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Inskrywings vir die vierde US Woordfees-kortverhaalbundel word ingewag

Via die Woordfeeskantoor

Skrywers kan nou inskryf vir die vierde US Woordfees-kortverhaalbundel, wat by die 2019 Woordfees bekend gestel sal word. Du Toitskloof Wyne borg weer die prysgeld van R30 000 vir die wenverhaal. Een van die gepubliseerde verhale sal ook weer met die ondersteuning van kykNET vir die Silwerskermfees as kortfilm ontwikkel word.

“Die Woordfeeskortverhaalbundel se statuur het in die afgelope drie jaar tot dié van literêre instelling gegroei,” sê Saartjie Botha, direkteur van die US Woordfees. “Die hoeveelheid inskrywings groei jaarliks saam met die gehalte van die skryfwerk en die tematiese verskeidenheid in die verhale. Ons is opgewonde om te sien waarmee skrywers vir die 2019-bundel vorendag kom.”

Die skrywers wat in dié bundel opgeneem word, het in die verlede elkeen R4 000 vir hul verhale ontvang, maar danksy Du Toitskloof sal elkeen volgende jaar R5 000 in die sak steek.

“Sedert die verskyning van die eerste Woordfeesbundel in 2016 word van die beste kortverhale in Afrikaans op hierdie wyse gepubliseer,” sê die uitgewersredakteur en sameroeper van die kompetisie, Suzette Kotzé-Myburgh, wat sedert 2016 by dié projek betrokke is. “Die wedstryd het laas jaar gegroei tot ’n rekordgetal van 237 inskrywings, met stewige prysgeld sowel as ’n prestigeryke filmprys wat skrywers kan inpalm. As jy nog altyd jou hand aan ’n kortverhaal wou waag, is hierdie jou kans!”

Die 2018-wenner, Clari Niemand, se verhaal Non (kompos) mentis word in ’n kortfilm omskep wat by die 2018 Silwerskermfees vertoon sal word.

Oor Du Toitskloof Wyne se betrokkenheid sê Marius Louw, uitvoerende hoof, dat Du Toitskloof die jaarlikse Kortverhaalkompetisie as een van die kalenderjaar se hoogtepunte beskou: “Daar waar kreatiwiteit heers, wil ons graag betrokke bly, want só deel ons in die ontdekking van die skrywers se goud, skuur ons skouers met die kunste en blink ons saam agterna. Ons deelname as borg inspireer ons tot groter vindingrykheid in elke volgende avontuur wat ons aanpak.”

Skrywers wie se verhale in die bundel opgeneem gaan word, sal by die Woordfeesprogrambekendstelling in November 2018 bekend gemaak word. Die wenverhaal asook die verhaal wat vir ’n verwerking tot kortfilm gekies is, sal eers tydens die bekendstelling van die bundel, gedurende die Woordfees van 1-10 Maart 2019, aangekondig word.

Die sluitingsdatum vir inskrywings is 30 September 2018 om 16:00.

Diegene wat belangstel om meer oor die kompetisie te wete te kom of wat wil inskryf, kan gaan na www.woordfees.co.za en volg dan die skakels. E-pos met navrae kan ook gestuur word aan danie_marais@sun.ac.za – slegs skriftelike navrae sal beantwoord word. Die US Woordfees word van 1-10 Maart 2019 in Stellenbosch aangebied. Die feesprogram word in November bekend gemaak.

Launch: A Spy in Time by Imraan Coovadia (18 July)

Making sure the end of the world never happens again – that is Enver Eleven’s task. A spy for the Historical Agency, Enver is based in Johannesburg, the only city to survive – thanks to its mining tunnels – when a supernova hit.

In Enver’s Joburg time-travelling agents jump between the past and future, searching for an elusive enemy plotting against the Agency. Enver’s mission starts off on shaky ground: when his mentor Shanumi Six disappears, Enver must prove that he is no double agent, an allegation as frightening as a white skin in a world where it has become vanishingly rare.

But if you could go back and change the past, would the future turn out the way you want it to? Imraan Coovadia’s dazzlingly original A Spy in Time is an extraordinary tale for extraordinary times.

Event Details

Launch: A Spy in Time by Imraan Coovadia (11 July)

Making sure the end of the world never happens again – that is Enver Eleven’s task. A spy for the Historical Agency, Enver is based in Johannesburg, the only city to survive – thanks to its mining tunnels – when a supernova hit.

In Enver’s Joburg time-travelling agents jump between the past and future, searching for an elusive enemy plotting against the Agency. Enver’s mission starts off on shaky ground: when his mentor Shanumi Six disappears, Enver must prove that he is no double agent, an allegation as frightening as a white skin in a world where it has become vanishingly rare.

But if you could go back and change the past, would the future turn out the way you want it to? Imraan Coovadia’s dazzlingly original A Spy in Time is an extraordinary tale for extraordinary times.

Event Details

Author interview: Peter Swanson

Published in the Sunday Times

Peter Swanson, author of All The Beautiful Lies. (Author photo: unknown.)

 
What’s the one book our world leaders should read?

I’d have them read The Road by Cormac McCarthy. It’s the bleakest vision I’ve read about a post-apocalyptic world. Maybe it would do its part in preventing one of our leaders from reaching for the nuclear button. If not, it’s still riveting fiction.

Which book changed your life?

The first Agatha Christie novel I read was Sleeping Murder. It’s not her best, but I fell in love with mystery novels because of her, and I’ve never turned back.

What music helps you write?

I listen exclusively to movie soundtracks when I write. They create a mood but they also fade into the background. Lately, I’ve been listening to Jonny Greenwood’s score for Phantom Thread and James Newton Howard’s score for Red Sparrow.

The strangest thing you’ve done when researching a book?

I’m always looking up information on Google about how to murder someone, questions such as “How long do you need to hold someone under water for them to drown?”.

You’re hosting a dinner with three writers. Who’s invited?

Stephen King, Kate Atkinson and David Mitchell. If I was allowed to invite dead writers it would be Agatha Christie, Dashiell Hammett and Kingsley Amis.

What’s the best book you’ve received as a gift?

On the occasion of the UK publication of my second novel, The Kind Worth Killing, my wife bought me a first edition of Darker than Amber, my favourite Travis McGee novel by John D MacDonald. I love the book, but I also love the memory of that night.

What books are on your bedside table?

I’m reading The Darkness by Ragnar Jónasson. The next book I’m hoping to read is James Crumley’s The Last Good Kiss and then next on the pile is Lucky Jim by Kingsley Amis, because I never like to be too far from my favourite novel.

What would you tell your younger writing self?

Stop trying to be the next Hemingway and start writing thrillers. Another way of phrasing this would be to tell myself to write the books that I’d want to read.

What did you edit out of this book?

I write extensive histories for all of my main characters. Sometimes those histories make it into my books and sometimes they don’t.

How do you select the names of your characters?

I have used multiple ways to select names, including baby name books, genealogy sites, plus just scanning my own bookcase. Lately, I’ve found a couple of good surnames by taking walks through cemeteries and reading the headstones.

All the Beautiful Lies by Peter Swanson is published by Faber & Faber, R275

Book details

And our sunshine noir author for July is ... Karin Brynard!

A new month calls for a new sunshine noir author sending shivers down the spines of local thriller fans…

This month, the co-author of the popular Detective Kubu series, Michael Sears, had the opportunity to interview Karin Brynard for The Big Thrill – the magazine for international thriller writers.

Karin Brynard, author of Our Fathers. ©Penguin Random House.

 
 
 
Here’s what the two thriller aficionados chatted about:

Karin Brynard grew up in the Northern Cape and many of her books are set in that dramatic, semi-arid landscape. She was a journalist and editor for several of South Africa’s major newspapers before she became freelance to concentrate on her writing.

Her novels – originally written in Afrikaans – have been translated into several languages, and she has won a variety of literary and crime fiction prizes. Her next book, Tuisland (the Afrikaans version of Homeland), shot up to number one on the South African best seller list when it was released in 2016.

We chatted about Our Fathers, her latest book available outside South Africa.

Our Fathers is a book that tackles big themes in South Africa – the decay of family units, alienation by place as well as race, and different views from different groups as to the relationship between races in the country. Did you set out to address these, or are they the issues that will almost inevitably arise in contemporary South African crime fiction?

If you try and shadow one ordinary cop in the South African Police Service for a day, you will most likely stumble across every one of the “big themes” of this country.

Cops stand at the coal face of all the realities of life here, ranging from racism to the rape of babies and beyond. And that’s where my stories happen too, so addressing the “issues” becomes sort of inevitable.

The question everybody keeps asking is why. Why do we see so much violence, so much brutality accompanying crime? We realize that this is a deeply complex society and that we’re continuously grappling with major challenges, ranging from poverty to greed, massive urbanization and the accompanying disintegration of cultures and belief systems. It is a society constantly under pressure, exposing all the cracks.

It would be almost impossible to ignore these issues. But: in the midst of all this, there is always redemption: relief in the beauty of the place and of the unexpected warmth of the diverse people who live here, their creativity and vibrant cultures.

What better background for storytelling, especially crime? The bad, the ugly, and the good all in one go.

You ask about “alienation by place as well as race.” Placing Sergeant Johannes Ghaap, a man of Griqua origin, in a predominantly black city like Soweto gave me the opportunity to showcase some of the diversity of our society and how challenging it can be on the personal level. It was such a rewarding exercise doing so, and allowed for wonderful suspense through Ghaap’s stumbling about.

The idea for Our Fathers arose from an interview I did with a man whose son had been accused of murder – bludgeoning his gorgeous girlfriend to death with a hammer.

She was a promising student at the University of Stellenbosch and he a handsome postgraduate with an open, youthful face. It became a sensational case and the family of both the victim and the accused refused to talk to the press.

I tried very hard to get an interview. And then got lucky.

The father of the young man agreed cautiously to talk. We met on a cold winter night and talked for hours. I will never forget the man’s despairing tears as he told me how he was torn from his bed in the middle of the night with the terrible news, and of his feelings of powerlessness as the investigation became a nightmare, his growing frustration with not being able to protect his son from this horror.

After the interview, driving back through the dark, wet streets of this beautiful student town, I thought how lucky this young boy was to have a father such as this.

Which set me to thinking about the role of fathers in the life of a family – and for that matter in the bigger family of a society. In psychological terms, the father is the constant guard at the gate, often sacrificing himself to protect his family and to provide for them. He keeps things stable, provides reason, reflection, order and wisdom, according to the myths of old.

What happens in a household where the fathers are absent? Research shows that more than half of SA children grow up without fathers. It also shows the detrimental effects on the psychological health of those kids, how it impacts on male violence, on suicide, promiscuity, even academic performance.

As the writing of this story progressed, this theme in particular, grew in importance.

Continue reading their conversation here.
 

Book details

The xenophobic violence of 2008 inspired me to write The Gold Diggers, writes Sue Nyathi

Published in the Sunday Times

The inspiration for writing Gold Diggers was derived largely from the xenophobic violence that erupted in South Africa in 2008. Coincidentally, this is also the time I relocated here. The violence itself was not inspirational, it was depressing. Rather, the provocative conversations that arose following the conflicts stimulated the decision to write this book.

As much as there was sympathy and outrage from some corners, there was also antipathy from those who felt the violence was justified. I often heard the following assertions being articulated:

“What are they doing here?”

“Why don’t they go back to their own countries?”

Then there was the total disengagement from some quarters, which often arises because we feel it’s not our problem; it’s their problem. We then become complicit in our own silence. So I chose to confront this issue the best way I knew how, which is through a story.

The xenophobic violence affected various nationalities but I decided to tell the Zimbabwean story because that is the country of my birth. It is also a story I felt I could tell with great understanding and authenticity. I was born and raised in Bulawayo, which provides the opening scene for the book. My paternal grandfather, Stephen, was also a gold digger. He worked in the gold mines in Johannesburg for the greater part of his life so it is also a story that is close to my heart.

I started writing the book in 2013 and only finished it to my satisfaction in 2016. The writing process was longer because there was greater research involved. As much as I was pregnant with creativity, I also became pregnant with my son, which slowed my progress but did not stop me. I remember being eight months pregnant doing a walking tour in Hillbrow. It was important for me to understand the history of the place. It was not just enough to read about it, I needed to walk and breathe the air, which adds texture and colour to my writing.

After giving birth I took a hiatus from writing Gold Diggers and returned to it in 2015. I remember re-reading the first draft and thinking the hormones had certainly taken over! The writing was mushy and so I began rewriting a lot.

This was a harrowing story but I felt it needed to be told. Writing it was also cathartic as I wrote through my own pain. However, even in the darkest moments of pain there are moments of profound pleasure. Through my characters I try to narrate the stories of the migrant experience, weaving together a colourful tapestry.

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