars
The Peculiars, Jen Thorpe (Penguin Books)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
The Safest Place You KnowThe Safest Place You Know, Mark Winkler (Umuzi)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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2017 Alan Paton non-fiction longlist

Published in the Sunday Times


 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Announcing the longlists for the most prestigious annual literary awards, the Alan Paton Award for non-fiction, in association with Porcupine Ridge. The shortlists will be announced in May.

This is the 28th year the Alan Paton Award will be bestowed on a book that presents “the illumination of truthfulness, especially those forms of it that are new, delicate, unfashionable and fly in the face of power”, and that demonstrates “compassion, elegance of writing, and intellectual and moral integrity”.

This year’s Alan Paton Award judging panel is Pippa Green (chair), Tinyiko Maluleke and Johann Kriegler.

2017 Sunday Times Alan Paton Award Judges

Pippa Green (chair) Green is communications and media manager of the Research Project on Employment, Income Distribution and Inclusive Growth. Head of the journalism programme at the University of Pretoria from 2009 to 2014, she was educated at the University of Cape Town and Columbia University in New York City, where she earned an MSc in journalism. She is the author of Choice, not Fate: The Life and Times of Trevor Manuel (2008). Green is a recipient of many awards such as the Nieman Fellowship.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tinyiko Maluleke Maluleke serves as adviser to the principal and vice-chancellor at the University of Pretoria, and is an extraordinary professor at the University of South Africa. He has been a visiting professor at various universities, including Hamburg University in Germany and Duke University in the US. He is an elected member of the Academy of Science of South Africa, a columnist for the Mail & Guardian and Sunday Independent newspapers, and reviews books for the Sunday Times.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Johann Kriegler After 25 years at the bar and 20 on the bench, when Kriegler’s term as a Constitutional Court judge ended he looked forward to sitting on the stoep and catching up on all the books he’d missed out on. It didn’t work out like that. Having chaired the Independent Electoral Commission for the 1994 elections, he has been engaged by the African Union, the UN and a variety of NGOs in a range of electoral and judicial activities across the world. At home, arbitrations, advocacy training and his activities in human-rights and rule-of-law organisations occupy much of his time.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Chairperson Pippa Green’s remarks on the Alan Paton Award longlist:

There are 27 books on the longlist. This is more than usual but reflects the excellence and originality of many of the non-fiction books published in 2016. They include a number of memoirs, biographies and autobiographies, which tell the stories of intimate family relationships against a backdrop of the huge historical forces that have swept the last century. There are books about and by key public figures; there are those that focus on fascinating people who are not well known, such as stowaways, gangsters, police officers, miners, transgender people, and foot soldiers. There are important topics covered too: the history of the independent trade union movement, of science, of African languages, as well as key moments of disjuncture in our current society. The books raise critical questions about our past, present and future. Together they tell a story of our fractured and bound humanity, not only in South Africa but around the world and through time. — Pippa Green

Last year’s Alan Paton Award winner was Pumla Dineo Gqola for her book Rape: A South African Nightmare, published by MF Books Joburg. The winners of the 2017 Alan Paton Award and Barry Ronge Fiction Prize will each receive R100 000.

Read:

NIHSS Award winners to be announced tonight


The National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) Award winners will be announced on Wednesday 29 March 2017. The awards are aimed at recognising and awarding outstanding, innovative and socially responsible scholarship that enhance and advance the fields of Human Social Sciences. They are awarded for the best non-fiction monograph; the best edited non-fiction volume; the best fiction book; the best creative collections, and digital contributions category.

Wits University Press is proud of having 5 finalists in the shortlists for these awards, with two books shortlisted for the best Non-fiction monograph, namely Gabeba Baderoon’s Regarding Muslims: From slavery to post-apartheid, as well as Susan Booysen’s Dominance & Decline: The ANC in the Time of Zuma. In the category for best Non-fiction Edited Volume, Wits Press’s urban studies book, Changing Space, Changing City: Johannesburg after Apartheid, edited by Phil Harrison, Graeme Gotz, Alison Todes and Chris Wray is a finalist. And in the category for best Creative Collections in the Visual Arts, Wits Press boasts two finalists. They are Beadwork, Art and the Body – Dilo tse Dintsha/Abundance, edited by Anitra Nettleton, and a book on the work of the artist Penny Siopis, Penny Siopis: Time and Again, edited by Gerrit Olivier.

NIHSS CEO, Prof Sarah Mosoetsa said much work needs to be done to identify, support and promote new South African voices, authors and stories in the humanities and social sciences.

Wits University Press publisher, Veronica Klipp said she is pleased that South African scholarly publishing is receiving recognition through these awards. Apart from contributing to research and scholarship in the humanities and social sciences, it also stimulates public debate on a number of important issues and creates new forms of democratic spaces.

Mandla Maphumulo recipient of the PanSALB Award for Inhlamvu Yelanga

Mandla Abednego Maphumulo has won the PanSALB Award (2016-2017) in the Language and Literature Category (isiZulu) for his book Inhlamvu Yelanga, a collection of short stories in isiZulu.

This PanSALB Award recognises both the written and the oral modes of linguistic and/or literary expression. It is for individuals/writers who have contributed to the promotion and preservation of all the official South African languages i.e. Sesotho sa Leboa, Sesotho, Setswana, siSwati, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, Afrikaans, English, isiNdebele, isiXhosa and isiZulu, Khoi, Nama, San, as well as sign language.

Congratulations, Mandla!

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Jeff Opland awarded the Order of Ikhamanga: Silver for his contribution to history and South African literature

Jeff Opland has been awarded the Order of Ikhamanga: Silver for his outstanding contribution to the field of history and an impressive body of works in literature. The award read: “Your work exhumes stories of the dead and brings them to life so that the living can continue to learn and benefit.”

The Ikhamanga flower (more commonly referred to as the strelitzia, crane, or bird or paradise flower) is one of the world’s most recognisable flowers and is indigenous to the Eastern Cape. The Ikhamanga is the central motif of the Order of Ikhamanga and symbolises the unique beauty of the achievements of South Africans in the creative fields of arts, culture, literature, music, journalism and sport.

The Opland Collection of Xhosa Literature is the academic library of Jeff Opland assembled in the course of his research into Xhosa folklore, especially praise poetry, and the history of Xhosa literature. Its contents include field recordings of Xhosa poets (1969–85), books and pamphlets in isiXhosa, and copies of literature published in ephemera. The Publications Series draws on material in the Collection, and presents diplomatic editions with English translations of significant works in isiXhosa, for the most part previously unrecognised or unavailable as published books, and studies of material in the Collection.

The ceremony will be held at the Presidential Guest House on 28 April 2017.

John Solilo: Umoya wembongi

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