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Philip de Vos and Piet Grobler's latest blast of a picture book has just hit the shelves!

In 1838, Robert Schumann composed a 13 piece piano work which he entitled Kinderszenen (Scenes from Childhood). He later added individual titles for each movement, after his wife Clara commented that he sometimes seemed like a child himself. These 13 pieces depict the daily life and experiences of a child, as well as his relationship with his parents and with his own world – as seen from a nostalgic adult’s perspective. Philip de Vos was inspired by both Schumann’s music and titles to write verses of his own.

Philip de Vos is an award-winning author, poet and acclaimed photographer and in 2015 received a KykNET Fiesta Lifetime Achievement award for Music, Literature and the Visual Arts in South Africa. As a child he dreamt of joining the circus as a clown, today the humour in his work makes many a reader smile. He loves animals and bugs and has never even stepped on an ant on purpose. He lives in Green Point, Cape Town.

Piet Grobler is an award winning illustrator who tells stories with his paintings and illustrations. He has illustrated more than 80 books and has done illustration work for various magazines and newspapers including Sunday Times, De Kat, Insig, Sarie and Taalgenoot. He was a senior lecturer and course leader in Illustration at the University of Worcester in the West-Midlands of England.

Book details

Call for Submissions - Poetry Potion 13 (CLOSED)

“Life is a moving, breathing thing. We have to be willing to constantly evolve. Perfection is constant transformation.” 
-Nia Peeples

This call asks for submissions that speak of transformation. Personal and universal. It speaks of the new and evolved, the upgraded or reimagined. What transformation have you undergone? What transformations have you facilitated? Who facilitated your transformation? What was your process of metamorphosis? What was the outcome?

The Theme is:



Poets are encouraged to submit no more than three poems. Please refer to our submissions guidelines to ensure that you submit correctly. We are looking for new poems- poems that have not been published elsewhere.(Poems published on Facebook Twitter and Instagram are considered published)

The best poems will interpret the theme in a refreshing and unique way. The selected poems will avoid the standard and mundane. It will explore the creative use of language, subtle complexities, and include form (stanza, rhyme syntax aesthetic language etc).The best poems will inspire the reader. It will transform the reader. It will describe the process of transformation to the reader. It will present the transformed in all its newness.

Deadline 11 February 2018 11:59

To submit poems visit Make sure to familiarize yourself with our submission guidelines before submitting.

For queries, please comment below or on our Facebook page or via Twitter or send an email.

Do not submit poems via email.


Antjie Krog ontvang Nederlandse prys vir haar bydrae tot Nederlandse kultuur

Human & Rousseau en NB-Uitgewers is verheug om te verneem dat Antjie Krog die pas afgelope naweek vereer is met die 2018 Gouden Ganzenveer.

De Gouden Ganzenveer is ’n kulturele prys wat jaarliks in Nederland toegeken word aan ’n persoon of instituut ter verering van hul bydrae tot die geskrewe en gedrukte woord in die Nederlandse taal. Dié prys word vanjaar vir die eerste keer aan iemand van buite Nederland en België toegeken. In 2017 is dit toegeken aan die bekroonde romansier Arnon Grunberg.

Gerdi Verbeet, voorsitter van die Akademie van die Gouden Ganzenveer, het die nuus op die Nederlandse radioprogram De Taalstaat bekendgemaak: “Die Akademie van die Gouden Ganzenveer eer Krog as ’n spesiale en veelsydige digter, as ’n uitsonderlike skrywer en joernalis van integriteit, en as ’n begaafde kunstenaar van haar eie werk.”

Eloise Wessels, besturende direkteur van Media24-Boeke en hoof van NB-Uitgewers, het die nuus verwelkom. “Dit is vir ons as Krog se uitgewer eweneens wonderlike nuus – ons is saam met haar trots en bly.”

Joost Nijsen, Krog se Nederlandse uitgewer by Podium, meen dat die entoesiasme vir haar werk bogemiddeld groot moet wees vir die Akademie om ’n uitsondering te maak vir ’n “buitelandse” outeur. “Ons het hier by Podium op die tafel gespring toe ons dit gehoor het. Nie alleen is die Gouden Ganzenveer waarskynlik die mees gesogte literêre prys in Nederland nie, maar dit is bowendien uniek dat die prys toegeken word aan ’n nie-Nederlandse skrywer.”

De Gouden Ganzenveer sal op 19 April tydens ’n geleentheid in Amsterdam aan Krog oorhandig word. “Ek is verbysterd en op ’n vreemde manier tog ook ontroerd,” het sy gesê in reaksie op die nuus. “Dit is ook uitermate heerlik dat ‘n taal en letterkunde deur wie mens self so veel en diep verryk is, voel dat daar nie net gevat is nie, maar ook iets van waarde terug gegee is.”

Krog se jongste publikasies sluit in:
Lady Anne: A Chronicle in Verse (2017, Human & Rousseau), ’n vertaling van die oorspronklike uitgawe van Lady Anne in 1989
Mede-wete (2014, Human & Rousseau), asook die vertaling Synapse, deur Karen Press

Mede-wete is o.m. bekroon met die Elisabeth Eybers-prys (2015), die ATKV-Woordveertjieprys vir poësie (2015) en ook die Hertzog-prys vir poësie (2017). Medeweten is in Nederlands uitgegee deur Podium, en Remo Campert sê o.m. in de Volkskrant die volgende: “Lees de hele bundel Medeweten. Dan zult u het hopelijk met me eens zijn dat Antjie Krog Nobelprijs-waardig is.”

Luister na die aankondiging.

Lady Anne




#SaveOurStories: Storied’s crowdfunding campaign is live!

Jacana Media presents Storied. The project aims to create a long-term impact of keeping African stories thriving and reaching worldwide audiences. Through your investment, Storied will raise the money to help publish more African fiction and poetry which will cater for a diverse reading community and audience scaling up sales margins which will be shared with investors.

As Jacana Media publisher, Bridget Impey, explains:

We came up with this idea of Storied, and Storied is going to be the mechanism for changing fiction publishing in this country; not just for us, but for writers, for other publishers, for everybody.

This is what started it all…


The best books of 2017

Published in the Sunday Times

Looking for book recommendations? Who better to ask than the people who create them. Spoiler alert: The Nix gets most votes…

Eusebius McKaiser (Run, Racist, Run)

It is unsurprising that the best local non-fiction titles of 2017 are also the most predictable. They have had public success and rightly so. These include, for me, The Republic of Gupta by Pieter-Louis Myburgh, The President’s Keepers by Jacques Pauw, Always Another Country by Sisonke Msimang, Khwezi by Redi Tlhabi, Reflecting Rogue by Pumla Dineo Gqola and Democracy & Delusion by Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh. They deserve to be read, and engaged, as an anthology that brilliantly captures the capture of the state, the danger our democracy is in, the elusive promise of exile that one day home will be safe again, rape culture’s persistence, our various identity journeys and crises that endure, and the disillusionment of the youth with the neocolonial leadership of the ANC government. Painful but urgent truths.

Karin Brynard (Our Fathers)

Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead was a late discovery for me. I devoured all three of her novels, but Gilead took my breath away. The prose alone felt like a religious experience, never mind the themes of belonging, redemption, salvation and grace. The Third Reel by SJ Naudé – a two-fisted exploration of art, politics, loss and love – left me reeling. Naudé is destined for a great career. I first read A Thousand Tales of Johannesburg by Harry Kalmer in Afrikaans some years back. I’m glad this gem of a book will now reach a wider audience. Johannesburg is like a bedeviled wife. You eventually become besotted with her. Kalmer shows you how. Having read Paul McNally’s The Street, an excellent real- life account of life on a particular street in Joburg, I no longer marvel at the depths of depravity in our politics.

Paige Nick (Unpresidented)

The Nix by Nathan Hill. It’s a fantastic, immersive, topical read that spans lives and decades. The basic plot revolves around an underachieving writer forced to face his mother, who abandoned him as a child. But it’s about so much more than that, including American politics. Good Cop, Bad Cop by Andrew Brown is riveting non-fiction that changed the way I think about South African divides: humanity, townships, crime and policing. It should be prescribed reading for every South African – law enforcement and politicians in particular. I ugly cried and ugly laughed on consecutive pages. Dark Traces by Martin Steyn is one of the most gripping, graphic, dark and twisty crime thrillers I’ve read. Set in the world of a cop investigating teenage girls who go missing, this is a book of much evil for poor Detective Magson, and the brave reader.

Achmat Dangor (Dikeledi)

All The Rivers by Dorit Rabinyan is a riveting story about a passionate love affair between an Israeli Jewish woman and a Palestinian Muslim man that embroils them in all kinds of turmoil. It bravely crosses ethnic and religious “rivers” that divide people. Exit West by Mohsin Mohammed is told through the eyes of a young couple – Saeed and Nadia – who flee from an unnamed city during a civil war. It explores the traumas that migrants and refugees face, without ever descending into rhetoric. To leave their country, they use a magical system of fictitious doors to places around the world, and the story, as it unfolds, introduces us to a new version of “magical realism”.

Hamilton Wende (Arabella, the Moon and the Magic Mongongo Nut)

I’m researching a novel on Ancient Rome and Africa at the moment, so my two best books of the year hands-down are: The Annals of Imperial Rome by Tacitus. Its blood and sex-filled chronicle of betrayal and survival across the Roman Empire is as good as anything in Game of Thrones. My second book of the year is Satires by Juvenal. His descriptions of the excesses of Rome are breathtaking: perfumed wine drunk from conch shells at midnight oyster suppers, dizzy ceilings spinning round and dancing tables. The Roman world without too much politics!

Ray Hartley (Ramaphosa: The Man Who Would Be King)

New Times by Rehana Rossouw brings to life a journalist covering the first years of the Nelson Mandela presidency – and dealing with deep personal issues – with such raw brilliance that it is startling. I was gripped and could not put it down.

Karina Szczurek (The Fifth Mrs Brink)

The following books provided me with intellectual, emotional and aesthetic joy: Ingrid Winterbach’s deeply satisfying novel The Shallows; Hedley Twidle’s great essay collection Firepool: Experiences in an Abnormal World; Sara-Jayne King’s remarkable and moving memoir Killing Karoline; the highly entertaining Rapid Fire: Remarkable Miscellany by John Maytham; Anne Fadiman’s touching tribute to her father, The Wine Lover’s Daughter: A Memoir; and the visionary, beautiful Outsiders: Five Women Writers Who Changed the World by Lyndall Gordon.

Mike Nicol (Agents of the State)

Being Kari by Qarnita Loxton is a funny, insightful novel about contemporary life. The Cape Town setting is a bonus. Queen of the Free State by Jennifer Friedman captures the quizzical voice of a young girl growing up in the 1950s. It’s charming. And then the massive Apartheid Guns and Money by Hennie van Vuuren revealed everything we had expected but were too afraid to acknowledge.

Malebo Sephodi (Miss Behave)

Grace by Barbara Boswell will have you gasping at every turn. Her word use is absolutely delicious and the weaving of the story is close to perfection. I would love a sequel because the protagonist has never left me since I read the book months ago. I find myself wondering how she’s coping. If I Stay Right Here by Chwayita Ngamlana. This experimental fiction had me crossing legs. Shifting. Crying. Triggered.

Steven Sidley (Free Association)

The Nix by Nathan Hill is a sprawling tour de force of style and story and character, the great American novel of the year. Days Without End by Sebastian Barry is about forbidden love, deprivation and redemption, the poverty and danger of the American 1850s, told through the eyes and vernacular of a teenage refugee from the famine of Ireland. A masterpiece. Midwinter by Fiona Melrose – a story of two tragedies on two continents and its effects on a father and son, who through mutual awkwardness, incoherent grief and rage play out against their attempts at love and family in the deep and muddy earth of county Suffolk in England.

Diane Awerbuck (South)

Nick Mulgrew’s The First Law of Sadness is tied for first place with Koleka Putuma’s Collective Amnesia. They are both what I love and look for in fiction and poetry: truth in all its awkward beauty. I also love that you can see these two perform their work, because they’re local, and because they care.

Tony Park (The Cull)

The Girl From Venice by Martin Cruz Smith, who writes sparingly yet beautifully and still manages to produce a gripping page turner. A disillusioned veteran of Mussolini’s dirty war in Africa returns to civilian life as a fisherman in his native Venice, which is still under Nazi Occupation. Into his lap lands a beautiful, rich woman on the run. Perfect. The Cuban Affair by Nelson Demille is a good example of how an author can try something different without alienating fans. Ex Afghanistan veteran “Mac” MacCormick is lured out of retirement to take a Cuban-American woman back to her ancestral home to rescue a store of treasure. Mac reflects Demille’s own experiences and many others who return home glad to be out of a war zone but missing the military and a life less predictable. He paints a picture of a Cuba crumbling under Communism, but also squeezes in enough rum and rhumba to make me want to visit.

Book details

The Nix


Run Racist Run


The Republic of Gupta


The President's Keeper


Always Another Country




Reflecting Rogue


Democracy and Delusion


Our Fathers




The Third Reel


A Thousand Tales of Johannesburg


The Street




Good Cop, Bad Cop


Dark Traces


All the Rivers


Arabella, the Moon and the Magic Mongongo Nut


The Annals of Imperial Rome




Ramaphosa: The man who would be king


New Times



The Shallows




Rapid Fire


The Wine Lover's Daughter




Agents of the State


Being Kari


Queen of the Free State


Apartheid Guns and Money


Miss Behave




If I Stay Right Here


Free Association


Days Without End






The First Law of Sadness


Collective Amnesia


The Cull


The Girl from Venice



Our guide to the best holiday reads

Published in the Sunday Times

So much to read, so little time … here are some good places to start, with an emphasis on excellent local authors


Khwezi: The Remarkable Story Of Fezekile Ntsukela Kuzwayo, Redi Thlabi (Jonathan Ball Publishers): One of the absolute must-read books of the year, it’s the harrowing tale of Khwezi, the rape trial and the consequences of President Jacob Zuma’s acquittal.

65 Years of Friendship, George Bizos (Umuzi): The human rights lawyer lovingly reflects on his friendship with Nelson Mandela.


Hasta la Gupta, Baby!, Zapiro (Jacana Media): The latest collection from the cartoonist/political analyst/agent provocateur.

Unpresidented, Paige Nick (B&N): Another hilarious satire from the columnist and writer — this time about No1.

Rapid Fire: Remarkable Miscellany, John Maytham (Tafelberg): Random trivia collected by the talkshow host from his Rapid Fire insert on CapeTalk.


How to Steal a City: The Battle For Nelson Mandela Bay, Crispian Olver (Jonathan Ball Publishers): An insider’s account of the corruption and clean-up of the municipality.

Ramaphosa: The Man Who Would be King, Ray Hartley (Jonathan Ball Publishers): Hartley looks at how Ramaphosa has handled the key challenges he has faced in the unions, in business and in politics.

The President’s Keepers: Those Keeping Zuma in Power and out of Prison, Jacques Pauw (Tafelberg): The explosive book that has got the nation talking about Zuma’s shadow mafia state.

A Simple Man: Kasrils and the Zuma Enigma, Ronnie Kasrils (Jacana Media): The revelatory history of the two men.


What Have We Done, JT Lawrence (Pulp Books): Dystopian thriller series set in Johannesburg in 2036 in which the heroine Kate has to save her loved ones from The Prophecy.

Spire, Fiona Snyckers (Clockwork Books): A box of frozen viruses is brought to Spire, a remote research station in Antarctica, and within days people are dying of diseases.

Bare Ground, Peter Harris (Picador Africa): The first novel from the Alan Paton winner is packed with political and corporate intrigue, with insights into the society we have become.

Bad Seeds, Jassy Mackenzie (Umuzi): Joburg private investigator Jade de Jong tracks down a saboteur in a race to prevent a nuclear disaster.

The Cull, Tony Park (Pan Macmillan): Former mercenary Sonja Kurzt is hired by a British tycoon to lead an elite anti-poaching squad to take down the kingpins, but the body count starts rising.


Tin Man, Sarah Winman (Tinder Press): Bestseller author of When God Was a Rabbit pens a delicate and tender novel of friendship and loss.

New Times, Rehana Rossouw (Jacana Media): As Mandela begins his second year as president, political reporter Ali Adams discovers that his party is veering off the path. She follows the scent of corruption.

Dikeledi, Achmat Dangor (Picador Africa): A family saga set in a time of forced removals and the creation of bantustans.

My Absolute Darling, Gabriel Tallent (HarperCollins): It’s fraught, harrowing and divisive – some critics can’t stop raving about Tallent’s debut novel, others not so much.

Lincoln in the Bardo, George Saunders (Bloomsbury): The Man Booker prize-winning novel is an original literary experience. Abraham Lincoln visits his dead son Will in a graveyard filled with ghosts.

The Golden House, Salman Rushdie (Jonathan Cape): Nero Golden and sons move to the US under suspicious circumstances.


The Rules of Magic, by Alice Hoffman (Simon & Schuster): Prequel to the much-loved Practical Magic, this features the witchy family in 1950s New York.

Wolf Trap, Consuelo Roland (Jacana Media): Paolo Dante must save her adopted daughter from a criminal mastermind.

Did You See Melody?, Sophie Hannah (Hodder & Stoughton): Hannah transports the reader to a sunny Arizona spa where a cast of characters are all suspects in an old missing-child case.

Little Fires Everywhere, Celeste Ng (Little Brown): A hearty slice of American life in the Clinton era.

The Blessed Girl, Angela Makholwa (Pan Macmillan): Bontle Tau has to juggle her family and friends and all the men in her life wanting to give her emotional and financial support.

The Break, Marian Keyes (Michael Joseph): Amy’s husband decides he wants a break from their marriage and children, and to lose himself in South Asia.

Sleeping Beauties, Stephen King and Owen King (Hodder & Stoughton): The prolific writer and his son team up to tell the tale of a mysterious sleeping syndrome in a women’s prison.


Always Another Country, Sisonke Msimang (Jonathan Ball Publishers): One of the most searing voices of contemporary South Africa, this is Msimang’s candid and personal account of her exile childhood in Zambia and Kenya, college years in North America, and returning to the country in the ’90s.

Dare Not Linger, Nelson Mandela and Mandla Langa (Pan Macmillan): The remarkable story of Mandela’s presidency told in his own words is finished off by Mandla Langa.

I Am, I Am, I Am, Maggie O’Farrell (Tinder Press): The writer chronicles 17 of her own near misses with death.

The Fifth Mrs Brink, Karina M Szczurek (Jonathan Ball Publishers): A soul-baring memoir of Szczurek’s life before, with and after her marriage to André P Brink.

Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery, Scott Kelly (Doubleday): The astronaut’s gripping adventures of his year on the International Space Station in 2015.

Adventures of a Young Naturalist: The Zoo Quest Expeditions, David Attenborough (John Murray): The man who made nature cool gives a record of the voyages he did for the 1950s BBC show The Zoo Expeditions.

Outsiders, Lyndall Gordon (Little Brown): A profound investigation into the lives and works of Mary Shelley, Emily Brontë, George Eliot, Olive Schreiner and Virginia Woolf.

I’ll Take the Sunny Side, Gordon Forbes (Bookstorm): Memoirs from the author of A Handful of Summers and Too Soon to Panic.


Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds, Yemisi Aribisala (Pan Macmillan): This down-to-earth collection from Aribisala, uses food as a lens to observe Nigerian society.

A Hat, a Kayak and Dreams of Dar, Terry Bell (face2face): In 1967 journo Bell and wife Barbara were living in exile in London when they decided to go back to Africa by paddling from England to Dar es Salaam in a 5m kayak.

Shisanyama: Braai Recipes from South Africa, Jan Braai (Bookstorm): Jan Braai’s first crowd-sourced cookbook.

The Sun and Her Flowers, Rupi Kaur (Simon & Schuster): The poet’s second collection is proving to be as popular as her first.

Way of the Wolf, Jordan Belfort (Hodder & Stoughton): The Wolf of Wall Street reveals his step-by-step playbook on making the sale.

The Curse of Teko Modise, Nikolaus Kirkinis (Jacana Media): How Modise overcame poverty to become “the General” and one of South Africa’s best footballers.

Collective Amnesia, Koleka Putuma (Uhlanga Press): A bestselling poetry collection that hits all of the emotions.

From Para to Dakar, Joey Evans (Tracey Macdonald Publishers): Evans shares how he faced the toughest challenges to fulfil his dream of competing in the 2017 Dakar Rally.

200 Women: Who Will Change the Way You See the World, Geoff Blackwell, Ruth Hobday, Kieran Scott (Bookstorm): The women, from a variety of backgrounds, are asked the same five questions and their answers are inspiring.

Book details



65 Years of Frienship

Hasta la Gupta, baby!


Rapid Fire

How To Steal A City

Ramaphosa: The man who would be king

The President's Keeper

A Simple Man



Bare Ground

Bare Ground by Peter Harris
EAN: 9781770105812
Find this book with BOOK Finder!

Bad Seeds

The Cull

Tin Man

New Times


My Absolute Darling

Lincoln in the Bardo

The Golden House

The Rules of Magic

Wolf Trap

Did You See Melody?

Little Fires Everywhere

The Blessed Girl

The Break

Sleeping Beauties

Always Another Country

Dare Not Linger

I am, I am, I am

The Fifth Mrs Brink


Adventures of a Young Naturalist


I'll Take the Sunny Side

Longthroat Memoir

A hat, a kayak


the sun and her flowers

Way of the Wolf

The Curse Of Teko Modise

Collective Amnesia

From Para to Dakar

200 Women