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Join Kath Megaw, Daisy Jones and Vickie de Beer at the Good Food and Wine Show

Good Food and Wine Show
Star Fish: Top 10 Sustainable FishReal Food - Healthy, Happy ChildrenThe Low Carb Solution For Diabetics

 
Join Quivertree Publications at the Good Food and Wine Show – Africa’s largest culinary event!

The theme for this year’s Good Food and Wine Show is “Fresh” and it’s all about the prevailing global obsession with sustainability and a healthier planet, inspired by the global trend for urban farming and the gradual urbanisation of rural contexts.

Three Quivertree authors will be at the show:

Friday, 27 May at 2 PM

“Healthy eating from pregnancy right through to weaning” – A talk with Kath Megaw and Daisy Jones

Saturday, 28 May at 11:30 AM

“Feeding children with ADHD and other special needs” – A talk with Kath Megaw and Belinda Hall

Sunday, 29 May at 11:30 AM

“Surviving Diabetes the Low Carb way” – A talk and cooking demo with Kath Megaw and Vickie de Beer – Diabetes Type 1 & 2

Details

Book Details

PE Book Launch: I'm the Girl Who Was Raped by Michelle Hattingh

I'm the Girl Who Was RapedMichelle HattinghFogarty’s and Modjaji Books invite you to the Port Elizabeth launch of I’m the Girl Who Was Raped, a memoir by Michelle Hattingh. The author comes from Port Elizabeth, so she is back in her home town talking about her incredibly courageous book.

“Compelling, clear and beautiful writing on such a necessary topic. She shatters rape myths on every page.” Jen Thorpe, gender activist and author of The Peculiars.

“Many people think middle class women are magically immune to rape or that if they are raped their easy access to the resources they need will be everything they need to recover completely. A book that discusses the cross cutting nature of the pain all women must feel when a man rapes them can only be welcomed in a time when communities across South Africa struggle with high rape rates.” Kathleen Dey of Rape Crisis

More about the book:
That morning, Michelle presented her Psychology honours thesis on men’s perceptions of rape. She started her presentation like this, “A woman born in South Africa has a greater chance of being raped than learning how to read …” On that same evening, she goes to a party to celebrate attaining her degree. She and a friend go to the beach; the friend has something she wants to discuss. They are both robbed, assaulted and raped. Within minutes of getting help, Michelle realises she’ll never be herself again. She’s now “the girl who was raped.”

This book is Michelle’s fight to be herself again. Of the taint she feels, despite the support and resources at her disposal as the loved child of a successful middle-class family. Of the fall-out to friendships, job, identity. It’s Michelle’s brave way of standing up for the women in South Africa who are raped every day.

About the author:

Michelle Hattingh was born in South Africa in 1988. She attended school in Port Elizabeth and studied Politics, Philosophy and Economics at Stellenbosch University. She went on to do her Honours in Psychology at Cape Town University and now lives in Cape Town. Michelle works as senior online content producer at Marie Claire SA. Her work has been published in Elle SA, Marie Claire SA and Mail & Guardian. I’m the Girl Who Was Raped is her first book.

Event Details

  • Date: Thursday, 12 May 2016
  • Time: 5:30 PM for 6:00 PM
  • Venue: GFI Gallery, 30 Park Drive, Central, Port Elizabeth
  • Guest Speaker: Emily Buchanan
  • Refreshments: Come and join us for a glass of wine and snacks
  • RSVP: Fogarty’s, fogartys@global.co.za, 041 368 1425
    www.modjajibooks.co.za

I'm the Girl Who Was Raped
Book Details

Impress your guests with Jan Braai's Red Wine Pears potjie recipe

The Democratic Republic of BraaiDie Demokratiese Republiek van BraaiJan Braai’s newest book, The Democratic Republic of Braai, was recently published by Bookstorm.

Jan is well known for his legendary braai desserts, and this mouthwatering recipe for Red Wine Pears is no exception.

Have a read, and impress your guests at your next potjie get-together:
 
 

The Democratic Republic of Braai by Jan Braai

 
Red Wine Pears

Fresh fruit is always welcome around the braai fire. Especially when it’s sweet, flavourful, comes with a red wine sauce and is served as dessert.

Make sure you use firm pears for playing this game as they will hold their shape better after cooking in the red wine. Always use the quality of wine you would also drink. If you were supposed to use something that tastes like vinegar, the name of the recipe would have been “Vinegar pears” but it isn’t.

Once done, you can also serve these pears with soft mascarpone cheese or ice cream instead of the blue cheese and pecan nuts, but then it is not going to look this cool in photos.

What you need
(feeds 6)

6 pears (firm but ripe)
1 packet pecan nuts (100 g, chopped roughly)
1 bottle good red wine
2 tots soft brown sugar
1 thick strip of orange peel
juice of that same orange
1 cinnamon stick
2 cloves (actual cloves, not garlic cloves)
1 star anise
1 block blue cheese (200 g, crumbled)

What to do

1. Peel the pears with a vegetable peeler, leaving the stalk still in place. The stalk makes absolutely no difference to how they taste but it does make them look cool.

2. Get your potjie on flames and dry-toast the pecan nuts for about 2 minutes until they start to smell like they want to be part of the meal but before they burn. Immediately remove them from the potjie before they do exactly that, and burn.

3. Place the wine, sugar, orange peel and juice, and all the spices into your now empty potjie, stir to mix, and bring the mixture to the boil.

4. Add the pears, put the lid on the potjie and let it simmer for 40 minutes until the pears are soft. Turn the pears often making sure they colour evenly all over. Once the pears are soft but still firm, remove from the potjie and set aside. It’s fine if they cool down partially or completely.

5. Bring the sauce to the boil again and reduce until it becomes more like a syrup. During this time, taste the sauce and if you want it sweeter, add a bit more brown sugar to it.

6. Serve the pears with crumbled blue cheese and a sprinkling of pecan nuts, and top it off with the wine reduction from the potjie.

 
Related stories:

Book details

Give Allister and Stick a sporting chance

THE appointment of Allister Coetzee and Mzwandile Stick to the Springbok team represents an opportunity to align rugby with contemporary SA. Let’s not blow it.

Both bring considerable social and political capital. Each has proved himself to be a game-changer. At Western Province, Coetzee showed that you could field a team with eight or nine players of colour and still be the best in the country. In his eight years at the helm, he led the Stormers to the top of the South African conference three times, and won the Currie Cup twice.

Almost half the players in Stick’s Under-19 team, which went on to win the Under-19 Currie Cup, were black, most of them from the Eastern Cape.

Neither came from a culture that privileged whiteness, and they gave the lie to the prevailing wisdom in parts of South African rugby: that black players weaken a team and are the tax you pay to appease the politicians.

Stick grew up in a Port Elizabeth township with a mother who frequently struggled to put food on the table. He attended the local township school, and yet still managed to make it to the top, captaining the Sevens team that won the World Series title in 2008-09.

Coetzee grew up in Grahamstown. He has a vivid memory of watching white boys at nearby Kingswood College play rugby with the best equipment, while he had to walk to the much poorer coloured school down the road. His father died while he was very young and his mother struggled to provide for him and his three siblings.

 

 

ALTHOUGH a talented and ambitious scrumhalf, his race precluded him from playing for SA.

Stick and Coetzee reflect the tough life experiences common to the majority of South Africans, and their elevation to the upper echelons of the game must make it seem much more accessible than it has in the past.

Neither has a chip on the shoulder, or sees himself as a victim. Their victory against the odds they were born into shows character and emotional resilience.

These qualities came in handy when dealing with their respective managements.

Stick answered to the deeply dysfunctional Eastern Province Rugby Union, and Coetzee endured eight years of frequently erratic and interfering management under the Western Province Rugby Union.

But the pressures on the Springbok coach, in particular, are way more intense and, without proper support, Coetzee will struggle.

The South African Rugby Union (Saru) has done well to appoint Coetzee and Stick. But it now needs to prove that this is not window-dressing. It needs to give their new Bok coach all the resources he needs to succeed. Otherwise, his appointment will be seen to be a cynical one, setting him up to fail.

Similar privileges to those accorded to Heyneke Meyer would be a good start.

Saru forked out substantial sums at the start of Meyer’s tenure to enable him to bring his own management team from the Bulls. He was then allowed to add more coaches, such as breakdown specialist, Richie Gray.

As yet, Coetzee does not appear to be similarly indulged. There is no evidence that he has picked any members of the team announced on Tuesday.

Given that he has already been disadvantaged by being appointed three-and-a-half months late, Saru needs to do all it can to help him, otherwise it risks being accused of not giving the same opportunities to a black coach as it gave to a white, Afrikaans one.

The corporate world should come to the party: any new sponsorship deals should be predicated on better governance, which would include equal opportunity for all employees, regardless of colour.

There has been talk of the Super Rugby coaches forming a Bok “selection committee”. This must be rapidly scotched. Meyer fought for — and won — the right to have ultimate say over selection. Rightly, he argued that if he were to be held responsible for winning every game, he needed to be able to pick his team.

The Super Rugby franchises need to play their part and put petty provincial rivalry aside.

The initiative introduced in Meyer’s term of systematically resting key Springbok players during Super Rugby must be continued.

Super Rugby coaches should also give more players of colour some proper game time to increase the pool available to Coetzee.

Fans need to give the new coaching team the benefit of the doubt. A bit of generosity of spirit would go a long way. Fans, particularly those who flock to Ellis Park for the iconic All Black derbies, should learn the first verses of the national anthem so that we are no longer subjected to the dramatic amplification of sound when English and Afrikaans verses are sung. It’s not that difficult. Make an effort.

 

 

DESPITE the autumn chill in the air, there is a sense of spring-time, of new beginnings, about rugby. Unlike Meyer, who looked to seasoned troops right from the start of his campaign, Coetzee will have to start afresh. Most of last year’s team have either retired, are approaching retirement, or are playing abroad.

This should not be a problem for Coetzee, who has proved that he is happy to trust youngsters.

Stick is something of a specialist in turning rookies into stars, given his track record with the Eastern Province Under-19s.

Transformation, which is viewed as a burden by Meyer, will come naturally to Coetzee.

At the Stormers, Coetzee displayed the ability effortlessly to forge racially and culturally diverse teams. Boys of colour were given every opportunity, but so were white players. Schalk Burger, Jean de Villiers, Eben Etzebeth flourished in his time, as did Siya Kolisi, Scarra Ntubeni, and Nizaam Carr.

There is a good chance that, with Coetzee and Stick at the helm, the sense of marginalisation that has plagued black Springboks will be a thing of the past. Under Meyer, Afrikaans was used for team talks, which was alienating for black players. The new Bok set-up hopefully will better reflect our diversity of languages.

Stick’s Under-19s also brought a vibrant culture from their Eastern Cape schools — with traditional isiXhosa war and struggle songs borrowed from their elders.

Some infusion of this into Bok culture could only enrich it.

• McGregor is author of Springbok Factory: What it Takes to be a Bok, and a visiting researcher at the Institute for the Humanities in Africa at the University of Cape Town.

*This column first appeared in Business Day

 

Inaugural Jewish Literary Festival to take place in Cape Town in May

Jewish Literary Festival

 

There’s a new book event on South Africa’s calendar: The Jewish Literary Festival.

The new festival will take place in Cape Town on Sunday, 22 May at the Gardens Community Centre, and many well-known authors have signed up.

Letters of StoneHome RemediesSister-SisterBanquet at BrabazanThe Disruptors
Continental ShiftThe Crazy Life of Larry JoeTribeUs and ThemThe Rag RaceParadise
Opposite MandelaGod, Spies and LiesWorld Atlas of FoodThe Supper Club

 
Book fans can expect to see Steven Robins, Diane Awerbuck, Rachel Zadok, Patricia Schonstein, Gus Silber, Kevin Bloom, Joanne Jowell, Rahla Xenopoulos, Rosemund Handler, Adam Mendelsohn, Raymond Joseph, Greg Lazarus, Tony Leon, John Matisonn, Jenny Morris and Phillippa Cheifitz at the inaugural festival.

Nancy Richards and Marianne Thamm will moderate the events.

Read more:

Press release:

Jewish Literary Festival makes its debut

The Western Cape is fast becoming the Book Festival province. Hard on the heels of the Franschhoek Literary Festival comes the first Jewish Literary Festival (JLF) on Sunday 22 May, offering a jam-packed day of fascinating events to anyone who loves books, Jewish literature, culture and conversation.

The JLF will showcase authors, poets, illustrators, journalists, writers and educators who have a Jewish connection or are engaged with subjects of Jewish interest. The venue is the Gardens Community Centre in Cape Town, home to the acclaimed Jacob Gitlin Library which is partnering the festival and in association with the Cape Jewish Chronicle.

From 09h00 to 17h00 the various sites comprising the centre will hum with panel discussions, launches, readings, debates, presentations and book-style activities. More than 24 events will cover a variety of genres such as fiction, food, memoir, politics, academia, scriptwriting, journalism, and the arts.

Award-winning and well known authors have already committed to being part of the JLF – so look forward to meeting writers such as Steven Robins, Diane Awerbuck, Rachel Zadok, Patricia Schonstein, Gus Silber, Kevin Bloom, Joanne Jowell, Rahla Xenopoulos, Rosemund Handler, Adam Mendelsohn, Raymond Joseph, Greg Lazarus, Tony Leon, John Matisonn, Jenny Morris and Phillippa Cheifitz. The festival promises to be a cornucopia of writers and their works and more writers will be announced as they come on board. Moderators such as Nancy Richards and Marianne Thamm will bring their expertise and connections into the mix.

A full children’s programme is on offer for all ages. Authors, teachers, entertainers and carers will keep the young ones occupied all day with storytelling, workshopping and creative activities. Of course, with food being an important part of Jewish culture, delicious lunches will be served at Café Riteve and coffee bars will be open throughout the day for that brief pause between sessions.

The programme has been designed to appeal to all ages and cover a range of genres. It aims to promote constructive dialogue and discussion in the true spirit of Jewish life without promoting any single political or religious agenda. All of this book talk offers the opportunity to meet an assortment of wordsmiths, make new friends, engage with ideas and pick up some great reads.

The Jewish Literary Festival – for lovers of literature and Jewish Life.

Date: Sunday 22 May

Venue: Gardens Community Centre, Hatfield Street.

Time: 09h00 to 17h00

Enquiries: gitlib@netactive.co.za or info@jewishliteraryfestival.co.za or visit www.jewishliteraryfestival.co.za

Booking through Quicket.

Book details

Join Jenny Crwys-Williams, Vickie de Beer and Kath Megaw to chat about The Low Carb Solution For Diabetics

Invitation to the Jenny & Co event for The Low Carb Cookbook for Diabetics

 

The Low Carb Solution For DiabeticsBooking are now open for Jenny Crwys-Williams’s event with The Low Carb Solution For Diabetics authors Vickie de Beer and Kath Megaw.

A wonderful event is planned, with delicious low-carb, healthy snacks and (naturally) wine!

The event is for all parents, whether their children are diabetic or not, as well as adults who are interested in healthier eating habits.

Don’t miss it!

Event Details

  • Date: Wednesday, 13 April 2016
  • Time: 5:30 PM for 6:00 PM
  • Venue: Ellis Herbert Hall
    St Francis Of Assisi Anglican Church
    46 Tyrone Ave
    Parkview
    Johannesburg | Map
  • Guests: Vickie de Beer and Kath Megaw
  • Refreshments: Healthy, low-carb snacks and wine will be served
  • RSVP: Jenny & Co, bookings@jennyandco.co.za

Book Details